LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (2024)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (1)

ITZIAR IDIAZABAL & MANEL PÉREZ-CAUREL (EDS.)

Organizaciónde las Naciones Unidas

para la Educación,

Hezkuntza,Zientzia eta Kulturarako

Nazio Batuen Erakundea

la Ciencia y la Cultura

Munduko Hizkuntza OndarearenUNESCO KatedraCátedra UNESCOde Patrimonio Lingüístico MundialUNESCO Chairon World Language Heritage

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIVMINORITY LANGUAGES MINORITY LANAND SUSTAINABLE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELDIVERSIDAD LINGÜÍSTICA, DIVERSIDAD LENGUAS MINORIZADAS LENGUAS MINY DESARROLLO Y DESARROLLO Y DESSOSTENIBLE SOSTENIBLE SOSTENIBLDIVERSITÉ LINGUISTIQUE, DIVERSITÉ LANGUES MINORITAIRES LANGUES MIET DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DÉVELOPPEMDURABLE DURABLE DURABLE DURAB

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (2)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, MINORITY LANGUAGES AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

DIVERSIDAD LINGÜÍSTICA, LENGUAS MINORIZADAS Y DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

DIVERSITÉ LINGUISTIQUE, LANGUES MINORITAIRES ET DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE

Edted by Editado por

Itziar Idiazabal Manel Pérez- Caurel

With the colaboration of Nora EtxanizCon la colaboración de Nora Etxaniz

UNESCO Chair on Wordl Language Heritage of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)

Cátedra UNESCO de Patrimonio Lingüístico Mundial de la Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU)

Euskal Herriko Unibertsitateko (UPV/EHU) Munduko Hizkuntza Ondarearen UNESCO Katedra

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (3)

CIP. Biblioteca Universitaria

Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible = Diversité linguistique, langues menacées et développement durable / Itziar Idiazabal & Manel Pérez-Caurel (eds.) ; [con la colaboración de = with the colaboration of, Nora Etxaniz]. – Datos. – Bilbao : Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Argitalpen Zerbitzua = Servicio Editorial, [2019]. – 1 recurso en línea : PDF (262 p.)

Textos en inglés, español y francésModo de acceso: World Wide WebISBN: 978-84-1319-070-9.

1. Minorías lingüísticas. 2. Multilingüismo. 3. Lenguaje y lenguas - Revitalización. 4. Desarrollo sostenible. I. Idiazabal, Itziar, editor. II. Pérez-Caurel, Manel, editor. III. Etxaniz, Nora, colaborador.

(0.034)81’282

The edition of this volume has been made possible through financial Support of the Basque Government, Culture and Linguistic Policy Department and the Foundation AZKUE

Esta edición se ha realizado gracias a la financiación del Gobierno Vasco /Eusko Jaurlaritza, Departamento de Cultura y Política Lingüística y de la Fundación AZKUE

Portada y maquetación: Karina Senatore

© Servicio Editorial de la Universidad del País VascoEuskal Herriko Unibertsitateko Argitalpen Zerbitzua

ISBN: 978-84-1319-070-9

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (4)

INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCCIÓNItziar Idiazabal..............................................................................

LANGUAGE DIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENTDIVERSIDAD LINGÜÍSTICA Y DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

Linguistic diversity, sustainability and multilingualism: global language justice inside the doughnut holeSuzanne Romaine...........................................................................

The UNESCO World Atlas of Languages and its response to sustainable developmentChristopher Moseley and Kristen Tcherneshoff....................................

Plurality and diversity of languages in Africa: asset for sustainable developmentH. Ekkehard Wolff..........................................................................

Languages and communication observed from spiritual traditions. Some underestimated elements of linguistic diversity and cultural sustainabilityAlicia Fuentes-Calle........................................................................

The importance of learners’ own languages in achieving Sustainable Development Goal Four (Ethiopia and Cambodia)Carol Benson...............................................................................

SUMMARYÍNDICE

7

40

62

74

99

116

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (5)

Las lenguas alóctonas como factor de conocimiento y cohesiónM. Carme Junyent..........................................................................

STUDIES ON LINGUISTIC PARTICULAR SITUATIONSESTUDIOS DE SITUACIONES LINGÜÍSTICAS DETERMINADAS

Revitalisation of minority African languages, community response and sustainable developmentEtienne Sadembouo & Gabriel D. Djomeni.........................................

Las artes y los medios en los procesos de revitalización lingüística y culturalJosé Antonio Flores Farfán..............................................................

Crianza bilingüe de niños indígenas urbanos: cuando los hablantes asumen su agencia de revitalizadores lingüísticosInge Sichra...................................................................................

Can amazigh be saved? The implications of the revitalization of an indigenous language.Yamina EL Kirat El Allame & Yassine Boussagui..................................

Langues minorées et langues importantes : à la fois riches et pauvres les unes par rapport aux autres (Madagascar)Irène Rabenoro..............................................................................

El modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística y desarrollo sosteniblePatxi Baztarrika.............................................................................

ÍNDICE

134

141

162

181

204

217

239

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (6)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (7)

INTRODUCTION

Itziar Idiazabal

Adopted by the United Nations in 2015, the 2030 Agenda has become a universal action plan in pursuit of sustainable development. However, there is no mention of languages in this Agenda and the way in which it deals with culture is very limited. These are both key components of sustainable development. Languages are not even given a mention in the fourth goal, which champions a quality education. This is in spite of the fact that we know that the very languages we use in our education systems, the way we handle minoritised first languages or multilingualism, are one of the factors that have the greatest bearing on its quality. Teaching and experience have shown us time and time again that languages are a driving force behind development, a key factor in achieving peace and social cohesion, and ultimately a human rights issue. As Marinotti (2017) mentions, languages, and particularly minoritised ones, are a decisive factor in giving the most vulnerable groups in society (migrants, indigenous and stateless communities) access to sustainable development.

We know that the areas of the world hit hardest by poverty and the effects of climate change are very culturally and linguistically diverse regions. In these parts of the world we often witness an application of “development” models that are based on exploitation by multinationals. This in turn has an effect on the levels of violence produced by such models, especially violence against women. Furthermore, knowledge which has been built up over centuries by local/indigenous communities and passed on through their languages, which allows them to relate to each other and with their surrounding environment, is being lost forever. If, as the 2030 Agenda asserts, poverty is indeed the most serious problem that we face today, we cannot eradicate it effectively if we do not take local languages and cultures into consideration. It is crucial

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (8)

8 INTRODUCTION

to recognise the importance people attach to their language in order to curb poverty and hunger (see UNESCO Bangkok, 2012).

We want to take up the task of defending linguistic diversity in a positive way this year, 2019, which has been declared the year of indigenous languages by the UN. It is crucial to take notice of the loss and disappearance of so many languages, one after another, and at never-before-seen rates. We know that the general trend has not changed. However, our conviction and experience tell us that it is possible to reverse the decline when a linguistic community takes charge of the revitalisation of their language. Likewise, we are ever more conscious that this revitalisation, which involves all kinds of social, cultural, identity and economic factors, drives up living standards and also makes an original contribution (each language offers and constructs a special view of the world) to making the world a more interesting and attractive place.

Different experiences of normalising minoritised languages, where they have at least achieved one of the set objectives, bring about an improvement not only in the use, prestige and presence of the language but also in the service relevant to that intervention. For example, the mere establishment of bilingual signage in any area or village improves the information service provided. Where before there was no information, there is now not only some available, but it is even bilingual. Furthermore, the minoritised languages themselves are legitimised, they are given visibility and value, especially in the eyes of the community in question, but also in those of visitors.

The UNESCO Chair on World Language Heritage at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), hereafter referred to as “the Chair”, has carried out different linguistic cooperation activities which have shown that the effort made, particularly by the local community itself, always has a positive effect. For example, the revitalisation process of the Nasa Yuwe language1, which is being led by the Nasa community from the Cauca region in Colombia, shows how various aspects are being improved, including the vitality, the image and the prestige of the native language and the pride people take in being indigenous and bilingual. People are also taking up the responsibility of participating directly in their own immersive schooling model, using the native language during public events, etc. (Idiazabal, 2018). All of this evidence, of achievements made through much effort and often at significant risk, represents hope and shows it is possible to reverse the process of decline experienced by these languages and the identity of their peoples, a process which up until recently seemed irreversible.

The field of education is a target that is ever-present in the Cooperation for Development programmes as well as in the Agenda 2030 SDGs. The 4th

1 This action was begun in 2012 along with Garabide, a leading institution in the field of Basque linguistic cooperation. https://www.garabide.eus/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (9)

9ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

goal, Quality education, declares that “Obtaining a quality education is the foundation for improving our lives and creating sustainable development. In addition to improving quality of life, access to inclusive education can help equip locals with the tools required to develop innovative solutions to the world’s greatest problems.” The authors of this agenda have undoubtedly considered it to be obvious that quality education entails learning and developing one’s native languages, whether they be unofficial or hegemonic. However, as already alluded to, languages are not cited as a factor at any stage, neither explicitly nor implicitly.

Traditionally, and especially since UNESCO started to defend it in 1953, we have had the right to be educated in “vernacular language”. This was the name given at that time to native or indigenous languages which were generally unofficial languages. For the majority of these languages, this right has not been upheld. Many communities do not even have access to education at all.

In the best-case scenario, the teaching or presence of indigenous languages (read minoritised languages) in schools has been done through bilingual and intercultural education programmes, considered to be language maintenance programmes (Beacco et al, 2010). They normally introduce the indigenous language as a school subject and only at the initial levels of education. This method aims to favour easier access to the hegemonic or official language. In addition, these programmes are targeted exclusively at the indigenous population. However, the main languages that are used are hegemonic ones, such as Spanish in Latin America for example. The main focus is on learning these languages. The majority of these schools, called bilingual schools, implicitly see bilingualism not as an objective in itself, but rather as a transient stage that has to be completed; the goal is to gain access to the dominant language. Unfortunately, under these programmes indigenous communities rarely manage to maintain and develop their languages alongside dominant languages. Maintenance is precarious and the native languages are not revitalised.

This year, 2019, the year of indigenous languages, many linguistic communities are decrying abandonment, apathy and a lack of real commitment to achieving the goals that the so-called bilingual schools are formally pursuing.

“Schools should put a stop to the precarious, almost marginal practice, even in the supposedly bilingual system, of teaching indigenous languages as just another school subject which favours Spanish and its nationalist, standardised content. Once and for all, they should stamp out such harmful practices as a Zapotec teacher giving classes in the Huave region, among many other such aberrations” (J.A. Flores Farfán, 2019)2

2 From private email correspondence, authorized.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (10)

10 INTRODUCTION

“(...) we work on informal education (...) We have achieved more than the national bilingual programmes which were introduced in schools around twenty years ago and which delivered the indigenous language as a school subject. These programmes have failed to produce a single Mapuzungun speaker. We, on the other hand, have managed to produce Mapuzungun speakers in a period of three years, people who had no knowledge of this language when they first began classes with us (Sergio Marinao, Argia, 10 March 2019)3

UNESCO has been reminding us of the need not only to use our mother tongues in our education systems, but also to ensure a multilingual education, one that, on top of maintaining and revitalising native languages, guarantees knowledge of official or national languages, as well as foreign languages.

“UNESCO defines bilingual or multilingual education as “the use of two or more languages as mediums of instruction”. The organization adopted the term ‘multilingual education’ in 1999 to refer to the use of at least three languages in the school environment: the mother tongue; a regional or national language and an international language” (Bokova, 2014).

The three-language model is an obligatory reference point which is essential to ensuring the revitalisation of minoritised languages. This is because it reassures their speakers that in addition to their native language, they will also be proficient in languages of external communication at national and/or international level. This avoids them becoming isolated or suffering discrimination. Indeed, modern media and mass migration are allowing, and we are still looking at this in positive terms, the majority of indigenous populations to acquire hegemonic languages, in one way or another. This means that they become de facto bilinguals or multilinguals. Although the multilingual nature of indigenous and migrant populations is rarely valued or held up as an asset, we consider it to be an extremely valuable resource. Multilingualism is not an educational goal reserved for the elites, it should and could also be a goal for indigenous populations with their own languages.

Schooling cannot reverse the decline of so many countless minoritised languages by itself. However, as long as the necessary quality is guaranteed, it can make a great contribution to the revitalisation of these languages and generate sustainable development in the population/community it serves. We have observed this in places where multilingual education policies based on a minoritised language have been implemented.

3 “(…) irakaskuntza ez-formala lantzen dugu (…) Programa estatalak baino gehiago lortu dugu, estatuak A ereduaren gisako egitasmoa abiarazi baitzuen eskolan, duela hogei urte, eta programa horrek ez du hiztun bat bera ere sortu. Guk aldiz, mapuzungunez batere ez dakien hiztuna hartu eta gaitasunez hitz egiteko gauza izan dadin lortu dugu.” (Sergio Marinao, member of the Mapuche community in Puerto Saavedra, Wallmapu, interviewed by Miel A. Elustondo in Argia, 10 March 2019:15)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (11)

11ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

The attention paid to minoritised and/or indigenous languages, the fostering of linguistic diversity, is a factor that runs throughout society. It is an indicator of overall development, in the same way as the focus on achieving gender equality is something which permeates society and indicates, to a large extent, the level of personal and socio-cultural development of a community.

"As sources of creativity and vehicles for cultural expression, they are also important for the health of societies. Not least, languages are factors for development and growth. (…) Multilingualism opens up fabulous opportunities for the dialogue that is necessary for understanding and cooperation. Mother languages live harmoniously with the acquisition of other languages. A plural linguistic space allows the wealth of diversity to be shared. It accelerates the exchange of knowledge and experience". (Bokova, 2011)

As we shall see in many of the contributions in this volume, multilingual instruction based on the native language is the available alternative that is most highly recommended for fighting against the disappearance of minoritised languages. In the Basque Country, multilingualism is achieved through integrated language teaching which revolves around Euskera (Basque), the territory’s native, minoritised language. We believe it is a central educational and research challenge in the field of humanities and above all in language sciences. The goal is a complex one, but it is essential to achieve it if we want to make sure that ancient languages such as Basque are passed on without us missing out on any of the opportunities to interact with others and build knowledge which modern society offers us. This is how we explicitly set out the goals for multilingual Basque education: “To our minds, the great challenges which bilingual education must tackle centre around three fundamental aspects of language education: instruction in the use of languages in various settings, the development of metalinguistic strategies, and the cultivation of favourable attitudes towards linguistic diversity and particularly towards minoritised languages” (Idiazabal, Manterola & Diaz de Gereñu, 2015: 55)

At the Chair, in cooperation with other institutions4, we have been promoting the “17+1 SDG” initiative. We are convinced, and experience is proving us to be right, that linguistic diversity is a factor for sustainable development which should have a presence in the Sustainable Development Goals, at least as a thread running through a number of them as is the case with the promotion of the right to equality between men and women. It is very difficult to conceive of a quality education that neglects indigenous languages, or of a health service which treats patients in languages other than their native tongues, of which they are often ignorant or do not understand well enough.

As one partner, Patxi Baztarrika, reminds us in his contribution to this volume, “effective preservation of linguistic diversity constitutes a

4 EASO Politeknikoa, AZKUE Fundazioa, Berriz, Elorrio, and Leioa Local Councils, etc.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (12)

12 INTRODUCTION

factor for sustainable development in our societies and throughout the world”. He substantiates this claim by considering the radical socioeconomic transformation of the Basque Country, especially the Autonomous Region of the Basque Country (Spain) from the 1980s onwards and the social advancement of the Basque language during the same time period, as well as the relationship between both processes of change.

This is the setting in which the Chair presents this publication. We are taking up the tradition of the Words & Worlds project (Martì et al. 2005) which we participated in as part of UNESCO Etxea (UNESCO Centre of the Basque Country), thanks to the funding obtained after the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Basque Government and UNESCO in 1998 to develop our project on the situation of the world’s languages. We observed with interest the discourse and initiatives generated around the Millennium Development Goals (UN 2000-2015), which gave rise to such illuminating publications as UNESCO Bangkok, 2012. The incorporation of the criterion for linguistic cooperation (Uranga, 2013) is another key strategy that we believe to be indispensable in addressing international cooperation for sustainable development, as has been laid out in the Basque Government Accord of 20155. Therefore, we believe it is necessary to insist on the defence of linguistic and cultural diversity as a fundamental factor for sustainable development, albeit the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda does not explicitly do so.

It is an honour for us to be able to include contributions from the specialists we have called upon, who have generously responded with their original insights for this publication. These make up the best possible proof that we must continue to bear in mind and redefine the fundamental principles of linguistic diversity and develop initiatives to make it a basic goal. This will help it to continue to stimulate development among the most vulnerable groups in society and particularly among communities of speakers of indigenous languages.

The first half of the book contains more general contributions about linguistic diversity and its challenges as it relates to sustainable development. It includes theorising and reflections that, even if they take inspiration from knowledge and analysis of specific situations, provide information and suggestions for action to take which are relevant and applicable to any situation where there is a decline in or a threat to linguistic diversity. These

5 Deputy Ministry for Language Policy and the Basque Agency for Development Cooperation, working hand-in-hand on linguistic cooperation. Both institutions have signed a linguistic cooperation agreement, which will hereafter guide international cooperation agreements which are subscribed to on this matter. They obtained commitments to implement measures to protect and advance minoritised languages in developing countries. http://www.euskadi.eus/noticia/2015/la-viceconsejeria-de-politica-linguistica-y-la-agencia-vasca-de-cooperacion-para-el-desarrollo-de-la-mano-en-materia-de-cooperacion-linguistica/web01-s2oga/es/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (13)

13ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

are appropriate for any community whose language finds itself minoritised and/or vulnerable. The arguments offered justify why languages are decisive factors which influence sustainable development from the perspectives of different fields and points of view.

Suzanne Romaine, professor at Merton College, University of Oxford, renowned specialist in linguistic diversity and related topics such as linguistic variation or the relationships between linguistic diversity and biodiversity, presents a study entitled “Linguistic diversity, sustainability and multilingualism: global language justice inside the doughnut hole”. Using the metaphor or the image of a doughnut, professor Romain tries to explain the relationship that exists between inequality and linguistic diversity. She explores why the factor of language is absent, and how it disappears through the doughnut hole in the worldwide debate on sustainability, equality and poverty. Once more, professor Romain provides some foresight so that we can understand the extreme importance of achieving global linguistic justice and why in order to do so we must understand the complex links between language, poverty, education, health, gender and the environment, factors which have become invisible in the discourse around development. The author puts forward crucial examples and arguments so as policies can be driven forward which recognise languages as a right and as a means of achieving sustainable and equitable development.

Christopher Moseley and Kristen Tcherneshoff are the co-authors of the volume’s second contribution: “The UNESCO World Atlas of Languages and its Response to Sustainable Development “. Christopher Moseley was the chief editor of the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger (Moseley, 2009), and is currently a member of the Editorial Committee for the new World Atlas of Languages. We are delighted to be able to include this study since the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger has been and continues to be the essential point of reference for the Chair and for anyone who wishes to find out the standing of many endangered languages. Consulting this body of knowledge is the first phase in order to be able to research, advise, collaborate with and ultimately join language communities and their speakers in their fight to reverse the process of decline.

In this section we can learn first-hand the steps UNESCO is taking in order to put together the New Atlas of World Languages. Likewise, the presence of Kristen Tcherneshoff, a member of Wikitongues, is highly noteworthy. This is because in spite of the reach that UNESCO has through its Member States and all the participants that are involved in the project, there is never a complete guarantee of having covered all linguistic communities or that the report drawn up by the Member State concerned achieves the level of precision that is required for the new edition of the Atlas. Wikitongues presents itself as an independent organisation of partners who collect data on “lesser-used” languages; it is a not-for-profit organisation which thanks to its free platform is managing to recover information, working with activists around the globe so that the data included in the New UNESCO Atlas is even more reliable.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (14)

14 INTRODUCTION

The contribution of Africanist linguist H.EkkehardWolff, emeritus professor at the University of Leipzig, is entitled Plurality and diversity of languages in Africa: Asset for sustainable development? In this study, the author delves into African sociolinguistics to describe the situation this continent with such great linguistic diversity finds itself in, extreme territorial multilingualism according to professor Ekkehard Wolff, which poses different problems for language policy. One of the most serious issues is that after gaining independence, different African governments continue to apply official monolingual policies which correspond to models rolled out by European colonial powers in the 19th century. This is especially true of education systems.

Professor Wolff reminds us that sustainable development is impossible without a good, successful system of mass education. To achieve this, he posits that Africa must abandon neo-colonial policies on the importation of knowledge served up through foreign languages and instead opt for models which embrace both local and global languages.

Alicia Fuentes-Calle, research associate at the University of York and member of the Linguapax Advisory Board, deals with the topic of spiritual traditions in relation to linguistic diversity and sustainability, an issue which has rarely been tackled from a language sciences perspective. It is entitled “Languages and communication observed from spiritual traditions. Some underestimated elements of linguistic diversity and cultural sustainability”. The author explores this area through the two basic functions of language: thinking and informing on one hand and communicating on the other. She reminds us that spiritual experiences and traditions are also fields of language use and development that are intimately linked to peoples’ and communities’ cultural identity. These are traditions that have been generated, passed on and developed in native languages which affect the ways we feel and communicate, and our thinking which is embedded in our use of language. Beyond the codifying value of languages, the maintenance and transmission of spiritual beliefs and experiences developed in a language also affects the vitality of a language. They also suffer as the language fades away.

It is important to bear in mind the author’s thoughts on cultural sustainability and it is interesting to learn about the experiences of Linguapax’s work which are outlined in this section.

Professor Carol Benson from the University of Columbia offers us a paper called “Learners’ own languages as key to achieving Sustainable Development Goal Four—and beyond”. The author has extensive experience in development cooperation, most of all in the fields of education and linguistics, and she knows first-hand the situation in various African and Asian countries. Professor Benson refers in particular to Ethiopia and Cambodia and contrasts the experience of these countries to that of the Basque Country in Spain. Taking the “first language first” principle as a starting point, a regulation promoted by UNESCO since 1953 which is referred to on multiple occasions, Benson puts forward different variants of this principle applied to

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (15)

15ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

languages in low-income contexts. Among other projects, she refers to the American women who are attempting to revitalise the indigenous languages of different cultural/ethnic groups with ancestral languages which have intergenerational transmission problems. They are trying to revitalise them through bi/multilingual education programmes.

As professor Benson reminds us, the goal of all of these programmes is to be able to move towards multilingual education systems. The inclusion of the Basque experience allows an important variable to be incorporated into the proposal, since the multilingual education system does not refer directly to a language in a low-income context, but rather to a minoritised one which is in contact with hegemonic languages. Likewise, the focus is not only on those who have a minoritised language as their mother tongue, Basque in this case, but rather the entire Basque community, of whose members only 35% use Basque at home. In other words, it is important to provide arguments in favour of multilingual education models which integrate at least one minoritised language, in such a way as UNESCO’s aforementioned three-language principle can be developed whilst being tailored to the circ*mstances of each case.

Professor Benson’s arguments on sustainable development lead us to the following conclusion: we cannot aspire to fulfil goal number 4 of the UN’s 2030 Agenda if the principle of multilingual education is not accepted, especially for those populations or communities which have minoritised native languages.

The sixth chapter of the first half of the volume is provided by Carme Junyent. Professor Junyent is an Africanist linguist who is on the Linguistics department at the University of Barcelona. She is also the founder and leader of GELA (Grup d’Estudis de llenguas Amenaçades), which studies endangered languages, at the same university. Her numerous scientific publications and the important outreach initiatives and interventions she has led to promote linguistic diversity and the safeguarding of endangered languages make her one of the most prominent voices in the fight against the hom*ogenisation and loss of world linguistic and cultural heritage. Her contribution to this volume is “Allochthonous languages as a factor of knowledge and cohesion”.

It covers multilingualism generated as a result of migration, which according to the author does not have a historical tradition and constitutes one of the most daunting challenges for current language, and particularly education policy. In the face of the different phenomena that are being produced, from the assimilation or obliteration of the values which individuals bring to the creation of ghettoes that are completely resistant to cultural exchange, there is an infinite number of possible responses. The author puts forward the hypothesis or principle that people integrate better into new cultural and linguistic situations if they clearly recognise their links with the society of origin. Likewise, if it is possible to establish a creative relationship between different cultures and if languages are also treated as a factor of mutual enrichment, integration is boosted.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (16)

16 INTRODUCTION

The second half of the book incorporates contributions that could also be classified as general; however, they relate more specifically to certain languages and places which are under study and proposals specifically designed for those contexts are put forward. We believe its specificity to be its most valuable asset. The variables that intervene in the process of development and normalisation of an endangered language are always specific. As long as they are analysed with precision, as is the case with the contributions in this book, we find them to be thought-provoking and they can be useful for positively promoting the preservation of linguistic diversity, whichever language(s) the intervention is addressing.

Etienne Sadembouo and Gabriel D. Djomeni, professors at Yaoundé I University (Cameroon), offer us their study “Revitalisation of African Minority Languages, Community Response and Sustainable Development”. They advance the idea of complete immersion as an agent of revitalisation for minoritised languages and as a means to achieve the sustainable development of communities, especially when said communities are involved in the revitalisation process. They refer to various African languages, essentially without writing systems, and especially those used in Cameroon. The project involves linguists/researchers who are members of the native community or who are familiar with their language integrating themselves into the community for periods of three years. This allows them to proceed to describe the language and to teach the population how to read and write their language. This strategy aims to put in place a bi/multilingual education system based on the native language and to promote its use in certain formal settings, such as on the radio for example. The authors underline the importance of community involvement in these programmes if they are to be successful and sustainable or, in other words, if they are to achieve continuity. These total immersion interventions don’t only positively impact the target languages’ recovery and prestige and achieve more widespread use of them, but they also favour the passing down and revitalisation of cultural traditions, traditional medicine and, ultimately, the communities’ own independent development systems which would otherwise be condemned to disappear. The authors stress that the multilingual mother-tongue-based education system can have a significant impact as long as the community itself accepts that it is the principal beneficiary of the language’s recovery process.

This chapter criticises work which focuses solely on documenting languages, the goal of which is more designed to beef up the CVs of international researchers and/or academics than to revitalise the languages themselves.

It is also interesting to note the definition of mother tongue (MT) which

is proposed: the MT is not only the language that is learned first in the bosom of the family; it is that which has been the native language of one’s parents, who due to colonisation had to stop passing it down to the next generation. That shouldn’t mean that we give up the chance to revitalise the language as a MT.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (17)

17ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

The authors don’t gloss over the difficult challenges that the revitalisation of minoritised African languages poses. However, the forcefulness and the conviction with which they tie together the revitalisation of a language and sustainable development is striking, because “when the first concern of language revitalisation is the wellbeing of the community, local people end up acquiring knowledge capable of changing their worldview, their healthcare and healthcare system and food production”.

José Antonio Flores Farfán, a researcher at CONACYT in Mexico, coordinator of the Víctor Franco Pellotier Language and Culture Laboratory and Linguapax delegate for Latin America, has extensive and fruitful experience in producing multimodal materials for the revitalisation of endangered languages, particularly in Mexico. In his chapter “The arts and media in the processes of linguistic and cultural revitalisation”, he covers the work of documentation, production and use of indigenous arts (visual, musical and literary) to create materials and dynamics which can function as linguistic, cultural and identity revitalisation strategies in the indigenous communities of Mexico. It should be highlighted that these materials are not designed for teaching or created by language education specialists, but are rather the fruits of the active intervention of the indigenous peoples themselves, who bring to bear their traditional knowledge of visual, musical and literary artistic expression. However, this creativity happens in an environment where quality is demanded, and the participants have access to the multimodal media and technology which are available to us all nowadays. This dignifies languages and cultures. The work of the people who create this art increases their communities’ sense of social and historic belonging and helps promote positive self-identification and social cohesion processes. They are designed to be educationally useful for the community of speakers, who, by actively participating in their creation, are empowered and become more aware of their own language and culture. Thus, they can more effectively contribute to the process of its revitalisation.

As this chapter says, “indigenous song and music become forms of resistance, of identity, of re-evaluating traditions, of reflecting on our language, our culture and our surroundings. Singing in their languages is not only dignified; it is a way forward to survival and economic wellbeing.”

The author’s extensive experience in promoting these materials and the “indirect revitalisation” methodology seems to us a highly valuable and original contribution and it constitutes great practice for tackling the complex and challenging process of revitalising indigenous languages.

Researchers Yamina El Kirat El Allame and Yassine Boussagui from Rabat’s Mohammed V University (Morocco) present their study “Can Amazigh be saved? The implications of the revitalisation of an indigenous language”. This contribution describes the changes experienced by the Amazigh or Berber language in Morocco both at educational level (since 2003) and in terms of its recognition as an official language (in 2011). The authors are of the opinion that the answer is not to compete with Arabic or

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (18)

18 INTRODUCTION

French, the current dominant languages in Morocco, but rather to let Amazigh find its own place and position as a language of daily use, with the challenge being to shed its status as a “dialect” which is only used behind closed doors. It should have all the functions that languages currently have in the fields of education, training and the media, as well as in modern cultural production.

Interesting data on the Amazigh-speaking population in Morocco are provided, as well as information on their sociolinguistic situation. The authors analyse the initiatives that have been implemented in the last few years in order to raise the language’s prestige. However, the difficulties that this North African language faces in terms of planning, both status challenges and corpus challenges, in order to achieve real revitalisation are very severe. Among others, the difficulties that Amazigh is experiencing in adopting a writing system are detailed; this problem arises because of the conflict between the Latin, Arabic and Tifinagh alphabets. Likewise, the authors explore the possibility that the language’s revitalisation could have an impact on the sustainable development of the Amazigh-speaking regions, areas with fragile economies and high poverty rates. However, as the authors say, “When a minority community’s language is excluded from official communication, the whole community is excluded and the development process is hindered in the whole society”

Linguist Irène Rabenoro, who gained her PhD from Paris 7 University, is a professor at the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar. She has been head of UNESCO’s Higher Education Section and has also held important positions both at her university and within the Madagascan Government. The author raises important issues relating to the revitalisation of the Malagasy language in her chapter “Reviving interest in Malagasy, a minority language, from the perspective of sustainable development in Madagascar: why and how?”

The study attempts to explain the great paradox which surrounds the Malagasy language. It is the native language, the national language and the only language spoken by the vast majority of the Madagascan population. However, it finds itself being displaced by French, the colonial language, turning it into a minoritised language in its own territory. In addition, the geographical varieties of Malagasy are mutually intelligible, but this doesn’t seem to be enough to assure the language’s vitality either. It could be said, indeed, that becoming an independent country in 1960, albeit after 64 years of French colonisation, has not had any influence on the development of Malagasy, just as there has been no positive economic effect, given the levels of extreme poverty suffered by this huge island in the Indian Ocean. The minoritisation experienced by the Malagasy language can be considered one of the clearest examples of the link that exists between the defence of native languages and sustainable development. The author mentions that Malagasy is the language of the poor and as the poor are in the majority in Madagascar the language also finds itself living in poverty. Malagasy is not used in the education system except during the initial stages, after which French or English or other foreign languages take the leading role in educational instruction. As a result, the

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (19)

19ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

passing down of the language between generations is in steep decline as nobody values their native tongue. Professor Rabenoro also reminds us that there have been no studies conducted which explain or expose this link.

The author maintains that an obvious alternative would be to promote a bi/multilingual education based on the native minoritised language, so as that whilst the population are developing their skills and becoming literate in Malagasy, they can also be learning French or other foreign languages. This way the native language is re-valued, whilst avoiding the potential discrimination that would result from monolingual instruction exclusively in Malagasy.

The author reminds us of the strengths of the Malagasy language and culture, of the resources it has which can underpin its vitality, such as the kabary “storytellers” (kabary is a traditional form of Malagasy public speech, often conducted as a call-and-response dialogue), whose profession is highly valued in Malagasy society.

Focusing on bilingual education, with the goal of developing oral

communication skills, Rabenoro suggests a bilingual French-Malagasy game which would be broadcast on radio and television. She includes interesting linguistic analysis of the differences and similarities between French and Malagasy which would justify the decisions made in devising said game. We believe associating bilingual education with play as well as with metalinguistic reflection to be highly appropriate. However, above all we believe focusing on developing oral communication skills to be the correct strategy. When schooling people in minoritised languages, the risk of focusing on written communication is high and this decision can greatly condition the use of the language, and therefore its revitalisation.

Inge Sichra, who obtained her PhD in sociolinguistics from the University of Vienna and is currently a professor at San Simón University in Cochabamba, Bolivia, is a foremost specialist in the revitalisation of minoritised languages, particularly in the Latin American context. Her contribution “Bilingual upbringing of urban indigenous children: when speakers assume their agency as linguistic revitalisers” is an overview of the new life that has started to be breathed into the revitalisation of at least some indigenous Latin American languages. The learning, transmission and particularly the use of minoritised languages is not now merely a social or moral right which is recognised in the indigenous environment, but rather a factor which generates development because the indigenous peoples themselves become the subjects of “disruptive measures based on the determination to be coherent with the discourse of claiming and exercising linguistic and cultural rights”. Indeed, although the role of the state in officially recognising a language and promoting revitalisation policies is indispensable, there is only hope when the native community is empowered and takes up responsibility, when it feels pride in passing down its own language and in using it in all contexts.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (20)

20 INTRODUCTION

The author uses her own experience of having passed down her German language to her children in spite of living in a Spanish-dominated environment as a reference point. However, she makes particular reference to mothers and fathers who, being native speakers of indigenous languages, but living in urban settings where these languages are scarcely present, decide to socialise their children in Quechua or Aymara. This automatically makes these children literate bilinguals. This raising of awareness and this intervention on the part of members of the community who are native speakers of an indigenous language, but also bilinguals with a university education, is a lot more effective. In fact, in the so-called bilingual schools, where the maintenance of the indigenous language is theoretically pursued, neither the community nor the children take ownership of their language and culture and the trend of the native language being displaced by the dominant language continues to grow.

The most interesting point is the fact that when communities accept their role as active agents in linguistic revitalisation, they are more efficient in the process of revitalising their language and they even become agents of general development. This is development which is naturally sustainable because the community feels directly involved and is not waiting for external academic, economic or political agents to act. As the author adds “it is the people, mothers and fathers who are turning to the decolonising potential of using and passing down indigenous languages, in a subversive way, turning to the rediscovery of an identity that has been denied, prohibited or made invisible to them, to the audibility of their mother tongues”.

To conclude this volume, we have Patxi Baztarrika’s contribution on “The Basque model of linguistic revitalisation and sustainable development”. Baztarrika is a specialist in language policy, especially in the case of Basque. It is not a coincidence that he was Deputy Regional Minister for Language Policy for the Basque Government for 8 years (2005 -2009 and 2012 – 2016), and he is also very familiar with European language policy, having chaired the NDLP (Network to Promote Linguistic Diversity) from 2015-2017.

As editor of this volume which has been born out of the Chair’s reflection

on the value of linguistic diversity and its defence as a factor for development, I am pleased that we are able to include Baztarrika’s contribution on the Basque model of linguistic revitalisation. We believe that the process which is underway in the Basque Country to normalise the indigenous Basque language is an important example which shows how languages can affect the transformation of society. And Baztarrika is among those who know this process best. Moreover, his exploration of the influence of Basque’s revitalisation encompasses development areas that are different from those traditionally discussed. This very volume demonstrates that the majority of authors refer mainly to the field of education. We agree on the importance of guaranteeing education systems that ensure that indigenous languages are taught whilst simultaneously allowing for bi/multilingual instruction for all students, whether they are indigenous or not. We believe it is a difficult but

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (21)

21ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

crucial challenge in order to guarantee the continuity of linguistic diversity. Nevertheless, when a community or society decides that it wants its indigenous language to develop like any other language without renouncing the learning and use of other languages, whether they be languages of communication in the local area or international languages, all sectors of society must be transformed. The revitalisation of a minoritised language is a cross-sectional task which affects everything; that is why it becomes a factor for sustainable development. Baztarrika offers us a detailed, rigorously documented description of the social changes which have come about thanks to or in the context of the process of normalising Basque language. The author defines the Basque linguistic revitalisation model as “a societal model founded on criteria of equal rights and opportunities for all citizens, based on a Social Pact which refers to the language issue and responds to a high degree of social and political consensus”. We believe he is correct in this description.

We know that the circ*mstances surrounding each language and its community are unique, but we believe that getting to know the other can help us to get to know ourselves, not in order to copy others, but in order to find our own path. This has been the goal of this book: identifying and sharing the ways we can tackle the defence of linguistic diversity, whilst exploring alternatives to allow the peoples who are heirs of this heritage to continue sharing their culture and original knowledge with the world, to reverse the trend of loss, and to in turn generate sustainable development starting with their own communities.

We believe that the contributions which have been so generously offered to us by the specialists we have called upon masterfully address the majority of factors involved in this challenging undertaking. It only remains for us at the UNESCO Chair on World Language Heritage at the UPV/EHU to express our heartfelt gratitude for the opportunity we have been given to delve deeper into this field and therefore to be able to continue to more effectively tackle the task in which we will continue to be involved.

References

Beacco, J.-C., Byram, M., Cavalli, M., Coste, D., Cuenat. M.-E., Goullier, F. & Panthier, J. et al, (2010) Guide pour le developpement et la mise en oeuvre de curriculums pour une éducation plurilingüe et interculturelle Strasbourg: Conseil de l’Europe.

Benson, C. (2016). Adressing language of instruction issues in education: Recommendations for documenting progress. UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report. Obtenido en http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002455/245575E.pdf

Idiazabal, I. Manterola, I. & Diaz de Gereñu, L.( 2015) “ Objetivos y recursos diddácticos para la enseñanza plurilingüe”, in I. Garcia-Azkoaga & I. Idiazabal (Eds. ) Para una Ingenieria Didáctica de la Educación Plurilingüe, Bilbao: Servicio Editorial de la Universidad del País Vasco

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (22)

22 INTRODUCTION

(UPV/EHU), 39-60.Idiazabal, I., (2017) ¿Qué significa la escuela bilingüe para lenguas minorizadas

como el Nasa Yuwe o el euskera? Onomázein N.º especial | Las lenguas amerindias en Iberoamérica: retos para el siglo XXI: 137 - 152

Bokova, I., UNESCO 2011, Mother tong international day, Obtenido de https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000191071

Bokova, I., UNESCO 2014, Mother tong international day, Obtenido de http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-mother-language-day-2014/

Marinotti, J.- P. (Ed.) (2017) Final Report of the Symposium on Language, the Sustainable Development Goals, and Vulnerable Populations New York, 11-12 May 2017 Edited by City University of New York, Obtenido de http://www.languageandtheun.org/documents.html.

Martí F., Ortega, P. Idiazabal I., Barreña, A., Juaristi, P., Junyent, C., Uranga, B. & Amorrortu, E. (Ed.) (2005). Words and Worlds. World Language Review: Clevedon U.K.: Multilingual Matters.

Ouane, A. & Glanz, C. (2010). Why and how Africa should invest in African languages and multilingual education. UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. Obtenido de http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001886/188642e.pdf

Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Obtenida de https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org

UNESCO Bangkok (2012). Why language matters for the Millennium Development Goals Obtenido de http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002152/215296E.pdf

UNESCO International Mother Language Day 2018 Obtenido de https://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-celebrates-power-mother-languages-build-peace-and-sustainability

UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger - Atlas UNESCO de las lenguas del mundo en peligro (Moseley, 2009)

Uranga, B. (2013) Propuesta para la integración del criterio lingüístico en proyectos de cooperación para el desarrollo. Bilbao: UNESCo Etxea.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (23)

INTRODUCCIÓN

Itziar Idiazabal

La Agenda 2030 aprobada por las Naciones Unidas en 2015 se ha

convertido en un plan de acción universal en pos de un desarrollo sostenible. Sin embargo, en esta Agenda no hay mención a las lenguas y es muy limitada la manera cómo se aborda la cultura, siendo como son ambos, elementos clave del desarrollo sostenible. Ni siquiera en el objetivo cuarto, en el que se aboga por una educación de calidad se mencionan las lenguas, cuando sabemos que precisamente las lenguas que se utilizan en la educación -el tratamiento de la lengua primera minorizada o del plurilingüismo- son uno de los factores más determinante de su calidad. La doctrina y la experiencia nos han mostrado una y otra vez que las lenguas son motor de desarrollo, factor clave para la paz y la cohesión social y en definitiva un asunto de derechos humanos. Como se menciona en Marinotti (2017) las lenguas y especialmente las minorizadas constituyen factores determinantes para que las poblaciones más vulnerabas (emigrantes, comunidades indígenas y sin estado) puedan tener acceso a un desarrollo sostenible.

Sabemos que los lugares más azotados por la pobreza y los efectos del cambio climático en el mundo son regiones muy diversas cultural y lingüísticamente. En estas zonas muy a menudo somos testigos de cómo se aplican modelos de “desarrollo” basados en la explotación por parte de las multinacionales y eso a su vez influye en los niveles de violencia que conllevan, especialmente contra las mujeres. Además, los conocimientos generados y acumulados durante siglos por las comunidades locales/indígenas, transmitidos a través de las lenguas, que les permiten relacionarse entre ellos y con el medio ambiente que los rodea, se están perdiendo para siempre. Si como afirma la Agenda 2030, la pobreza es el problema más grave al que nos enfrentamos, no podremos ponerle fin de manera adecuada si no

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (24)

24 INTRODUCCIÓN

tenemos en cuenta las lenguas y culturas locales. Es fundamental reconocer la importancia que las personas le dan a su lengua para poner freno a la pobreza y al hambre (ver UNESCO Bangkok, 2012).

Queremos afrontar la defensa de la diversidad lingüística de manera positiva en este año 2019 nominado por la ONU como año de las lenguas indígenas. Ha sido muy importante tomar conciencia de la pérdida, de la desaparición de tantas y tantas lenguas y con ritmos de extinción nunca antes conocidos. Sabemos que la tendencia general no ha cambiado. Sin embargo, tenemos la convicción y la experiencia de que es posible revertir el declive cuando una comunidad lingüística se hace cargo de la revitalización de su lengua. Asimismo, cada vez somos más conscientes de que esa revitalización, que implica todos los factores sociales, culturales, identitarios y económicos, impulsa la mejora de las condiciones de vida y contribuye además de manera original (cada lengua ofrece y construye una visión especial del mundo) a hacer un mundo más interesante y atractivo.

Las diferentes experiencias de normalización de lenguas minorizadas, siempre que hayan logrado al menos alguno de los objetivos planteados, conllevan una mejora no sólo en el uso, prestigio y presencia de la lengua sino también en el servicio que implica dicha intervención. Por ejemplo, el mero hecho de establecer una señalización bilingüe en una zona o aldea cualquiera hace que el servicio de información mejore. Donde no había información, ahora existe y además es bilingüe. Y las lenguas propias minorizadas cuentan, tienen visibilidad y valor, especialmente para la propia comunidad, pero también para los demás visitantes.

La Cátedra UNESCO de Patrimonio Lingüístico Mundial de la PUV/EHU (en adelante la Cátedra), ha llevado a cabo diferentes experiencias de cooperación lingüística en las que se evidencia que el esfuerzo realizado, especialmente por la propia comunidad, es siempre positivo. Por ejemplo, el proceso de revitalización de la lengua Nasa-Yuwe1 que está liderando la comunidad nasa del Cauca Colombiano, muestra cómo está mejorando su vitalidad, la imagen y el prestigio de la lengua propia, el orgullo de ser indígena y bilingüe, la responsabilidad de participar directamente en un modelo de escuela propio de tipo inmersivo, el uso de la lengua en actos públicos, … (Idiazabal, 2018). Todas estas muestras, logradas con mucho esfuerzo y a menudo con riesgos importantes, representan esperanza y capacidad de revertir el proceso de declive de estas lenguas y de la identidad de sus pueblos que hasta hace poco parecía irreversible.

El ámbito de la educación es un objetivo siempre presente en los programas de Cooperación para el Desarrollo y también lo es en los ODS de la Agenda 2030. En el objetivo Nº 4, Educación de calidad, se proclama que

1 Esta experiencia se inició en 2012 conjuntamente con Garabide, institución líder en Cooperación Lingüística vasca. https://www.garabide.eus/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (25)

25ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

“La educación es la base para mejorar nuestra vida y el desarrollo sostenible. Además de mejorar la calidad de vida de las personas, el acceso a la educación inclusiva y equitativa puede ayudar a abastecer a la población local con las herramientas necesarias para desarrollar soluciones innovadoras a los problemas más grandes del mundo.” Seguramente, los autores de esta agenda han considerado que es obvio que la educación de calidad implica aprender y desarrollar las lenguas propias, sean o no oficiales o hegemónicas. Pero, tal como ya hemos mencionado, en ningún caso se cita el factor lingüístico ni explícita ni implícitamente.

Tradicionalmente y desde la UNESCO viene defendiéndose desde 1953, el derecho a ser escolarizado en lengua vernácula; así se les llamaba entonces a las lenguas propias, indígenas u originarias y generalmente no oficiales. Este derecho no se ha cumplido en la mayoría de estas lenguas. Muchas comunidades ni siquiera tienen acceso a la educación.

En el mejor de los casos, la enseñanza o presencia de las lenguas originarias (léase minorizadas) en la escuela se ha realizado a través de los programas de enseñanza bilingüe e intercultural, considerados de mantenimiento (Beacco et al, 2010). Generalmente introducen la lengua originaria a modo de materia escolar y sólo en los niveles de enseñanza iniciales para así acceder con más facilidad a la lengua hegemónica u oficial. Por otro lado, estos programas están dirigidos exclusivamente a la población indígena. Sin embargo, las lenguas que se utilizan fundamentalmente y que constituyen el objetivo de aprendizaje fundamental son las hegemónicas, como por ejemplo el español en Hispanoamérica. En la mayoría de estas escuelas, llamadas bilingües, implícitamente, prevalece la idea de que el bilingüismo no es el objetivo en si, sino algo transitorio a superar; el objetivo es acceder a la lengua dominante. Desgraciadamente con estos programas pocas veces se logra que las comunidades indígenas mantengan y desarrollen sus lenguas junto con las lenguas dominantes; el mantenimiento es precario y no hay revitalización de las lenguas propias.

En este año 2019 de las lenguas indígenas, muchas comunidades lingüísticas denuncian el abandono, la desidia y la falta de compromiso real para lograr los objetivos que las llamadas escuelas bilingües formalmente persiguen.

“Las escuelas deberían dejar de impartir precariamente y de manera casi marginal, aún en el sistema supuestamente bilingüe, las lenguas originarias como una clase más a favor del español y sus contenidos nacionalistas, estandarizados, y desterrar de una vez y para siempre prácticas tan nocivas como el que un maestro zapoteco dé clases en el área huave, entre muchas otras aberraciones semejantes” (J.A. Flores Farfán, 2019)2

2 Comunicación en un mensaje de correo personal, autorizado.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (26)

26 INTRODUCCIÓN

“(…) nosotros trabajamos en la enseñanza no formal (…) Hemos logrado más que en los programas estatales bilingües que se introdujeron hace unos veinte años en la escuela y que impartían una asignatura de la lengua originaria. Estos programas no han logrado ni un solo hablante de mapuzungun. Nosotros, sin embargo, hemos logrado en tres años que haya hablantes de mapuzungun cuando al entrar en nuestras clases no sabían nada de esta lengua” (Sergio Marinao, Argia, 10 de marzo de 2019)3

La UNESCO viene recordando la necesidad no sólo de utilizar la lengua materna en la educación sino la de asegurar una educación plurilingüe que además de mantener y revitalizar las lenguas propias garantice el conocimiento de las lenguas oficiales o estatales, así como las internacionales.

“La UNESCO entiende por educación bilingüe o multilingüe “el uso de dos o más idiomas como vectores de la enseñanza”. En 1999, la Organización adoptó la noción de “educación multilingüe” para referirse al uso de al menos tres lenguas en el ámbito escolar: la lengua materna, una lengua regional o nacional y una lengua internacional.” (Bokova, 2014)

El modelo de las tres lenguas constituye una referencia obligada, imprescindible para asegurar la revitalización de las lenguas minorizadas porque es la manera de asegurar a sus hablantes que además de la lengua propia dominen también las lenguas de comunicación exterior, nacional y/o internacional y evitar así su posible aislamiento y discriminación. En efecto, los medios de comunicación actuales y los movimientos migratorios masivos están permitiendo -y seguimos pensando en términos positivos- que la mayoría de las poblaciones indígenas adquieran, de una u otra manera, las lenguas hegemónicas convirtiéndolos así, de facto, en hablantes bilingües o multilingües. Aunque esta condición plurilingüe de las poblaciones indígenas y migrantes rara vez se valora o reivindica, consideramos que es un recurso de gran valor. El multilingüismo no sólo es un objetivo educativo para las élites, también debería y podría serlo para las poblaciones indígenas con lengua propia.

La escuela no puede por si sola revertir el declive de tantas y tantas lenguas minorizadas, pero sí puede, siempre y cuando se garantice la calidad necesaria, contribuir grandemente a revitalizar estas lenguas y generar desarrollo sostenible en la población/comunidad que atiende, tal como lo hemos podido observar en lugares con políticas educativas plurilingües basadas en la lengua minorizada.

3 “(…) irakaskuntza ez-formala lantzen dugu (…) Programa estatalak baino gehiago lortu dugu, estatuak A ereduaren gisako egitasmoa abiarazi baitzuen eskolan, duela hogei urte, eta programa horrek ez du hiztun bat bera ere sortu. Guk aldiz, mapuzungunez batere ez dakien hiztuna hartu eta gaitasunez hitz egiteko gauza izan dadin lortu dugu.” (Sergio Marinao, miembro de la comunidad mapuche de Puerto Saavedra, Wallmapu, entrevistado por Miel A. Elustondo en Argia, 10 de marzo de 2019:15)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (27)

27ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

La atención a las lenguas minorizadas y/o indígenas, el fomento de la diversidad lingüística constituye un factor transversal, un índice de desarrollo global, del mismo modo que la atención a la igualdad de géneros también tiene naturaleza transversal y denota, en gran medida, el nivel de desarrollo personal y socio-cultural de la comunidad.

"As sources of creativity and vehicles for cultural expression, they are also important for the health of societies. Not least, languages are factors for development and growth. (…) Multilingualism opens fabulous opportunities for the dialogue that is necessary to understanding and cooperation. Mother languages live harmoniously with the acquisition of other languages. A plural linguistic space allows the wealth of diversity to put in common. It accelerates the exchange of knowledge and experience". (Bokova, 2011)

Como veremos en varias de las contribuciones de este volumen, la formación plurilingüe basada en la lengua propia es la alternativa posible y más recomendada para hacer frente a la desaparición de las lenguas minorizadas. En el País Vasco, el plurilingüismo se articula en una enseñanza integrada de lenguas y tomando como eje el euskera, lengua propia y minorizada de la comunidad. Creemos que es un reto educativo y de investigación central en el ámbito de las humanidades y sobre todo de las ciencias del lenguaje. El objetivo es complejo, pero resulta indispensable si queremos asegurar la transmisión de lenguas milenarias como el euskera sin perder ninguna de las oportunidades de relación y conocimiento que nos ofrece la sociedad actual. Explicitábamos así los objetivos de la enseñanza plurilingüe vasca: ”Los grandes retos que a nuestro parecer debe tener la educación plurilingüe se centran en tres aspectos fundamentales de la educación lingüística: la capacitación para el uso de las lenguas en situaciones diversas, el desarrollo de estrategias metalingüísticas y el desarrollo de actitudes favorables hacia la diversidad lingüística y especialmente hacia las lenguas minorizadas” (Idiazabal, Manterola & Diaz de Gereñu, 2015: 55)

Desde la Cátedra y en colaboración con otras entidades4 hemos impulsado la iniciativa “17 + 1 ODS”. Estamos convencidos y la experiencia está demostrando, que la diversidad lingüística es un factor de desarrollo sostenible que al menos de manera transversal, tal como se impulsa el derecho a la igualdad entre hombres y mujeres, debe participar de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible. Difícilmente se puede entender una educación de calidad que deje de lado las lenguas originarias, o una atención sanitaria que atienda a los pacientes en lenguas diferentes a las propias y que a menudo desconocen o no entienden suficientemente.

Como bien recuerda el colaborador Patxi Baztarrika en su contribución a este volumen “ la preservación efectiva de la diversidad lingüística constituye un factor de desarrollo sostenible en nuestras sociedades y en el mundo

4 EASO Politeknikoa, AZKUE Fundazioa, Ayuntamiento de Berriz, de Elorrio, de Leioa, etc.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (28)

28 INTRODUCCIÓN

global”. Para fundamentarlo, tiene en cuenta la profunda transformación socio-económica del País Vasco, especialmente en la Comunidad Autónoma del País Vasco (España) a partir de la década de los 80 y la evolución social del euskera en el mismo periodo, así como la relación entre ambos procesos de cambio.

Este es el marco en el que desde La Cátedra hemos abordado esta publicación. Recogemos la tradición del proyecto Words & Worlds (Martì et al. 2005) en donde colaboramos desde UNESCO Etxea, gracias a los fondos logrados tras el Memorándum de Entendimiento firmado entre el Gobierno Vasco y la UNESCO en 1998, para desarrollar el proyecto sobre la situación de las lenguas del mundo. Hemos observado con interés los discursos e iniciativas generados en torno a los objetivos del Milenio (ONU 2000-2015), con publicaciones tan esclarecedoras como UNESCO Bangkok, 2012. La integración del criterio para la cooperación lingüística (Uranga, 2013) constituye otra de las claves con las que creemos es imprescindible abordar la cooperación internacional para el desarrollo sostenible tal como ha sido recogido en el Acuerdo del Gobierno Vasco de 20155. Creemos, por consiguiente, que es preciso incidir en la defensa de la diversidad lingüística y cultural como factor fundamental para el desarrollo sostenible, aunque la agenda 2030 de Naciones Unidas no lo haga de manera explícita.

Es un honor para la Cátedra contar con las contribuciones de los especialistas convocados, que han respondido de manera generosa con aportaciones originales para esta publicación. Éstas constituyen la mejor muestra de que es necesario seguir recordando y reformulando los principios fundamentales y desarrollando iniciativas para que la diversidad lingüística sea un objetivo básico y siga generando desarrollo a las poblaciones más vulnerables y especialmente a los hablantes de las comunidades indígenas u originarias.

La primera parte del libro cuenta con contribuciones de carácter general relativas a la diversidad lingüística y sus desafíos en relación con el desarrollo sostenible. Se trata de teorizaciones y reflexiones que, si bien están inspiradas en el conocimiento y análisis de situaciones concretas, aportan información y sugerencias de actuación pertinentes y aplicables a cualquier situación de declive o amenaza para la diversidad lingüística y para cualquier comunidad

5 La viceconsejería de Política Lingüística y la Agencia Vasca de Cooperación para el Desarrollo, de la mano en materia de cooperación lingüística. Ambas entidades han firmado un acuerdo de colaboración en materia de cooperación lingüística, que en adelante guiará los acuerdos internacio- nales de colaboración que se suscriban en esta materia. Adquieren compromisos de llevar a cabo acciones de protección y fomento de las lenguas minorizadas de países en vías de desarrollo. http://www.euskadi.eus/noticia/2015/la-viceconsejeria-de-politica-linguistica-y-la-agencia-vas-ca-de-cooperacion-para-el-desarrollo-de-la-mano-en-materia-de-cooperacion-linguistica/web01-s2o- ga/es/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (29)

29ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

cuya lengua está en situación minorizada y/o vulnerable. La argumentación que ofrecen justifica desde diversos ámbitos y posiciones por qué las lenguas constituyen factores determinantes del desarrollo sostenible.

Suzanne Romaine, profesora de la Universidad de Oxford, Merton College, gran especialista en diversidad lingüística y temas relacionados como la variación lingüística o las relaciones entre diversidad lingüística y biodiversidad, aporta el trabajo títulado “Linguistic diversity, sustainability and multilingualism: global language justice inside the doughnut hole”. Utilizando la metáfora o imagen del donut trata de explicar la relación que existe entre la desigualdad y la diversidad lingüística y por qué el factor lingüístico no aparece, cómo desaparece por el agujero del donut, en el debate mundial de la sostenibilidad, la igualdad y la pobreza. Una vez más, la profesora Romain aporta clarividencia para que se pueda entender cómo es imprescindible lograr justicia lingüística global y cómo para ello hay que entender las complejas conexiones que existen entre lengua, pobreza, educación, salud, género y medioambiente, factores que se han hecho invisibles en los discursos sobre desarrollo. La autora muestra ejemplos y argumentos imprescindibles para que se puedan impulsar políticas que reconozcan las lenguas como derecho y como medio para un desarrollo sostenible y equitativo.

Christopher Moseley y Kristen Tcherneshoff son los autores de la segunda contribución de este volumen: “The Unesco World Atlas of Languages and its Response to Sustainable Development “. Christopher Moseley fue el jefe de la edición del UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger- Atlas UNESCO de las lenguas del mundo en peligro (Moseley, 2009) y actualmente es miembro del Comité de Edición del nuevo World Atlas of Languages. Nos satisface contar con esta contribución ya que el Atlas UNESCO de las lenguas en peligro ha sido y sigue siendo la referencia obligada para la Cátedra y para quienquiera que desee saber cuál es la situación de muchas de las lenguas en peligro. Este conocimiento es la primera fase para poder investigar, aconsejar, colaborar y en definitiva acompañar a comunidades y hablantes de lenguas que se esfuerzan por revertir su proceso de declive.

En esta contribución podemos conocer de primera mano cómo está procediendo la UNESCO para elaborar el Nuevo Atlas de las lenguas del mundo. Asimismo, la presencia de Kristen Tcherneshoff, miembro de Wikitongues, resulta de gran interés dado que a pesar de las posibilidades de alcance que tiene la UNESCO a través de sus Estados miembros y de todos los participantes implicados en el proyecto, nunca hay garantía total de haber accedido a todas las comunidades lingüísticas o que el informe elaborado por el Estado correspondiente cuente con toda la precisión que es necesaria en la nueva edición del Atlas. Wikitongues se presenta como una institución independiente de colaboradores que recolecta datos de lenguas “menos usadas”; una organización sin ánimo de lucro que gracias a una plataforma libre está logrando recuperar informaciones, trabajando con activistas de todo el mundo para que los datos que ofrezca en Nuevo Atlas UNESCO sean aún más fidedignos.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (30)

30 INTRODUCCIÓN

La aportación del lingüista africanista H.EkkehardWolff, profesor emérito de la Universidad de Leipzig, lleva por título “Plurality and diversity of languages in Africa: Asset for sustainable development? En este trabajo, el autor profundiza en la sociolingüística africana para describir la situación de este continente de gran diversidad lingüística, multilingüismo territorial extremo según el autor, que plantea diferentes problemas de política lingüística. Uno de los más graves es que tras la independencia, los diferentes gobiernos africanos siguen aplicando políticas oficiales monolingües según modelos generalizados por los nacionalismos europeos en el siglo XIX, especialmente para el sistema educativo.

El profesor Wolff recuerda que no hay desarrollo sostenible sin una buena educación masiva (que sea exitosa). Para ello, plantea que África debe abandonar las políticas neocoloniales basadas en la importación de conocimiento servido a través de lenguas extranjeras y optar por modelos que funcionen tanto con la/s lengua/s local/es como con la/s global/es.

Alicia Fuentes-Calle, investigadora asociada de la Universidad de York y miembro del Comité asesor de Linguapax, plantea el tema de las tradiciones espirituales en relación con la diversidad lingüística y la sostenibilidad, cuestión pocas veces tratada desde las ciencias del lenguaje. Lleva por título “Languages and communication observed from spiritual traditions. Some underestimated elements of linguistic diversity and cultural sustainability”. La autora explora este ámbito desde las dos funciones básicas del lenguaje, la del pensar e informar por un lado y la del comunicar por otro. Recuerda que las experiencias y tradiciones espirituales constituyen también ámbitos de uso y desarrollo lingüístico íntimamente relacionados con las identidades culturales de las personas y de los pueblos, tradiciones que han sido generadas, transmitidas y desarrolladas en las lenguas propias que afectan el sentir, el comunicar y el pensar implícito en el uso lingüístico. Más allá del valor de código de las lenguas, el mantenimiento y transmisión de creencias y experiencias espirituales desarrolladas en una lengua, también afecta la vitalidad de una lengua o sufre en la medida que la lengua se desvanece.

Es importante tener en cuenta las consideraciones que realiza la autora en relación con la sostenibilidad cultural y resulta de interés conocer las experiencias desarrolladas por Linguapax y que se muestran en esta contribución.

La profesora Carol Benson de la Universidad de Columbia, aporta el trabajo “Learners’ own languages as key to achieving Sustainable Development Goal Four—and beyond”. La autora tiene gran experiencia en cooperación para el desarrollo, sobre todo en el ámbito educativo y lingüístico y conoce de primera mano varios países africanos y asiáticos. En esta contribución se refiere a las situaciones de Etiopia y Cambodia y las contrasta con la experiencia del País Vasco español. Partiendo del principio “first language first” o escolarizar primero en la primera lengua, norma impulsada por la UNESCO ya desde 1953 y recordada en múltiples ocasiones, Benson

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (31)

31ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

aporta diferentes variantes de este principio aplicado a lenguas de contextos de baja renta. Se refiere entre otras experiencias a las americanas que tratan de revitalizar las lenguas de origen de diferentes grupos étnico- culturales con lenguas ancestrales que tienen problemas de transmisión intergeneracional, pero que intentan revitalizar a través de programas educativos bi-plurilingües.

Tal como ella recuerda, el objetivo de todos estos programas es el de poder llegar a sistemas educativos multilingües. El hecho de incorporar la experiencia vasca, permite integrar una variable importante en la propuesta, ya que el Sistema educativo plurilingüe no se refiere directamente a una lengua de un contexto de renta baja, pero sí de situación minorizada y en contacto con lenguas hegemónicas. Asimismo, el foco no sólo es la población que tiene como L1 una lengua minorizada, el vasco en este caso, sino toda la comunidad vasca en donde solo el 35% tienen el vasco como lengua familiar. Es decir, es importante aportar argumentación a favor de Modelos educativos plurilingües que integren al menos una lengua minorizada, de manera que el principio de las tres lenguas de la UNESCO ya mencionado, pueda desarrollarse con arreglo a las circunstancias de cada contexto.

Los argumentos de la profesora Benson son tan importantes para poder incidir en el desarrollo sostenible que la conclusión parece evidente: no se puede pretender el cumplimiento del objetivo 4 de la Agenda 2030 de la ONU si no se asegura el principio de la educación plurilingüe, especialmente para aquellas poblaciones o comunidades que cuentan con lenguas propias minorizadas.

El sexto capítulo de la primera parte del volumen corre a cargo de Carme Junyent. La profesora Junyent, es lingüista africanista y pertenece al Departamento de Lingüística de la Universitat de Barcelona. Es también, la fundadora y líder de GELA (Grup d’Estudis de llenguas Amenaçades) de la misma universidad. Sus numerosas publicaciones científicas y las importantes iniciativas e intervenciones de divulgación a favor de la diversidad lingüística y la defensa de lenguas amenazadas la convierten en una de las voces mas destacadas de la lucha contra la hom*ogeneización y pérdida del patrimonio lingüístico y cultural mundial. Su aportación a este volumen tiene como título: “Las lenguas alóctonas como factor de conocimiento y cohesión”.

Aborda el multilingüismo generado por los movimientos migratorios, que según la autora no tiene tradición histórica y que constituye uno de los retos más desafiantes para la política lingüística y especialmente educativa actual. Ante las diferentes actuaciones que se están produciendo, desde la asimilación o anulación de los valores que aportan los individuos hasta la creación de guetos impermeables al intercambio cultural, puede haber infinidad de respuestas. La autora propone la hipótesis o principio de que las personas se incorporan mejor a las nuevas situaciones culturales y lingüísticas si tienen claros sus vínculos con la sociedad de origen y si hay posibilidades de una relación creativa entre culturas diversas y cuando las lenguas se tratan también como elemento de enriquecimiento mutuo.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (32)

32 INTRODUCCIÓN

La segunda parte del libro integra aportaciones que también pueden considerarse de carácter general, pero están relacionadas con lenguas y lugares más específicos, en donde se están realizando prácticas o se plantean propuestas diseñadas específicos para esos contextos. La especificidad nos parece que es precisamente su valor mas importante. Las variables que intervienen en un proceso de desarrollo y normalización de lenguas amenazadas son siempre específicas; en la medida en que se analicen con precisión, como es el caso de las aportaciones de este libro, consideramos que resultan sugerentes y pueden servir para impulsar positivamente el reto de la defensa de la diversidad lingüística, cualquiera que sea la/s lengua/s objeto de intervención.

La aportación de Etienne Sadembouo y Gabriel D. Djomeni, profesores de la Universidad Yaoundé I (Camerún), lleva por título “Revitalisation of African Minority Languages, Community Response and Sustainable Development”. Plantean la noción de la Inmersión total como agente de revitalización de las lenguas minorizadas y como medio para el desarrollo sostenible de las comunidades, especialmente cuando éstas se implican en el proceso de revitalización. Se refieren a varias lenguas africanas, básicamente ágrafas y especialmente de Camerún. La experiencia consiste en que lingüistas/investigadores miembros de la propia comunidad o conocedores de su lengua se integren por períodos de tres años en la comunidad para proceder a describir la lengua y alfabetizar/escolarizar a la población en su lengua. De esta manera se quiere logar el establecimiento de un sistema educativo bi-plurilingüe basado en lengua propia y ciertos usos formales de la dicha lengua, por ejemplo, la radio. Los autores insisten en la importancia de la implicación de la comunidad para que los programas tengan éxito y sean sostenibles, es decir, tengan continuidad. Estas acciones de inmersión total repercuten no solo en la recuperación, prestigio y mayor uso de las lenguas objeto de intervención, sino que favorecen la transmisión y revitalización de tradiciones culturales, de medicina tradicional y, en definitiva, de sistemas de desarrollo autónomo y propio que de otro modo estarían condenados a desaparecer. Los autores insisten en que el sistema educativo plurilingüe basado en la lengua materna puede tener un importante impacto siempre y cuando se logre que la propia comunidad asuma que es la principal beneficiaria del proceso de recuperación.

En este trabajo se critican los trabajos centrados exclusivamente en la documentación de las lenguas cuyo objetivo sirve más para nutrir los CV de los investigadores y/o académicos internacionales que para revitalizar las lenguas.

Es interesante también la definición de lengua materna (LM) que se propone: no sólo es LM aquella que se aprende primero en el seno familiar, sino aquella que ha sido la nativa de los progenitores, quienes debido a la colonización han tenido que interrumpir la transmisión, pero que no por ello se debe abandonar la posibilidad de revitalizarla como LM.

Los autores no eluden los difíciles retos con los que se enfrenta la revitalización de las lenguas minorizadas de África. Sin embargo llama la

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (33)

33ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

atención la rotundidad y la convicción con la que se asocia la revitalización de la lengua con el desarrollo sostenible, porque “ when the first concern of language revitalisation is the wellbeing of the community, local people end up acquiring knowledge capable of changing their worldview, their healthcare and healthcare system and food production”.

José Antonio Flores Farfán, investigador del CONACYT de México, Coordinador del Laboratorio de Lengua y Cultura Víctor Franco Pellotier y Delegado de Linguapax para América Latina, tiene larga y fructífera experiencia en la generación de materiales multimodales para la revitalización de lenguas en riesgo, especialmente, de México. En su contribución “Las artes y los medios en los procesos de revitalización lingüística y cultural” aborda el trabajo de documentación, producción y uso de las artes indígenas, plásticas, musicales y literarias para crear materiales y dinámicas que puedan servir como estrategias de revitalización lingüística, cultural e identitaria en comunidades originarias de México. Hay que destacar que estos materiales no son materiales didácticos al uso creados por especialistas en la enseñanza de lenguas, sino fruto de la intervención activa de los propios indígenas que aportan sus saberes tradicionales de expresión plástica, musical y literaria, pero realizados con las exigencias de calidad y la asistencia de los medios y las tecnologías multimodales, hoy a disposición de todos. Esto hace que se dignifiquen las lenguas y culturas, al igual que el trabajo de sus creadores, se incremente el sentido de pertenencia social e histórica y sirvan como procesos de auto-identificación positiva y de cohesión social. Están diseñados para ser de utilidad educativa para las comunidades hablantes, quienes, al intervenir activamente en su creación, se empoderan y adquieren conciencia de su propia lengua y cultura y pueden así intervenir de manera más eficaz en el proceso de su revitalización.

Tal como se dice en el texto, “la canción y la música indígenas, devienen en formas de resistencia, de identidad, de revaloración de tradiciones, de reflexión sobre la lengua, la cultura y el entorno; cantar en sus lenguas no es solo digno sino un camino a seguir en la supervivencia y el bienestar económico.”

La extensa experiencia del autor en el impulso de estos materiales y de esta metodología de “revitalización indirecta” nos parece de gran valor y originalidad y constituye una excelente práctica para los complejos y desafiantes procesos de revitalización de las lenguas originarias.

Las investigadoras Yamina El Kirat El Allame y Yassine Boussagui de la Universidad Mohammed V de Rabat (Marruecos) presentan el trabajo “Can Amazigh be saved? The implications of the revitalization of an indigenous language”. En esta intervención se describen los cambios experimentados por la lengua amazigh o bereber en Marruecos tanto a nivel educativo (desde 2003) como en su reconocimiento como lengua oficial (en 2011). Las autoras consideran que no se trata de competir con el árabe o el francés, lenguas dominantes actualmente en Marruecos, sino en que el amazigh encuentre su lugar como lengua de uso y posición propios con el reto de superar el estatus de “dialecto” y de uso solamente privado. Debe

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (34)

34 INTRODUCCIÓN

contar con todas las funciones que actualmente tienen las lenguas tanto en el ámbito educativo, de la formación, de los media, así como en la producción cultural moderna.

Aportan interesantes datos sobre las características de la población de habla amazigh en Marruecos, así como de su situación sociolingüística. Analizan las iniciativas que se están llevando a cabo en los últimos años para prestigiar la lengua, pero los retos que tiene que afrontar esta lengua del norte africano a nivel de planificación, tanto de estatus como de corpus, para que se produzca una revitalización real son muy importantes. Entre otros, se muestran las dificultades que el amazigh está experimentando al tener que adoptar un sistema de escritura, dado que están en pugna el alfabeto latino, el árabe y el tifinagh. Las autoras exploran, asimismo, las posibilidades de que la revitalización de la lengua pueda repercutir en al desarrollo sostenible de las regiones de habla Amazigh, regiones con niveles de economía frágil y pobreza. Pero como dicen las autoras, “When a minority community’s language is excluded from official communication, the whole community is excluded and the development process is hindered in the whole society”

La lingüista Irène Rabenoro, doctora por la Universidad de Paris 7, es profesora de la Universidad de Antananarivo, Madagascar. Ha sido jefe de la Sección de Educación Superior de la UNESCO y también ha ejercido importantes cargos tanto en la Universidad como en el Gobierno de Madagascar. La autora plantea cuestiones importantes para la revitalización de la lengua malgache en su intervención “Raviver l’intérêt pour le malgache, langue minorée, dans une perspective de développement durable à Madagascar : pourquoi et comment ?”

El trabajo intenta explicar la gran paradoja que se produce en torno a la lengua malgache. Se trata de la lengua propia, lengua nacional y única de la gran mayoría de la población de Madagascar y, sin embargo, su situación de desplazamiento por el francés, lengua colonial, la convierte en lengua minorizada en su propio territorio. Por otro lado, las variedades geográficas del malgache son intercomprensibles, pero tampoco esto parece ser suficiente para asegurar la vitalidad de la lengua. Puede considerarse, en efecto, que la independencia lograda en 1960, eso sí, tras 64 años de colonización francesa, no ha ejercido ninguna influencia en el desarrollo de esta lengua, como tampoco se ha producido a nivel económico, dados los niveles de pobreza extremos que sufre esta enorme isla del Índico. La situación de minoración de la lengua malgache puede considerarse como uno de los ejemplos más claros de la relación que existe entre la defensa de las lenguas propias y el desarrollo sostenible. La autora menciona que el malgache es la lengua de los pobres y como los pobres son mayoritarios en Madagascar también la lengua se encuentra en una situación de pobreza. El malgache no es lengua de enseñanza salvo en los primeros niveles educativos y son el francés o el inglés u otras lenguas extranjeras las que ocupan el papel preponderante en el sistema educativo. Por consiguiente, la transmisión intergeneracional está en grave declive porque nadie valora su propia lengua. Recuerda también que no se han realizado estudios que expliquen o planteen esta relación.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (35)

35ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

La autora sostiene que una alternativa evidente sería impulsar una educación bi-multilingüe basada en la lengua minorizada propia, de manera que desarrollando y alfabetizándose en malgache puedan también aprender el francés u otras lenguas extranjeras. De este modo se revaloriza la propia lengua, pero se evita la posible discriminación que resultaría de una formación monolingüe exclusivamente malgache.

La autora recuerda las fortalezas de la lengua y cultura malgache, de sus recursos propios en los que sustentar su vitalidad, como la de los “contadores” kabary que constituyen una profesión muy valorada en la sociedad malgache.

Pensando en la educación bilingüe y con el objetivo de desarrollar las capacidades orales, plantea un juego bilingüe francés-malgache que sería radio-televisado. Aporta interesantes análisis lingüísticos de las diferencias y similitudes entre el francés y el malgache que justificarían las decisiones adoptadas para elaborar el mencionado juego bilingüe. Nos parece muy pertinente asociar la enseñanza bilingüe con el juego, y también con la reflexión metalingüística, pero sobre todo nos parece acertado centrar la actividad en la capacitación del uso oral. Cuando se trata de escolarizar en las lenguas minorizadas, el riesgo de centrarse en lo escrito es grande y esta decisión puede condicionar grandemente el uso de esa lengua y por consiguiente su revitalización.

Inge Sichra, doctora en Sociolingüística por la Universidad de Viena y profesora de la Universidad San Simón de Cochabamba, Bolivia, es una gran especialista en revitalización de lenguas minorizadas, especialmente del ámbito de América Latina. Su aportación “Crianza bilingüe de niños indígenas urbanos: cuando los hablantes asumen su agencia de revitalizadores lingüísticos” constituye una muestra de los nuevos aire que parece que empiezan a correr en la revitalización de al menos algunas lenguas indígenas de Latinoamérica. El aprendizaje, la transmisión y especialmente el uso de las lenguas minorizadas ya no es solamente un derecho social o moral que se reconoce en el ámbito indígena, es un factor que genera desarrollo porque los propios indígenas se convierten en los sujetos de “acciones contracorriente sustentadas en la determinación de ser coherentes con el discurso de reivindicación y ejercicio de derecho lingüístico y cultural”. Efectivamente, aunque el papel del Estado reconociendo la oficialidad y promoviendo las políticas de revitalización es indispensable, solamente hay esperanza cuando la propia comunidad se empodera y se hace responsable, se enorgullece de su lengua propia para transmitirla y usarla en todos los ámbitos.

La autora utiliza como referencia su propia experiencia al haber transmitido su lengua alemana a sus hijos a pesar de vivir en un contexto castellanizado. Pero especialmente hace referencia a madres y padres que siendo de lengua materna originaria, pero viviendo en medios urbanos sin apenas presencia de estas lenguas, deciden socializar a sus hijos en quechua o aimara, lo que automáticamente los convierte en sujetos bilingües alfabetizados. Esta toma de conciencia y esta intervención de los miembros

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (36)

36 INTRODUCCIÓN

de la comunidad, de lengua materna indígena, pero bilingües y con formación universitaria resulta mucho más efectiva. En efecto, en las escuelas llamadas bilingües, donde teóricamente se persigue el mantenimiento de la lengua indígena, no se logra que la comunidad y tampoco los niños asuman esa lengua y esas culturas como propias y la corriente de desplazamiento de la propia lengua por la lengua dominante sigue creciendo.

Lo más interesante resulta el hecho de que las comunidades, al asumir su rol de agentes activos de revitalización lingüística, son más eficientes en el proceso de revitalización de su lengua y además se convierten en agentes de desarrollo general. Desarrollo que es sostenible naturalmente porque la comunidad se siente directamente implicada y no está a la espera de los agentes externos, académicos, económicos o políticos. Como añade la autora “son las personas, madres y padres quienes recurren al potencial descolonizador del uso y transmisión de las lenguas indígenas, a lo subversivo, al redescubrimiento de la identidad negada o prohibida o invisibilizada, a la audibilidad de sus lenguas maternas”.

Como colofón de este volumen contamos con la contribución de Patxi Baztarrika sobre “El modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística y desarrollo sostenible”. Baztarrika es especialista en Política Lingüística, particularmente de la vasca, no en vano ha sido Viceconsejero de Política Lingüística del Gobierno Vasco durante ocho años (2005 -2009 y 2012 – 2016), pero conoce también bien las políticas lingüistas europeas ya que ha presidido el NDLP (Network to Promote Linguistic Diversity – Red para la promoción de la diversidad lingüística en Europa) en el período 2015 – 2017.

Como editora de este volumen que nace desde la reflexión de la Cátedra sobre el valor de la diversidad lingüística y de su defensa como factor de desarrollo, nos complace contar con la aportación de Baztarrika sobre el modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística. Creemos que el proceso que se está desarrollando en el País Vasco para la normalización del euskera, su lengua originaria, constituye un ejemplo importante que demuestra cómo las lenguas pueden influir en la transformación de la sociedad y Baztarrika es una de las personas que mejor conoce dicho proceso. Además, su presentación sobre la influencia de la revitalización del euskera abarca ámbitos del desarrollo diferentes a los tradicionales. Este mismo volumen es una muestra de cómo la mayoría de los autores hace referencia fundamentalmente al ámbito educativo. Confirmamos la importancia de garantizar sistemas docentes que aseguren la enseñanza de las lenguas originarias al tiempo que posibiliten la formación bi-plurilingüe de todos los sujetos sean indígenas o no. Consideramos que es un reto difícil pero fundamental para garantizar la pervivencia de la diversidad lingüística. No obstante, cuando una comunidad, una sociedad, decide que quiere que su lengua primigenia se desarrolle como cualquier lengua sin renunciar al conocimiento y uso de otras lenguas, sean de contacto o internacionales, hay que transformar todos los estamentos sociales. La revitalización de una lengua minorizada es una tarea transversal que repercute en todo; es por ello que se convierte en un factor de desarrollo sostenible. Baztarrika nos ofrece una descripción detallada y documentada

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (37)

37ITZIAR IDIAZABAL

con rigor de los cambios sociales que se han producido gracias o en torno al proceso de normalización del euskera. El autor define el modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística como “un modelo de sociedad establecido sobre criterios de igualdad de derechos y oportunidades para toda la ciudadanía, basado en un Pacto Social referido a la cuestión lingüística y que responde a un elevado consenso social y político” y creemos que acierta en su descripción.

Sabemos que las circunstancias de cada lengua, de cada comunidad lingüística, son específicas, pero creemos que conocer al otro puede ayudar a conocerse a sí mismo, no para repetir sino para encontrar su propio camino. Este ha sido el objetivo de este libro. Conocer y dar a conocer cómo se puede abordar la defensa de la diversidad lingüística, al tiempo que se abordan alternativas para que las poblaciones herederas de ese patrimonio sigan aportando cultura y conocimiento original al mundo, reviertan la tendencia de pérdida, y generen a su vez desarrollo sostenible empezando por sus propias comunidades.

Creemos que las aportaciones que tan generosamente hemos recibido de los especialistas convocados, abordan de manera magistral la mayoría de los factores implicados en esta desafiante empresa. Desde la Cátedra UNESCO de Patrimonio Lingüístico Mundial de la UPV/EHU no nos queda sino agradecer de todo corazón la oportunidad que nos ofrecen para saber más y poder así seguir incidiendo de manera más eficaz en la tarea en la que seguiremos involucrados.

Bibliografía

Beacco, J.-C., Byram, M., Cavalli, M., Coste, D., Cuenat. M.-E., Goullier, F. & Panthier, J. et al, (2010) Guide pour le developpement et la mise en oeuvre de curriculums pour une éducation plurilingüe et interculturelle. Strasbourg: Conseil de l’Europe.

Benson, C. (2016). Adressing language of instruction issues in education: Recommendations for documenting progress. UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report. Obtenido en http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002455/245575E.pdf

Idiazabal, I. Manterola, I. & Diaz de Gereñu, L.( 2015) “ Objetivos y recursos diddácticos para la enseñanza plurilingüe”, in I. Garcia-Azkoaga & I. Idiazabal (Eds. ) Para una Ingenieria Didáctica de la Educación Plurilingüe, Bilbao: Servicio Editorial de la Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), 39-60.

Idiazabal, I., (2017) ¿Qué significa la escuela bilingüe para lenguas minorizadas como el Nasa Yuwe o el euskera? Onomázein N.º especial | Las lenguas amerindias en Iberoamérica: retos para el siglo XXI: 137 - 152

Bokova, Irina, UNESCO 2011, Mother tong international day, Obtenido de https://unesdoc. unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000191071

Bokova, Irina, UNESCO 2014, Mother tong international day, Obtenido

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (38)

38 INTRODUCCIÓN

de http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-mother-language-day-2014/

Marinotti, João Pedro (Ed.) (2017) Final Report of the Symposium on Language, the Sustainable Development Goals, and Vulnerable Populations New York, 11- 12 May 2017 Edited by City University of New York, Obtenido de http://www. languageandtheun.org/documents.html.

Martí F., Ortega, P. Idiazabal I., Barreña, A., Juaristi, P., Junyent, C., Uranga, B. & Amorrortu, E. (Ed.) (2005). Words and Worlds. World Language

Review: Clevedon U.K.: Multilingual Matters.Ouane, A. & Glanz, C. (2010). Why and how Africa should invest in

African languages and multilingual education. UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. Obtenido de http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001886/188642e.pdf

Objetivos de desarrollo sostenible (ODS). Obtenido de https://unctad.org/meetings/es/SessionalDocuments/ares70d1es.pdf

UNESCO Bangkok (2012). Why language matters for the Millennium Development Goals Obtenido de http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002152/215296E.pdf

UNESCO International Mother Language Day 2018 Obtenido de https://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-celebrates-power-mother-languages-build-peace-and-sustainability

UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger- Atlas UNESCO de las lenguas del mundo en peligro (Moseley, 2009)

Uranga, B. (2013) Propuesta para la integración del criterio lingüístico en proyectos de cooperación para el desarrollo. Bilbao: UNESCO Etxea.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (39)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (40)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM: GLOBAL LANGUAGE JUSTICE

INSIDE THE DOUGHNUT HOLE

Suzanne Romaine

Summary: This chapter proposes a doughnut as a model for thinking about the relationship between language and inequality in a linguistically diverse world and for explaining why language is the missing link in the global debate on sustainability, equity and poverty. By suggesting how human well-being can exist only within limits that are both social and ecological, the doughnut highlights the importance of addressing environmental sustainability and linguistic justice together. Policies that discriminate against the languages of the marginalized poor severely compromise the power of global development agendas like the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to improve their lives. The cross-cutting effects of linguistic diversity on all aspects of human welfare mean that global development agendas cannot reach the ‘bottom billion’ until they speak to them in their own languages. Changing the normative perspective to make room for global language justice inside the doughnut requires teasing out and understanding numerous complex linkages between language, poverty, education, health, gender, and the environment that have been rendered invisible by prevailing models and discourses of development. I will also identify some specific pathways and policies for sustaining linguistic diversity through explicit recognition of language as both a right and means of inclusive sustainable development.

Keywords: linguistic diversity, multilingualism, sustainable development, social justice, SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals), MDGs (Millennium Development Goals), EFA (Education for All).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (41)

41SUZANNE ROMAINE

DIVERSIDAD LINGÜÍSTICA, SOSTENIBILIDAD Y MULTILINGÜISMO: JUSTICIA LINGÜÍSTICA GLOBAL DENTRO DEL AGUJERO DEL DONUT

Resumen: Este capítulo propone un donut como modelo para pensar sobre las relaciones entre el lenguaje y la desigualdad en un mundo lingüísticamente diverso y para explicar por qué el lenguaje es el eslabón perdido en el debate de la sostenibilidad, de la equidad y de la pobreza. Se sugiere que el bienestar humano sólo puede existir dentro de los límites que son a la vez sociales y ecológicos; el donut subraya la importancia de abordar conjuntamente la sostenibilidad ambiental y la justicia lingüística. Las políticas que discriminan contra las lenguas de los pobres marginalizados comprometen seriamente el poder que puedan tener las agendas de desarrollo globales tales como los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODSs) para poder mejorar sus vidas. El efecto transversal de la diversidad lingüística implica todos los aspectos del bienestar humano y significa que las agendas de desarrollo global no pueden llegar al fondo del problema hasta que no se hable con los empobrecidos en sus propias lenguas. Cambiar de perspectiva normativa para que la justicia lingüística global tenga un sitio en el donut significa desentrañar y entender las numerosas y complejas relaciones que existen entre el lenguaje, la educación, la salud, el género y el medio ambiente y que han sido invisibilizadas en los discursos de los modelos de desarrollo dominantes. Identificaré también algunas vías políticas específicas que permitirían la sostenibilidad de la diversidad lingüística a través del reconocimiento del lenguaje, tanto como derecho, como medio para un desarrollo inclusivo y sostenible.

Palabras clave: diversidad lingüística, multilingüismo, desarrollo sostenible, justicia social, ODS (Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible), ODM (Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio), EPT (Educación para Todos).

Introduction

I begin by introducing a doughnut as a model for thinking about the relationship between language and inequality in a linguistically diverse world and for explaining why language is the missing link in the global debate on sustainability, equity and poverty. The doughnut is a metaphor suggesting how human well-being can exist only within limits that are both social and ecological. Introduced by Raworth (2012) and further developed in Raworth (2017), the model has two dark green concentric rings. The inner ring is humanity’s social foundation, below which lie critical deprivations like poverty, hunger, illiteracy and poor health. The outer ring is the ecological ceiling, beyond which lies environmental degradation like biodiversity loss and climate change. Between the two rings is the safe and just space where inclusive,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (42)

42 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

sustainable development takes place, a place where we can meet the needs of all within the means of the planet. Raworth intends it primarily as a heuristic device to reframe 21st century economic thinking by setting out a vision rather than a fully worked out economic theory laying out specific pathways and policies. Although she does not mention language, I want to bring global language justice into the model by situating LANGUAGE in red inside the doughnut as a way of moving beyond her vision to identifying specific pathways and evidence-based policies for sustaining linguistic diversity (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Global language justice inside the doughnut, adapted from Raworth (2017)

Raworth (2017:5) introduces another insightful metaphor when she observes “economics is the mother tongue of public policy…. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality, and other environmental and social challenges that define our times.” If economics is the mother tongue of public policy, that economics must be multilingual and public policy

in our linguistically diverse world must rest on explicit recognition of language as both a right and means of inclusive sustainable development. For me, that is the essence of global language justice.

Policies that discriminate against the languages of the marginalized poor severely compromise the power of global development agendas to improve their lives. The cross- cutting effects of linguistic diversity on all aspects of human welfare mean that these agendas cannot reach the ‘bottom billion’ until they speak to them in their own languages. Nowhere is this clearer than in ambitious programs like the United Nations’s (UN) 17 Sustainable

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (43)

43SUZANNE ROMAINE

Development Goals (SDGs), which replaced the expiring 8 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2016, and now set the global development agenda for the next 15 years. Meanwhile, the Education for All (EFA) agenda also came to an end with the launching of a new Education 2030 Framework for Action. This new vision for education pledged to leave no one behind and embraces SDG-4 to ensure equitable and inclusive quality education and lifelong learning for all by 2030 (UNESCO 2015a). To see where and how the poor get left behind, let us take a brief snapshot of the unfinished business and unkept promises of the expired MDG and EFA agendas to examine why language matters.

Where and how the poor get left behind

Even as global poverty levels continue falling, we are failing to reach the most vulnerable. The MDG era ending in 2015 left nearly a billion extremely poor people living under the international poverty line of less than $1.25/day and at the end of 2017, 262 million (one out of five) children and adolescents remain out of school. The overwhelming majority of poor people live in two regions—Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa—they make up about 80% of the global total of extremely poor people. The most disadvantaged children are those still furthest from achieving universal primary completion. The poorest regions, not coincidentally, also have the highest number of children out of school and the lowest literacy rates (UIS 2018:10). Figure 2a, showing the Human Development Index (HDI), and Figure 2b, showing adult and youth literacy rates, highlight essentially the same geographic areas in shades of orange and yellow, where the poor get left behind. HDI is a composite indicator covering three dimensions of human welfare: gross national income per capita, mean years of schooling for adults aged 25 years and older, and life expectancy at birth, with countries ranking from 1 (Norway) to 188 (Niger).

Figure 2a. Human Development Index based on data from UNDP (2015)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (44)

44 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

Figure 2b. Adult and youth literacy rates in 2016 (UIS 2017a:4)

Looking at progress toward global development goals in piecemeal fashion by focusing on one target or indicator at a time misses the larger picture of cumulative disadvantage experienced by particular groups. Changing the normative perspective to make room for language inside the doughnut requires teasing out and understanding numerous complex linkages between language, poverty, education, health, gender, and the environment that have been rendered invisible by prevailing models and discourses of development (Romaine 2013). When we ask what language has to do with sustainable development, the short answer is EVERYTHING if we look at WHO got left behind by the MDGs and EFA. This is where language comes prominently into the picture. As the rich get richer, the poor do not remain merely poor: they become even poorer as they wind up in what Collier (2007) called the ‘bottom billion’ left behind by development. Not only does a rising tide fail to lift all boats, it swamps the poorest and weakest of them in its backwash. As Ed Milliband (2013), former UK Labour Party Leader, put it, now the rising tide just seems to lift the yachts. A vicious circle of intersecting disadvantages pushes language minorities into this ‘bottom billion’. Speaking a minority language constitutes an economic, social and health risk because ethnolinguistic minorities comprise a large proportion of the bottom 20% still living in extreme poverty, suffering from poor health, lack of education and deteriorating environments. This sums up in a nutshell where we are today. Proceeding without a change in policy and practice, especially in the education sector, makes it likely that linguistic minorities will continue to be the majority of those still living in poverty beyond 2030. The UN must do more than simply renew or repledge itself to the same framework. Bad policies, no matter how well funded, will not work. This is why.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (45)

45SUZANNE ROMAINE

With nearly ¾ of the world’s 7,000+ languages concentrated into a small number of biodiversity ‘hotspots’ inhabited by some of the poorest peoples, the fate of most of our planet’s biological, linguistic (and, by implication, its cultural) diversity lies in the hands of a small number of the world’s poorest people most vulnerable to pressures of globalization and most marginalized by inequality of access to development. Both are heavily concentrated through the tropics. Animal and plant species are now being lost at a rate 1,000 times greater than historic background levels (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2005), and 25% to 90% of the world’s 7,000 some languages may soon vanish (Nettle and Romaine 2000). Most are spoken by small group, are unwritten, undocumented, and endemic, i.e. found nowhere else. With both species and languages facing similar threats and experiencing rapid declines in the same places, we are on the edge of a ‘tipping point’ into a fundamentally less diverse world. What happens in these hotspots of biocultural diversity will determine the immediate welfare of millions, and ultimately the future diversity of life on Earth (Gorenflo et al. 2012).

Maintaining this biocultural diversity is inextricably linked to the survival of numerous small indigenous communities, whose subsistence lifestyles depend on healthy ecosystems. Without such resources they find it hard to maintain their lifeways and cultural identities on which continued transmission and vitality of their languages depend. Comprising 15% of the world’s poor and 1/3 of the world’s 900 million extremely poor rural people, indigenous peoples live on lands containing about 80% of the world’s biodiversity and speak around 60% of the world’s languages, many of them at risk of extinction (Nettle and Romaine 2000). The poor are enmeshed in a vicious cycle where environmental degradation exacerbates poverty and poverty exacerbates environmental degradation. Climate change provides one of the clearest demonstrations of global inequality and injustice. The richest 10% of the global population are responsible for half of all total emissions, but the poorest communities who have contributed least to climate change are already feeling the most severe impacts (Oxfam 2016:4, 27).

Thanks largely to the dominant focus of development policies that have pushed economic growth at the expense of the environment, we have already breached the doughnut’s outer boundary in several places, e.g. climate change and biodiversity loss. Meanwhile, the bottom billion live inside the doughnut hole below the minimum social foundation of well-being. The current economic system is failing the majority of people and failing the planet. What can we do? And why does linguistic diversity matter? No true development without linguistic development.

There can be no true development without linguistic development. With the most linguistically diverse countries containing 72% of children out-of-school worldwide (Pinnock 2009), there is a strong overlap between the geography of education disadvantage and linguistic diversity. Most languages are currently excluded from education and other higher domains of public life. While virtually everyone acknowledges clear links between a good education and a broad range of benefits impacting poverty, health, and

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (46)

46 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

gender inequality, there is limited recognition of the role language plays as an intervening variable in the development process. Failure to take language into account means that the goal of education for all translates into schooling for some.

The result is a lost generation of children in the world’s poorest countries whose life chances have been irreparably damaged by failure to protect their right to quality education. No country has achieved sustained economic growth without achieving near universal primary education, but the vast majority of countries failed to achieve this goal. Since 2008 progress in reducing the number of children out-of-school has stalled, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, which has over half (ca. 34 million) of these, and more than half (55%) are girls (UIS 2018:5). The global total of 262 million includes 64 million children of primary school age (9% of this age group), 61 million young adolescents of lower secondary school age (16%) and 138 million youth of upper secondary school age (37%) are not in school (UNESCO 2017:118; UIS 2018).More than one-quarter of the world’s children out of school are unlikely ever to enter, including as many as one third of those out of school in sub-Saharan Africa, and as many as one quarter in South and Central Asia (UIS 2017a:9). Globally, it is the poor who miss out on school (UIS 2017a:14). Getting more of these children into school without changing the language of instruction will not solve the problem. Providing quality education to the poorest requires teaching them through the language they understand best (Ball 2010; Walter and Benson 2012). Nevertheless, this commonsense principle is still the exception rather than the rule worldwide.

Let us focus briefly on the development landscape in Africa to show how this vicious circle plays out in the linguistically richest and economically poorest region on earth. With 1/3 of the world’s languages, and nearly 1/3 of the world’s poor surviving on less than $1.25/ day, Africa is particularly disadvantaged. The so-called Africanization of poverty underlines the enormity of the gap between Africa and developed countries on virtually all dimensions of human welfare. With the highest proportion of people (87%) without access to mother tongue education, some 90% of Africans have no knowledge of the official language of their country even though it is presumed to be the vehicle of communication between government and its citizens (UNDP 2004:34). While African languages have many speakers, low literacy rates mean Africa has few readers and writers in any language. Africa’s marginalization from development processes is perpetuated by its almost complete exclusion from the global cultural flow of information. This leaves the majority of Africans disempowered and disenfranchised from full political participation.

When Wittgenstein (1921/1961:5, 6) wrote “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world”, he was not referring to Wikipedia. However, Wikipedia is only as rich as your language. A majority of its content is about a relatively small part of our planet and available in only a handful of the world’s languages. Africa is the second-largest and second most populous continent with over 1 billion people and 30% of the world’s languages. Yet, while African languages have many speakers, low literacy rates mean Africa

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (47)

47SUZANNE ROMAINE

has few readers and writers in any language. Even if the infrastructure existed and Africans could afford to access the internet, closing the digital divide means going the language last mile. Fifty million Hausa speakers have a scant 1500 articles compared to nearly half a million for only 5 million Norwegian speakers (Wikipedia 2018).

Girls are the first to be excluded. Gender inequalities are the most pervasive of all inequalities. SDG-5 (achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls) builds on some of the targets that began with the MDGs and EFA and there are very strong interlinkages between SDG-5 and the other SDGs. Gender parity in education has been seen as a crucial indicator of gender equality overall and was an intermediate goal to be achieved by 2005, well ahead of the other goals. In 2014 2/3 of the primary school-age cohort unlikely to ever enroll in school were girls (UNESCO 2016a:180); five million more girls than boys of primary school age are out of school than boys (UNESCO 2017:125). The poorest girls are almost 9 times as likely never to have set foot in a classroom as the richest boys. In Guinea and Niger in 2012, over 70% of the poorest girls had never attended primary school, compared with less than 20% of the richest boys (UNESCO 2015b:153). At current rates of progress (or lack of it), the richest boys in sub-Saharan Africa will achieve universal primary education by 2021, but the poorest girls will not do so until 2086 (UNESCO/UNICEF 2015:56, 61).

Speaking a minority language further compounds female marginalization. Minority girls face numerous disadvantages, both as a group and as a subgroup of the disadvantaged. Nearly three-quarters of girls out-of-school belong to ethnic, religious, linguistic, or other minorities (Lewis and Lockheed 2006). In sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest girls remain the most likely to never attend primary school. More than 9 million girls in sub- Saharan Africa are expected never to enroll in school. Fewer than half of poor rural females have basic literacy skills. Nigeria has a female youth literacy rate of only 58%. Sixty-five percent of Hausa speakers, who comprise one-fifth of the population, have no education. Moreover, 97% of poor Hausa-speaking girls and over 90% of rural Hausa women between the ages of 17 to 22 have fewer than two years of education (UNESCO 2010:60, 152, 167).

The push toward universal primary education in the context of the MDGs and EFA obscures an even greater crisis, especially for the poorest and most marginalized. Added to millions not in school are more than 617 million (or 6 out of 10) children and adolescents around the world who have not achieved basic literacy and numeracy skills due to poor quality of schooling. This includes more than 387 million children of primary school age and 230 million adolescents of lower secondary school age. More than one-half (56%) of all children will not be able to read or handle mathematics with proficiency by the time they complete primary education. More than 85% of children in sub-Saharan Africa are not meeting the minimum standards, and girls of primary school age are the most disadvantaged. Central and Southern Asia have the second highest proportion of those not learning (UIS 2017c:2, 7). In North America and Europe 96% achieve the minimum benchmark for

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (48)

48 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

reading by grade 4. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the region with the lowest youth literacy rate, only 40% do and even fewer than 40% do in south and west Asia (UNESCO 2014:191). With “business as usual” progress, it would take a century or more for many developing countries to reach current OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) means set in international assessments like PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) and TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study). Some countries would never catch up. This is true especially for the poorest and for girls.

The cost of being left behind

Literacy is key to sustainable development. It is a core component of the right to education and an indispensable prerequisite to lifelong learning. The Dakar Framework for Action stressed the importance of local languages for initial literacy (UNESCO 2000). Even a 10% increase in the share of students achieving basic literacy translates into an annual growth rate that is 0.3 percentage points higher than it would otherwise be (Cree, Kay, and Steward 2012). Illiteracy is costly, both for developing countries, which lose up to 2% of GDP, and for the global economy, which loses as much as $1.19 trillion. Countries that have succeeded in raising literacy rates by 20% to 30% have also experienced GDP increases of 8% to 16%, with the strongest relationships in African countries (Wheeler 1980). Illiteracy is costly, for individuals who earn 30%-42% less than their literate counterparts, as well as for developing countries, which lose up to 2% of GDP, and for the global economy, which loses as much as $1.2 trillion (Cree, Kay, and Steward 2012).

No country has achieved continuous and rapid economic growth without first having at least 40% of adults able to read and write. EFA-4 aimed to increase adult literacy, but this was one of the most neglected goals. The global adult illiteracy rate fell by only 23% by 2015, far short of the 50% target, and only one quarter of countries achieved the target. This leaves 750 million adults, nearly 2/3 of them women, who lack basic literacy skills. Half of women in South and West Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa cannot read or write (UNESCO 2015b:22; UIS 2017a). Adult illiteracy is a legacy of inequalities and restricted educational opportunities beginning in childhood. New illiterates continue to enter adulthood when schooling fails to ensure all who complete primary school achieve sustained literacy. If all children who entered school after 2000 left literate, this would be reflected in rapidly falling adult illiteracy. However, this proportion has not changed since 2009. An important reason why is the increasing share of population in sub Saharan Africa, the region with both the highest illiteracy rate (41%), the slowest progress, and failure to deliver mother tongue education. Things will get even worse as the population in Africa is expected to quadruple by 2100 (United Nations 2017).

The cost of being left behind by these inequities in access to good quality education that could provide knowledge and skills is high indeed- as

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (49)

49SUZANNE ROMAINE

high as human life itself because health is related to every other aspect of development. Africa carries the highest burden of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, accounting for more than half of all cases and deaths worldwide. The global burden of malaria mortality and morbidity is also highest in Africa. The same groups most marginalized by the education gap– namely, poor girls and women, especially those belonging to ethnic and linguistic minorities, and residing in rural areas, are also less likely to know how to prevent infection and spread of HIV. This knowledge is vital to MDG-6 and the new, more general SDG-3 of good health and well-being to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases. HIV is the leading cause of death for women of reproductive age worldwide. AIDS remains the number one killer of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, disproportionately affecting girls and women. In sub-Saharan African countries with available data in 2014, only 30% of young women and 37% of young men had comprehensive correct knowledge of HIV (United Nations 2015:45).

From 2014 to 2016 the deadliest outbreak of Ebola in history killed ca. 11,300 people, robbing a generation of children of a year’s education and further undermining an already weak healthcare system in the three most affected countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. The Ebola crisis was also very much a communications crisis. The problem was indeed, how to spread the word, as this poster distributed by the Liberian government put it, especially in highly multilingual West Africa with adult literacy rates below 48%, even less for the poor, for women and for those in rural areas in these 3 countries. Officially, two of the three countries (Sierra Leone and Liberia) are English-speaking and the other Guinea, French speaking. In Liberia, only 20% of the population speaks English. Untranslated posters, flyers, banners and billboards aimed at educating the public are, in fact, serving only the minority elite because they are the ones who speak English. For the vast majority of West Africans, English information is of no more use than Swahili would be in the United Kingdom. One of the main areas of criticism has been the initial slow response when the disease took hold in spring 2014. Claudia Evers, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola emergency coordinator in Guinea, said: “In the first nine months, if people had been given (these) proper messages, all this could have been prevented” (Berger and Tang 2015). Information provided in languages and formats people can understand can help save lives in a crisis, but language is usually not seen as a priority in emergency responses. Misinformation, mistrust, fear and panic spread quickly, leading people to hide their sick and bury bodies secretly. Mother tongue–based multilingual education as the foundation for an egalitarian theory of social justice.

This is where the notion of global language justice inside the doughnut comes back into the picture. Deeply entrenched disparities in development outcomes of the type I have outlined reveal how far removed we are from satisfying the requirements of an egalitarian theory of social justice based on the premise that a society of equals is one where disadvantages do not cluster and there is no clear answer to the question of who is worse off (Wolff and de-Shalit 2007:10). Tackling these inequalities is key to getting everyone inside the doughnut. The most urgent task for an egalitarian theory of

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (50)

50 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

practice capable of offering guidance to policy makers is to identify the worst off and take immediate steps to improve their position (ibid:4). We know who is worst off, and I have identified some of the key linguistic dimensions to these inequalities. The exclusion of up to 90% of the world’s languages from education constitutes linguistic and social injustice. The groups most impacted by injustices in language policy and planning especially in education are the rural poor (women and girls in particular), who speak languages not represented in formal structures. As long as education relies mainly on international languages at the expense of local vernaculars, education will reproduce rather than reduce these inequalities, making sustainable and equitable development difficult, if not impossible, to achieve. What can we do? Because language impacts the whole development enterprise, increasing linguistic diversity, especially through implementing multilingual language policies in the education sector, is key not only to progress with social justice but also to inclusive economic growth.

Children can more easily acquire literacy in a language they already know. This leads to more effective education, contributing to poverty reduction and development, especially for girls and women. Mother tongue programs can produce competent readers in 2 to 3 three years rather than the 5 or more typical of many second-language programs. In countries where children average only 5 years of school and the poorest even fewer, mother tongue programs present the only possibility for the majority of children attending school to achieve even a modest level of literacy. Many children are still learning the alphabet in Grade 3, so the first two grades are lost years for learning the content required by the curriculum. Early exit models of mother tongue instruction that transition to English or other international languages in Primary 3, allow insufficient time for students to develop literacy skills in their own language that can be transferred to learning to read English, putting them at risk of never developing advanced literacy. Research shows that the more highly developed children’s mother tongues are, the more prepared they will be to acquire second languages successfully. Submersion models that plunge children into a second language with no instruction or support in their first language are a recipe for persistent, if not permanent, underdevelopment. They will continue to produce a large underclass of almost 90% who will finish below the mean, with insufficient skills for doing little but manual labor (Walter 2008:128-140).

Many African scholars blame bad language policies for leaving the majority of Africans behind. Alexander (2008:60) claims that language policy in postcolonial Africa, with hardly any exception, has been an unmitigated disaster. The perpetuation of colonial languages as official and/or national languages is one of the key reasons ‘why the majority of African people are left on the edge of the road’ (Djité 2008:133). Across a continent with very high repetition and drop-out rates and fewer than 50% of African pupils remaining to the end of primary school, more than five decades of instruction through English (or indeed other European languages like French and Portuguese) has done and can do little for most students; 80% to 90% of the population still has not learned European languages (Alidou et al. 2006). Even in South Africa,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (51)

51SUZANNE ROMAINE

where English has been a school subject for more than 100 years, and English is widely spoken in the larger society, proficiency is still very low among the poorest, predominantly black population speaking African languages. Income inequality is also significantly higher in countries using colonial languages as the medium of instruction (Coyne 2015).

Because language impacts the whole development enterprise, language matters more than ever to SDG Goal 17 - creating global partnerships for sustainable development. Global development agendas cannot reach the ‘bottom billion’ without speaking to them in their own languages. What are the prospects in the SDG agenda for tackling these inequalities, especially inequities in education arising from unjust language policies that combine to trap the poorest people in a cluster of disadvantages persisting across generations?

The Incheon Declaration adopted at the 2015 World Education Forum recognized that “inclusion and equity in and through education is the cornerstone of a transformative education agenda.” Countries committed to “making the necessary changes in education policies” to address exclusion, marginalization and inequities. To ensure that no one is left behind, they pledged that “no education target should be considered met unless met for all” (UNESCO 2015a:iv). There is consensus at virtually every level, from the poorest family in the most remote village to the global policy leaders who are shaping the world’s future development goals: education matters (UNESCO/UNICEF 2015:7). Why can’t we build on this consensus and open the school house door to examine the language of instruction?

Quality education delivers a range of monetary and nonmonetary returns benefiting individuals and communities, but educating children in a language they do not understand results in poor outcomes. Investing in the development of local languages in the context of high quality, well-resourced mother tongue–based multilingual education (MTB-MLE) lays the foundation for sound economic policy for promoting long-term sustainable development. Although at first glance it might seem easier and more cost-effective to immerse children as early as possible in the national and/or international languages they will eventually need for accessing wider opportunities and participating in national life beyond their communities, especially when school provides the only context for learning them, the added expenditure entailed by moving from a monolingual to a bilingual education system is much smaller than commonly believed. Where evaluations have been made, they suggest additional costs of around 3% to 4% above that of monolingual schooling. This estimate does not take into account the fact that using more of children’s first language in school is likely to lead to more effective learning of additional languages and to reduced repetition and dropout rates, resulting in significant cost savings to education budgets. Laitin and Ramachandran (2016:458) estimate that if a country like Zambia were to adopt Mambwe instead of English as its official language, it would move up 44 positions on the HDI ranking and become similar to a country like Paraguay in human development levels. In Ethiopia, where mother tongue instruction was introduced in 1994,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (52)

52 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

it has had a positive effect at all levels of schooling, leading to a 12% increase in the number of students completing six years or more of schooling, and up to an additional year of school. Ability to read also correlated with a 25% increase in newspaper readership, which has been found to be positively correlated with measures of social capital and electoral participation. Mother tongue instruction can also lead to lower dropout rates, especially for girls (Benson 2005).

Yet many countries continue to make poor choices based on ignorance, misguided political ideologies, poor governance, corruption, and military conflict (Romaine 2015). Unsound policies preventing quality education from reaching the most linguistically diverse populations have never realized a positive return on investment in educational, social, or economic terms despite the significant financial and donor resources funneled into them. Failing to educate large numbers of young people results in unemployment, lost earnings, hopelessness and instability. Being out of school has repercussions lasting over the lifetime of individuals and over generations for societies as educational disadvantage is transferred from parents to children. Globally, earnings increase for each additional year of schooling by 10% on average and even more for girls and poor regions like Sub-Saharan Africa (Montenegro and Patrinos 2014; UNESCO 2016a:58) A one-year increase in the average educational attainment of a country’s population increases annual per capita GDP growth from 2% to 2.5% (UNESCO 2014:151).

UNESCO (1953) called for mother tongue education decades ago, and in other more recent documents (UNESCO 2003), but a policy paper estimated that 2.3 billion people, nearly 40% of the world’s population, still lack access to education in their own languages (UNESCO 2016b). Other IGOs and NGOs are also doing sterling work, but there has been relatively little coordination among donor responses. Even the World Bank, the biggest international donor to education, issued its Education Note in 2005, arguing that mother tongue education should be a part of its dialogue with educators and policy-makers (Bender et al. 2005). Yet when the World Bank (2011) spearheaded a new education initiative and laid out its development strategy for achieving learning for all, there was no mention of language or literacy policy or language of instruction. In its 2018 World Development Report the World Bank (2018:135) devoted only one text box (6.3) to reaching learners in their own language, noting that children learn to read more effectively in their mother tongue.

The Incheon Declaration mentions bi- and multilingual education policies to address exclusion and encourages teaching and learning in home languages in multilingual contexts. It also recognizes the role of first languages in literacy. It proposes using as an indicator the percent of students in primary education whose first language is the language of instruction, noting however, that measures of home language and language of instruction will be required to develop a global measurement tool (UNESCO 2015a:Annex II, iii). UNESCO’s Global Education Monitoring Report has adopted this as thematic indicator 18. While acknowledging that tracking language of instruction is fraught with

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (53)

53SUZANNE ROMAINE

technical and political challenges, UNESCO (2016a:255, 267-170) stresses that countries and regions need to tackle this issue head-on if no one is to be left behind. Language policies also need to be monitored and language of assessment matters too. We can lobby Ministries of Education to conduct school censuses that include language data and we can also encourage researchers and NGOs doing household surveys of various kinds to collect information on language. Surveys often report the languages spoken at home, but information is rarely collected on the language of instruction at school—information that is crucial to understand the impact of language barriers on school attendance. Because those furthest behind tend to be members of more than one disadvantaged group and suffer from multiple, overlapping forms of marginalization, we still need better indicators to measure exclusion from education and to understand how poverty, gender, ethnicity, language and geographic location intersect.

We also need to lobby Ministries of Education, policy makers and donors and funders like the World Bank to convince them that money spent on multilingual education is a wise investment for promoting long-term sustainable development. Poor countries need to be prioritized and we need to earmark funds for multilingual education. In December 2017 the World Bank gave Ethiopia $300,000 to improve provision of quality education. Norway designated mother tongue education as one of its development policy priorities for 2017. Overall, however, aid to education has been declining and is far too low to meet the new targets for 2015-2030. Aid would need to increase at least six-fold to fill the US$39 billion annual gap (UNESCO 2016a:340).

Unfortunately, I am not optimistic about this happening on a large enough scale without a lot of targeted advocacy. I am also not so naïve to think that simply increasing access to good quality MTB-MLE education will provide a magic road to sustainable development. Political factors play a far greater role in selecting and implementing actual policies than do considerations of social justice or minority language rights (Romaine 2015). There are critical limitations of language policy as an agent of change when political, socioeconomic, and ideological currents are flowing in a contrary direction. Many countries will continue to make poor choices. Meanwhile, the rush to adopt English as a medium of education around the world at increasingly earlier ages virtually guarantees that most children in the poorest countries, especially in Africa and South Asia, will be left behind. More importantly, however, although doughnut economics has been discussed in NGO circles, by governments, the World Bank and even the United Nations, it has not really transformed the overall SDG agenda into a convincing roadmap for sustainable development.

The 2015 MDG report on Africa (United Nations 2015:xviii) emphasized the need to focus on pathways and enablers rather than simply on outcomes. Targets and indicators need to be specific, measurable, realistic and relevant. Targets with little chance of being met in a fifteen year time-frame are unlikely to receive political commitment, support and cooperation from governments,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (54)

54 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

donors, NGOs and local communities. It is important to remember that the SDGs, like the MDGs and EFA, are a voluntary agreement among nations and do not have the force of international law. The more ambitious the proposed target, the more unlikely it is to be met. Many important concepts in the SDG-4 targets remain uncovered by relevant indicators and many important aspects of quality education would be difficult or impossible to measure (UNESCO 2016a:170).

Let us look briefly at SDG-4 for quality education, with its 10 targets and 11 indicators, for a few illustrations of why language matters. Target 4.1 is ambitious but quite unrealistic in its aim to ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary AND secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes. Given the data examined in precious sections, ensuring universal secondary education in the next fifteen years is clearly beyond the reach of most countries, when only 52% of countries managed to achieve universal primary education by 2015. At current trends and with no change in language policy, universal primary education will not be achieved until 2042 or beyond, with the poorest countries achieving this goal over 100 years later than the richest. Sub-Saharan Africa is projected not to reach universal primary completion until 2080. Even universal lower secondary completion is not projected to be reached in low and middle-income countries until the latter half of the 21st century. No country has yet achieved universal upper secondary education. Even at the fastest rate of progress, 1 in 10 countries in Europe and North America would not reach it by 2030 (UNESCO 2016a: 20, 150, 152). Other targets like 4.7 express a utopian vision that most would probably endorse, but it is too vague, too complex, and would be difficult to measure: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development. Interestingly, this is one of the few places where cultural diversity and culture’s contribution to sustainable development is mentioned. However, there are no indicators in the UN Statistical Commission’s list relating to this goal.

Although it has become increasingly accepted that economic growth must be socially and environmentally sustainable, it must be linguistically and culturally sustainable as well because the conservation of biodiversity, cultural-linguistic diversity and the welfare of the poor are inextricably linked. Cultural-linguistic diversity is an important missing dimension in the proposed 3-pillar model of sustainability incorporating economic, social, and environmental components. Moreover, as the MDG report on Africa (United Nations 2015:xviii) warned, global development agendas are unlikely to succeed unless underpinned by a credible and committed means of implementation that takes into account both financial and non-financial resources.

Let us look at poverty reduction, which is central to the post-2015 agenda, just as MDG-1 was the centerpiece of the MDGs. MDG-1 promised

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (55)

55SUZANNE ROMAINE

to reduce poverty by half, while the much more ambitious SDG-1 proposes to eradicate extreme poverty, defined by the poverty line of $1.25 per person per day. There are at least two ways in which poverty eradication could be accelerated: by increasing the growth rate of the global economy as a whole; or by increasing the share of global growth going to the poorest households (that is, by changing the global income distribution to benefit the poorest). Introducing more baked goods into the discussion as a way of looking at these choices, the options are to bake a bigger cake or to cut it up in a different way. Economist Anne Krueger, who worked for both the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, endorsed the prevailing model of economic development when she said in 2004: “The solution is more rapid growth—not a switch of emphasis towards more redistribution. Poverty reduction is best achieved through making the cake bigger, not by trying to cut it up in a different way.”

During the MDG years of 2000-2015, however, inequality reached new extremes. Instead of an economy that works for the prosperity of all, for future generations, and for the planet, we have instead created what Oxfam (2016) called “an economy for the 1%”. The poorest half of the world’s population received just 1% of the total increase in global wealth, while half of that increase went to the top 1%. If inequality within countries had not grown during that period, an extra 200 million people would have escaped poverty. That could have risen to 700 million if economic growth had benefitted poor people more than the rich from. Instead of trickling down, income and wealth are being sucked upwards at an alarming rate. The richest 1% now have more wealth than the rest of the world combined. In 2015, just 62 people (53 of them men) had the same wealth as 3.6 billion people – the bottom half of humanity. The average wealth of each adult belonging to the richest 1% is $1.7m, more than 300 times greater than the wealth of the average person in the poorest 90%. This did not just happen by accident. It is the result of policies favoring the dominant economic world order, which will never be inclusive or sustainable. Fraser Nelson (2015), editor of The Spectator, a weekly conservative magazine in the UK, ridiculed Oxfam for linking wealth and global poverty to convince us that “the poor are poor because the rich are rich: that wealth is a pie, and the powerful are helping themselves to an ever-larger slice”.

What happens if we continue to go for growth? Can we really have our cake or pie, and eat it too? At present levels of growth Woodward (2015) estimates that it would take at least 100 years for the poorest two-thirds of humanity to receive $1.25/day. For the poorest to receive a more realistic $5/day would take 200 years because the total poverty headcount would rise to 4.3 billion people, more than 60% of humanity. If we accelerated growth to try to eradicate poverty by 2030, at the $1.25/day level global gross domestic product (GDP) would need to increase to nearly 15 times its 2010 level and global per capita income would need to exceed $100,000. At the $5/day level, GDP would have to increase to 173 times and global per capita income would have to be no less than $1.3 million. Baking a cake this huge would undermine SDG-12 (Ensure responsible consumption and production) and SDG-13 (Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (56)

56 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

because it would entail an unsustainable increase in global production and consumption causing irreparable damage to ecosystems. Seen from the vantage of the doughnut model, planetary boundaries represent an oven that is too small to bake a larger cake. According to data provided by the Global Footprint Network, humanity is currently using nature 1.7 times faster than ecosystems can regenerate. This is akin to using 1.7 Earths. We would need at least 3.4 Earths to sustain this level of production and consumption — and this assumes that high-income countries slow their present growth rates to zero. The losers in such a scenario would again be the poorest whom we are trying to help, who live in areas most vulnerable to climate change, and are responsible for only around 10% of total global emissions but at the same time depend heavily on healthy ecosystems for their livelihoods.

If we ask whether the SDG agenda is sustainable, and in what way its vision of sustainable development differs from development, I conclude that the SDGs offer the disease as a cure: growth will solve the problems of poverty and the environmental crisis it has created in the first place. Relying on global growth to eradicate extreme poverty even by the highly restrictive $1.25 definition is not viable without increasing the share of the benefits of global growth to the world’s poorest by a factor of more than five. In other words, we would have to slice the cake or pie in a different way and decide how big a slice each of us can eat. This would require rethinking the global economy and our approach to development.

Rethinking development to make room for linguistic diversity and global language justice

The need to rethink our approach to development is what prompted my exploration of the doughnut model to make room for linguistic diversity and global language justice. The doughnut highlights the importance of addressing environmental sustainability and social justice together. This idea is not new. In fact, it goes back to the Brundtland Commission’s recognition of inequality as our planet’s main environmental problem and one of the early definitions of sustainable development as “progress that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (WCED 1987:6). Linguistic diversity lies at the crossroads of a critical pathway to sustainable and equitable development. As long as globalization continues to drive growth by destroying the environment, all the while failing to life the bottom billion, future generations will also inherit a more impoverished and drastically less diverse world as the future we want is jeopardized by the flattening of cultural-linguistic diversity. Making room inside the doughnut for global language justice requires changing the normative framework on sustainable development so that linguistic diversity and multilingualism are included in the future we want.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (57)

57SUZANNE ROMAINE

References

Alexander, N. (2008). The impact of the hegemony of English on access to and quality of education with special reference to South Africa. In W. Harbert, S. McConnell-Ginet, A.Miller, & J. Whitman (Eds.), Language and poverty (pp. 53–67). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Alidou, H., Boly, A., Brock-Utne, B., Diallo, Y.S., Heugh, K., & Wolff, H.E. (2006). Optimizing language and education in Africa—the language factor: A stock-taking research on mother tongue and bilingual education in sub-Saharan Africa. Paris: Association for the Development of Education in Africa.

Ball, J. (2010). Enhancing learning of children from diverse language back grounds: Mother tongue-based bilingual or multilingual education in the early years. Paris: UNESCO.

Bender, P., Dutcher, N., Klaus, D., Shore, J., & Tesar, C. (2005). In their own language: education for all. Education Notes. Washington, DC:World Bank.

Benson, C. (2005). Girls, educational equity and mother tongue-based tea ching. Bangkok: UNESCO.

Berger, N., & Tang, G. (2015). Ebola: a crisis of language. Retrieved from htps://odihpn.org/ magazine/ebola-a-crisis-of-language/

Collier, P. (2007). The bottom billion: Why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Coyne, G. (2015). Language education policies and inequality in Africa: Cross-national empirical evidence. Comparative Education Review, 59(4), 619-637.

Cree, A., Kay, A., & Steward, J. (2012). The economic and social cost of illiteracy: A snapshot of illiteracy in a global context. Melbourne: World

Literacy Foundation.Djité, P.G. (2008). From liturgy to technology. Modernizing the languages of Africa. Language Problems & Language Planning, 32(2), 133–52.Global Footprint Network. (n.d.) World footprint. Retrieved from https://www.

footprintnetwork. org/our-work/ecological-footprint/Gorenflo, LJ., Romaine, S., Mittermeier, R.A., & Painemilla, K.W. (2012). Co-

occurrence of linguistic and biological diversity in biodiversity hotspots and high biodiversity wilderness areas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(21), 8032–37.

Krueger, A.O. (2004). Letting the future in: India’s continuing reform agenda. Keynote speech to Stanford India Conference. Retrieved from https://

www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2015/09/28/04/53/sp060404Laitin, D.D., & Ramachandran, R. (2016). Language policy and human

development. American Political Science Review, 110(3), 457-480.Lewis, M., & Lockheed, M. (2006). Inexcusable absence: Why 60 million girls still aren’t in school and what to do about it. Washington, DC:Center

for Global Development.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (58)

58 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

MDG Report. (2015). Assessing progress in Africa toward the MDGs. Addis Ababa: United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, African Union, African Development Bank and United Nations Development Programme.

Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. (2005). Ecosystems and human well-being. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Milliband, Ed (2013). Speech to the Labour Party conference. Brighton.Montenegro, C.E., & Patrinos, H.A. (2014). Comparable estimates of returns

to schooling around the world. Policy Research Working Paper 7020. Washington, DC: World Bank. Education Global Practice Group.

Nelson, F. (2015). What Oxfam doesn’t want you to know: global capitalism means there’s less poverty than ever. Retrieved from https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2015/01/what-oxfam-doesnt-want-you-to-know-global-capitalism-means-theres-less-poverty-than- ever/

Nettle, D., & Romaine, S. (2000). Vanishing voices. The extinction of the world’s languages. New York: Oxford University Press.

Oxfam. 2016. An economy for the 1%. How privilege and power in the economy drive extreme inequality and how this can be stopped. Oxford: Oxfam.

Pinnock, H. (2009). Language and education: the missing link. London: Save the Children.

Ramachandran, R. (2017). Language use in education and human capital formation: evidence from the Ethiopian educational reform. World Development, 98, 195–213.

Raworth, K. (2012). A safe and just space for humanity. Can we live within the doughnut? Oxfam Policy and Practice: Climate Change and Resilience, 8(1), 1-26.

Raworth, K. (2017). Doughnut economics: Seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist. London: Penguin Random House.

Romaine, S. (2013). Keeping the promise of the Millennium Development Goals: Why language matters. Applied Linguistics Review, 4(1), 1–21.

Romaine, S. (2015). Linguistic diversity and global English: The pushmi-pullyu of language policy and political economy. In T. Ricento (Ed.), Language policy and political economy: English in a global context (pp. 252-275). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

UNESCO. (1953). The use of vernacular languages in education. Paris: UNESCO. UNESCO. (2000). The Dakar framework for action. Paris: UNESCO.

UNESCO. (2003). Education in a multilingual world. Paris: UNESCO.UNESCO. (2010). Education For All Global Monitoring Report 2010. Reaching the marginalized. Paris: UNESCO & Oxford University Press.UNESCO. (2014). EFA Global Monitoring Report – 2013–2014 – Teaching and Learning Achieving quality for all. Paris: UNESCO.UNESCO. (2015a). Education 2030 Incheon Declaration and Framework for

Action. Paris: UNESCO.UNESCO. (2015b). Global Monitoring Report. Education For All 2000-2015:

Achievements and challenges. Paris: UNESCO.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (59)

59SUZANNE ROMAINE

UNESCO. (2016a). Global Education Monitoring Report. Education for people and planet. Creating sustainable futures for all. Paris:UNESCO.UNESCO. (2016b). If you don’t understand, how can you learn? Policy Paper

24. Paris: UNESCO.UNESCO. (2017). Global Education Monitoring Report. Accountability in

education: Meeting our commitments. Paris: UNESCO.UIS [UNESCO Institute for Statistics]. (2017a). Literacy rates continue to rise

from one generation to the next. Fact Sheet No. 45 September 2017 FS/2017/LIT/45.

UIS [UNESCO Institute for Statistics]. (2017b). Reducing global poverty through universal primary and secondary education. Policy Paper 32 /Fact Sheet 44. June 2017.

UIS [UNESCO Institute for Statistics]. (2017c). More than one-half of children and adolescents are not learning worldwide. Fact Sheet No. 46. September 2017. UIS/FS/2017/ED/46.

UIS [UNESCO Institute for Statistics]. (2018). One in five children, adolescents and youth is out of school. Fact Sheet No. 48. February 2018. UIS/FS/2018/ED/48.

UNESCO/UNICEF. (2015). Fixing the broken promise of Education for All.Montreal: UNESCO.

United Nations. (2015). Millennium Development Goals Report 2015. New York: United Nations.

United Nations. (2017). World Population Prospects. The 2017 Revision. New York: United Nations.

UNDP [United Nations Development Program]. (2004). Human Development Report 2014: Cultural liberty in today’s diverse world. New York:

United Nations Development Program.UNDP [United Nations Development Programme]. (2015). United Nations

Human Development Report 2015. Work for human development. New York: United Nations Development Program.

Walter, S.L. (2008). The language of instruction issue: framing an empirical perspective. In B.

Spolsky & F.M. Hult (Eds.), The handbook of educational linguistics (pp. 129–46). Oxford: Blackwell.

Walter, S.L., & Benson, C. (2012). Language policy and medium of instruction in formal education. In B. Spolsky (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of language policy (pp. 278-300). Cambridge: Cambridge University

Press.Wheeler, D. (1980). Human resources development and economic growth

in developing countries: A simultaneous model. World Bank Staff Working Papers no 407. Washington, DC: World Bank.

WCED [World Commission on Environment and Development]. (1987). Our common future. New York: Oxford University Press.

Wikipedia. (2018). List of Wikipedias. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ Wikipedias

Wittgenstein, L. (1961). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. (D.F. Pears & B.F. McGuinness, Trans.). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. (Original work published 1921).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (60)

60 LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND MULTILINGUALISM...

Wolff, J., & de-Shalit, A. (2007). Disadvantage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Woodward, D. (2015). Incrementum ad absurdum: Global growth, inequality and poverty eradication in a carbon-constrained world. World Economic

Review, 4, 43-62.World Bank. (2011). Learning for all: investing in people’s knowledge and

skills to promote development - World Bank Group education strategy 2020. Washington, DC: World Bank.World Bank. (2018). Learning to realize education’s promise. Washington,

DC: International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/ The World Bank.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (61)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (62)

THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Christopher Moseley and Kristen Tcherneshoff

Summary: This paper reports on the recent development of UNESCOs global survey for language data collection. In previous versions of the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger, focus was given to the world’s threatened languages, mapping them based on UNESCOs own vitality scale. An update of the Atlas is currently in action, wherein all languages will be mapped, exclusive of their livelihood status. To adequately update the Atlas, a questionnaire has been developed and distributed to a worldwide consultative body composed of specialist language experts, from academic institutions and speaker communities. However, even with such coverage, UNESCO cannot guarantee to have reached all of the world’s language communities or represented the state of their languages accurately. To ensure that communities are adequately represented within the new version of the Atlas, UNESCO is enlisting the collaboration of independent bodies collecting data on less widely used languages. An example of these collaborations is provided, detailing the work of the non-profit organization Wikitongues. Wikitongues is an open-sourced platform, striving to build the world’s first public archive of every language. They work directly with language communities and activists, providing unparalleled connections between UNESCO and grassroots networks. This paper provides insight into the development of the new Atlas and new collaborations being established with UNESCO.

Keywords: UNESCO, linguistic diversity, sustainable development, Wikitongues, data collection.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (63)

63CHRISTOPHER MOSELEY AND KRISTEN TCHERNESHOFF

EL ATLAS UNESCO DE LAS LENGUAS DEL MUNDO Y SU RESPUESTA AL DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

Resumen: Este capítulo informa acerca del desarrollo de la encuesta general para la recopilación de datos lingüísticos llevada a cabo recientemente por la UNESCO. En la versión anterior del Atlas UNESCO de las Lenguas del Mundo en Peligro, el foco eran las lenguas amenazadas del Mundo, cartografiadas en base a la escala de vitalidad de la propia UNESCO. Una actualización del Atlas está en marcha en este momento, en donde se cartografiarán todas las lenguas, exclusivamente en base a su estatus. Para actualizar adecuadamente el Atlas, se ha desarrollado y distribuido un cuestionario a través de un órgano consultivo mundial integrado por expertos especialistas en lenguaje, de instituciones académicas y de comunidades de hablantes. No obstante, a pesar de esta cobertura, la UNESCO no puede garantizar el haber llegado a todas las comunidades lingüísticas ni representar el estado de sus lenguas de manera exacta. Para asegurar que las comunidades estén representadas adecuadamente en la nueva versión del Atlas, la UNESCO está reclutando la colaboración de organismos independientes para recopilar datos de lenguas menos usadas. Presentamos un ejemplo de estas colaboraciones, que informa acerca del trabajo de Wikitongues, una organización no gubernamental. Wikitongues es una plataforma abierta que se esfuerza en construir el primer archivo público de todas y cada una de las lenguas. Trabajan directamente con las comunidades y activistas de las lenguas y proporcionan conexiones sin parangón entre la UNESCO y las redes comunitarias. En este capítulo se ofrece un avance del desarrollo del nuevo Atlas y de las nuevas colaboraciones que se están estableciendo con la UNESCO.

Palabras clave: UNESCO, diversidad lingüística, desarrollo sostenible, Wikitongues, recopilación de datos.

Introduction

For the editor-in-chief of the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger (Moseley, 2009), the editorial focus was on recording the presence of as many of the world’s threatened languages as possible, by the measure of UNESCO’s own vitality scale. Robust and healthy languages were excluded from it, and thus endangered languages were catalogues, mapped schematically and portrayed in isolation, away from the context of the world’s linguistic power dynamics. Now, as a general World Atlas of Languages is in preparation, the focus has changed to providing that context. Inevitably the question of sustainability arises, and the editorial team is carefully considering the question of the ability of language to survive in all or most of the domains of a healthy natural language.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (64)

64 THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE...

It is perhaps best to clarify at the outset how the concept of ‘linguistic diversity’ relates to that of ‘sustainable development’. In the context of economic life and the maintenance of the natural world, sustainability implies the use of renewable rather than expendable resources. In multilingual countries, does this imply that the shrinking of the number of languages is somehow correlated to over-exploitation of natural resources? Research on this connection is still at a relatively early stage, but the work of such scholars as Romaine and Gorenflo (Gorenflo & Romaine, 2014) has indicated that there is a subtle correlation between use and availability of natural resources, land use, and language diversity. To give a crude example: one might expect to find a great deal of dialect and language diversity in mountainous regions where communities are cut off from one another, such as the Himalayas, but if new communication lines between them are opened, either physical or virtual, greater hom*ogeneity can be expected. The same would apply to other natural barriers such as river systems and dense jungle or forest.

Survey of World Languages Questionnaire

To this purpose, a questionnaire has been prepared, incorporating the UN Agenda’s Sustainable Development Goals among the factors to be considered in gathering data about each language to be included. Among the questions are ones relating to the occupation and livelihood of the speakers, their educational backgrounds, their vernacular literacy, and the socio-economic scope of the language – in other words, factors which directly impinge on the status and strength of a language within the economic life of a nation. On the basis of the responses, for example, it should be possible to ascertain a picture of that proportion of a population that has abandoned its traditional language associated with a particular livelihood and switched to a more widespread regional, national, or international one.

There have been three print editions of the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger: in 1996, 2001, and most recently 2008, which was complemented with an online version. It has grown from a sample of some of the world’s languages under threat in some parts of the world, to the planned comprehensive account of the world’s languages in general and their features, including those relating to sustainable development. A complex range of features helps to sustain languages in spite of encroaching major languages, and at least some of these are going to be shown in the new version of the World Atlas.

Data on endangered languages is going to be migrated onto the new online platform. One important aspect of the work of assessing endangerment was the creation of the UNESCO Vitality Index, and this can continue to be used in the new general language Atlas. Since up to 40% of the world’s languages might not survive to the end of this present century, by some estimates, it is important for UNESCO to play a part in their preservation, in other words to create a sustainable environment for them as much as possible. The Atlas has up to now done a lot to publicize the plight of languages under

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (65)

65CHRISTOPHER MOSELEY AND KRISTEN TCHERNESHOFF

threat. Now it is time for the next step: to put that plight in the context of the environments and life-ways of the communities that use these languages. That is why sampling languages on the ground is so important. UNESCO needs collaboration in order to make this possible.

Sampling Data Factors

Our first experience of sampling data from the grassroots, so to speak, was the opportunity we provided for users of the online endangered language Atlas to submit corrections and suggestions. Over the past seven to eight years the response from users has been very beneficial: it’s led to a lot of improvements to the data in the Atlas. Now it’s time to harvest information from both users and experts. So let us take the opportunity to briefly outline the questionnaire which has been devised by a team of experts and compiled by the linguist Dieter Halwachs for distribution to the world’s linguists and language communities. There are, it might also be noted, separate questionnaires for spoken and signed languages, since Sign languages will also be mapped in the upheaval of the Atlas.

Basic information comes first: name(s), location, and size of community. Following this information, we then plot the affiliation of the language within language families, a factor UNESCO has not analyzed in previous editions. Next comes the language’s status: National, Official, Regional, Community, Minority. Then follows an important section on the encoding and documentation of the language, a critical aspect of its vitality. How much material in the language has been gathered; are there grammars and dictionaries; are there descriptions; is the language written? Each of these factors is graded on a scale to provide an accurate picture. We also have to ask how far each language is standardized.

Following information solicited on the languages themselves, we request facts about the language users: what territories they occupy, size of the community, proportion of users, age distribution, educational attainment, that is, indicators of whether the language is passed on between generations. We additionally classify the users by occupation and by language competence. We go on to investigate literacy and digital usage too. We continue by investigating the socioeconomic aspects – how sustainable is a language in its national or regional economy? The geographic and the economic dimension are interrelated in the questionnaire, as well as the domains of use.

In this regard we look at the use of the language in administration and education - two aspects of language planning and implementation that shed light onto the linguistic situation of a language. As Wolff (Wolff, 2010) points out, there are a variety of extra-linguistic complexities involved in comprehensive language planning within administrative and educational settings. There is a) the political dimension: language can be a symbol of power and simultaneously, a symbol of the powerless (i.e. in former colonial countries language can be constructed to show an exertion of power among

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (66)

66 THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE...

the former colonial powers, the elite, and/or the majority); b) the social dimension: language is a symbol of social identity and has the capability to marginalize and stigmatize; c) the economic dimension: language can pave the way from a largely uncontrolled informal sector into a regulated formal sector and can lead to economic growth through a more inclusive education system; and d) the cultural dimension: language is intellectual, creating richness and resourcefulness.

More enduring for the language under discussion steers around this final point, what we call its ‘ethnoculture’: its use in customary and ritual practices, traditional medicine, craftsmanship, and law. From there it’s a natural progression to look at use of the language in commercial culture, the media, and the press, broadcasting, digital media, and the legal system.

At the end of the questionnaire is an appendix about that eternal question: what constitutes a language as opposed to a dialect, or a superlanguage. And there is a little section called: what is understood by linguistic diversity? Let us quote the last paragraph of it: “In the context of the World Atlas of Languages linguistic diversity has to be understood as the current distribution of living languages with the addition of the languages no longer in use that are documented in the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger.”

In the questionnaire, a detailed explanation of the grading system is given before the linguist fills in the actual answers. The grading system and the options within an answer are made as detailed as possible; we tried to think of every unambiguous eventuality. Now that of course will mean that a lot of the answers will be left blank: either the details don’t apply, or the facts simply aren’t known. One thing this questionnaire will do is to reveal the state of the world’s knowledge about its languages.

Those who compile the data on each language will be a worldwide consultative body composed of specialist language experts, from academic institutions and speaker communities. However, even with such coverage, UNESCO cannot guarantee to have reached all of the world’s language communities or represented the state of their languages accurately.

Current State of Data Collection

In our current world, data collection on languages and language documentation has become a race against history: the myriad of languages signed and spoken around our world continue to disappear at, what feels like, an implacable rate, leaving languages and cultures to wither away. At the blunt end of economic and political exclusion, the world’s most diverse regions are subject to forced assimilation at historically unprecedented rates. And as mentioned at the onset of this paper, when shifting focus to the sustainable development and ethnobotanical vantage point, the world’s most diverse regions are being threatened by climate change.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (67)

67CHRISTOPHER MOSELEY AND KRISTEN TCHERNESHOFF

Apologists for this reality often argue that culture is dynamic, and that languages have always gone extinct to make room for new ones. After all, there would be no French without the death of Latin, and no English had Old Saxon not faded away. While this is without a doubt, the twenty-first century’s rate of language loss is unprecedented. Today, with only 8% of the world’s languages recognized in an institutional capacity1, communities impacted by language loss receive little to no support from the public or private sectors. And as the side effects of climate change, economic globalization, and humanitarian crises provoke a rise in forced migration, more and more communities are poised to experience language loss.

Sustaining language is central to building a more inclusive world; building universal access to language preservation would elevate humanity. It would fortify the collective knowledge that benefits us all, whether our mother tongue is English, Mandarin, or Daakaka. In fact, entire fields in science and the humanities are dedicated to unraveling wisdom from the 7,000 ways we speak.

Consider the Pacific nation of Vanuatu, one of the world’s most “linguistically-dense” countries. Located in Eastern Melanesia, the archipelago nation is home to rich biodiversity, which is encoded in the vocabulary of its many hundreds of languages. That is, local communities have words for different species of plant and animal life that have yet to be classified by researchers. This reality led the Bronx Botanical Gardens to partner with communities in Vanuatu—an instance of linguistic diversity fueling the scientific method. Paleolinguists uncover evidence of tectonic events from prehistory, such as the Bering Strait and Bantu migrations, by tracing linguistic change across vast geographies.

Collaboration with Independent Bodies

To better reach these communities, UNESCO is planning to enlist the collaboration of independent bodies collecting data on less widely used languages—organizations and activists who have established grassroots networks and have shown flexibility in their approach to language documentation and data collection. One of these organizations, Wikitongues, was established fairly recently, yet has already created a large network of volunteers and contributors from around the world.

What is Wikitongues?

Wikitongues is a non-profit organization working to build the world’s first public archive of every language in the world. Wikitongues is a completely

1 https://www.ethnologue.com

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (68)

68 THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE...

open-sourced organization, meaning that their work is available to all, for pedagogical, research, and learning purposes, under Creative Commons licensing.

The non-profit organization was founded in Brooklyn, New York, USA, in 2014 by former students of Parsons School of Design in New York City - Daniel Bögre-Udell and Frederico Andrade. Bögre-Udell, Andrade, and Tcherneshoff, the latter who oversees the Wikitongues community and partnership programs, are the core members who work daily on the Wikitongues vision. Being an entirely volunteer driven platform, Wikitongues leadership nourishes a decentralized approach. In this way, they are able to operate with flexibility, working with more than a thousand contributors based in over 90 countries.

Volunteer opportunities are not limited to linguists though many who join are students of other degrees; engineers; software developers; writers; teachers; retirees. Wikitongues believes that the most conclusive approach to language and cultural preservation is through interdisciplinary relations: by working alongside everyone from intergovernmental organizations to grassroots activists to language learners, it is ensured that everyone is able to participate in this venture.

Wikitongues believes in leveraging technology and the internet to assist with language preservation. Many have viewed technology as a change destructive of endangered languages - they argue that this calamity can be seen on a daily basis, as only certain languages are available on operating devices and in traditional media spaces (although both are regularly expanding). Change, and by extension, technology, is not a threat to culture: communities throughout time have constantly been engaged with changes and new possibilities. A British farmer did not cease to be British when he put away the horse and buggy in favor of the automobile. Change is the one constant in human history and we will continue to adapt - technology, when viewed in an optimistic light, should be seen as a force for good.

Young language activists are creating new generations of language learners through mobile apps, in the form of games and dictionaries. Social media has provided the opportunity for language meetups, as seen with the revitalization of Cornish, which in large part owes itself to the Cornish diaspora connecting via Facebook groups. By keeping languages woven into the fabric of daily life, we are able to ensure that younger users will maintain them in the generations to come.

Due to their presence on social media and their utilization of the internet as a force for hope, Wikitongues has established an ability to bridge gaps between international top level organizations, and language users within their communities; an aspect UNESCO is working to incorporate throughout the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages. Kunto, a Wikitongues volunteer who is based in Indonesia, recently documented 15 different languages during a recording session, many now under analysis by linguists, as they are questioning whether these languages had ever been documented.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (69)

69CHRISTOPHER MOSELEY AND KRISTEN TCHERNESHOFF

For some Wikitongues language consultants, they have never had their language represented on the global stage. Language consultant Albina, who worked with Kunto in Borneo, was able to share her mother tongue, Bedinah, for the first time with the international community through Wikitongues extensive network and following. Hangi in the Democratic Republic of Congo is passionately working on building the first dictionary for Kihunde, his mother tongue, and recently started a new project translating prominent poetry passages from English into Kihunde.

Wikitongues is Hangi and Kunto and Albina; Wikitongues is every other volunteer around the world working to be an ally to linguistic diversity.

What Does Wikitongues Do?

Wikitongues volunteers are working to pave the way for the futures of their languages, ensuring their digital representation and engaging with activists from other cultures. Their organization works along a variety of linguistic documentation methods, taking shape in the form of oral histories, word lists, and dictionaries. They further promote the active use of these languages - establishing educational chapters, creating grammar books, and working alongside activists from language communities. A main challenge for minoritized language groups has been access to frameworks for producing their own linguistic documentation, educational materials (which often take the shape of mobile apps these days), and structured advocacy. To assist with this, Wikitongues is developing resources so that all people will have the tools and steps available to them to sustain their languages, through documentation, education, and activism for cultural inclusion.

Oral histories produced by Wikitongues are archived and hosted in a variety of spaces, for all to see, research, and learn from. The Library of Congress in Washington D.C. is a recent partner, and now Wikitongues recordings will be accessible to all through the library’s public domain. Wikitongues has also partnered with localized non-profit organizations around the world and are consociating with different Peace Corps branches, in order to strengthen their outreach. Oral histories can be found on their YouTube channel2 and submission is possible through their website3.

Different communities and languages have unique needs and therefore, unique approaches to cultural and linguistic preservation. This demands an organic and connective approach, where there is no predetermined path, but rather, a customized approach for each community. By UNESCO partnering with ‘middle men’, such as Wikitongues, who are closely connected to activists

2 https://www.youtube.com/wikitongues 3 https://wikitongues.org/submit-a-video/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (70)

70 THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE...

on the ground, these relationships can be built upon genuine foundations and positions of trust.

Grassroots activists, language speakers, academics, and policy makers, language speakers have been comfortable in approaching Wikitongues to discuss their language and culture. Placed within these connections, UNESCO has the opportunity to support activism from the bottom up and acutely perceive needs directly from the individuals who comprise local communities. Wikitongues global network can amplify UNESCO’s message, while also building momentum around the Atlas--all coinciding with the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages.

What might blossom from a direct connection between the woman who composed the first dictionary in Gottscheerish, and the man who wrote the first novel in Bildts? How might they inspire others who have just begun to save their languages? These bridges are the basis of cultural sustainability. A century from now, 7,000 languages could cultivate a better world, spirited and robust.

The Atlas and The Community

The implementation of external organizations and the transition from the UNESCO Atlas of Languages in Danger to the World Atlas of Languages will not mean, however, that the content of the endangered language Atlas from before will be abandoned. On the contrary, the online contributions from users have, over the years of existence of the online version, greatly enhanced the value, accuracy, and timeliness of the Atlas. It has proven the value of the grassroots and volunteer contributors mentioned above. The future Atlas now in formation will also rely, through the responses to the questionnaire, on the contribution of language users as well as scholars. UNESCO’s member states alone, at the national and institutional level, cannot be expected to provide a full picture of actual language use.

Provision of field recordings of the world’s minority languages in the Atlas is a way to compensate for the lack of first-hand source materials in and about many of them. Can all this extra data really contribute to sustaining languages that are in danger of disappearing? We who work on this Atlas project believe that it can. The online Atlas can be distributed as an educational tool to schools and to community groups, so that not just research scholars, but schoolchildren and university students, and indeed anyone, can come to appreciate the uniqueness of their own language and speech community in the context of the world’s linguistic heritage.

The reasons for the fluctuating fortunes of languages are of course complex and varied. Even natural disasters can occasionally wipe out the last communities of speakers. Referring back to Vanuatu once again, in 2005, the UN declared the archipelago to have the world’s first climate change refugees—

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (71)

71CHRISTOPHER MOSELEY AND KRISTEN TCHERNESHOFF

and the nation’s islands continue to face rising sea levels, earthquakes, ocean acidification, among other pressures of climate change. The majority of Vanuatu’s 81 actively used indigenous languages are spoken or signed by less than 5,000 speakers, most in the hundreds. With communities being relocated and forced to merge, these languages will continue to disappear, taking generations of knowledge with them. In adamantine perseverance, the Vanuatu Culture Center has recently partnered with Wikitongues and Peace Corps Vanuatu volunteers to work with local language communities and to create an archival space for oral histories of Vanuatu’s indigenous languages.

Very often in the past, the expansion of colonial settlements has meant the attrition of languages through the forcible appropriation of their land. To take some examples from Latin America, the present-day speech community of the Toba Maskoy in Paraguay is thought to be descended from a group of Argentinian chiefs of the Toba people who settled in Alto Paraguay department after fleeing persecution in their traditional homeland. Today the speech community comprises 1,287 speakers out of an ethnic community of 1,842 (2012 census). Speakers of Torá, a Chapacuran language of Amazonas state in Brazil, were descendants of the survivors of a punitive expedition in the 18th century; their language is now thought to be completely extinct.

When language endangerment appears in the news nowadays, it is usually a case of a language in extremis. A graphic example of the delicate balance between sustainability and endangerment recently emerged when the last member of an uncontacted tribe in Brazil came to light, presumably the last speaker of his language, as he was a solitary man known to be the last survivor of a massacre of his tribe in 1995. Yet this is only the visible extreme of a worldwide picture of decimation, in fact only semi-visible, as the hermit in this case is protected from intrusion by law on his reservation.

Contrast the situation for indigenous languages in Australia, with only a little more than a dozen viable languages left out of at least 250 known to have existed, with that of its neighbour Papua New Guinea, with over eight hundred distinct languages, making it the most linguistically diverse nation on earth. What caused this great difference? Not only the historical circ*mstances of colonization, of course, though they were significantly different, but also the terrain of the two countries. Australia consists of largely flat desert, with unimpeded access, apart from a hostile climate in the interior, suitable for grazing, mining, forestry and other forms of exploitation of the earth’s resources by large, organized agglomerations of settlers who do not need to see or contact those resources directly to exploit them. Papua New Guinea is rugged, mountainous, much more densely populated by discrete groups who outnumber the incomers; exploitation of its resources takes place on a different scale.

Civilizations that had existed for forty thousand years in Australia were suddenly disrupted in the last two hundred; the resulting discontinuity has manifested itself in the rapid shrinking of language use and complete language loss in most cases. Attachment to the ancestral land is particularly

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (72)

72 THE UNESCO WORLD ATLAS OF LANGUAGES AND ITS RESPONSE...

strong among Australian Aboriginal peoples, and so the intimate relationship between linguistic diversity and ecological sustainability is thrown into particularly sharp relief here.

And even if attachment to ancestral land does not manifest itself in the same way among indigenous peoples all over the world, is this not a good starting point for a reformed attitude of respect to traditional ownership? In Australia it has become more and more commonplace for public meetings where indigenous people are present to begin the proceedings by acknowledging the traditional owners of the land on which one stands.

The question of land custodianship, authority, and control over traditional land, or in the case of North America, reservations assigned to indigenous people by the government – in some cases far from the traditional homeland – is also bound up with both sustainability and language maintenance. Reservations can and do set up schools to maintain languages that might otherwise have become extinct generations ago. Sustainability may or not be a priority on a reservation, but some degree of economic self-sufficiency often is; and as for the viability of the indigenous languages spoken within these communities, the domains of language use are quite restricted to the reservation themselves, and pressure from the majority language is great. The result may be a language of restricted use among tribal elders, and merely emblematic of tribal identity.

In mapping the world’s languages, then, UNESCO, with the help of its sister organizations in the field and on the ground, aims to present as truthful and finely-grained a picture of the viability of the world’s languages as possible at this point in history.

References

Gorenflo, L.J., Romaine, S., Musinsky, S., Denik, M. and Mittermeier, R.A. (2014). Linguistic Diversity in High Biodiversity Regions. Conservation International.

Moseley, C (ed.). (2007). Encyclopedia of the World’s Endangered Languages, 1st ed. Routledge.

Thomas, A. (2018). On a Mission to Save Languages From Extinction. Retrieved from https://www.theepochtimes.com/on-a-mission-to-save-languages-from-extinction_2698484.html.

Wolff, H.E. (2010). Multilingualism and Language Policies in Anglophone and Francophone Africa from a Sociolinguistic Macro-Perspective, with

Reference to Language-in-Education Issues. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (73)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (74)

PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA: ASSET FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT?

H. Ekkehard Wolff

Summary: The chapter identifies linguistic plurality and diversity as a natural feature of human societies. It takes issue with the notion of ‘minority language’, given that 96% of languages are spoken by less than one million people, and about half by fewer than 50,000. This tends to link ‘majority’ languages to exceptional historical processes of imperialist/colonialist expansion.

In Africa, a situation of extreme territorial multilingualism is aggravated by polyglossia (extended diglossia), because the former colonial masters imposed their own languages for official communication and formal education, thereby politically minoritizing the African languages. Post-independence political elites in Africa simply copied models of ‘nation building’ rooted in Eurocentric 19th century national-romantic ideology, which postulates largely hom*ogenous societies and necessitates monolingual options for official language policies.

Successful mass education is a prerequisite of sustainable development. In postcolonial Africa, operating formal education through foreign languages, which are poorly mastered by learners and teachers, is inefficient and ineffective. It amounts to a waste of human and considerable financial resources. The alternative option is mother tongue-based multilingual education, which would involve African (minority, lingua franca) and non-African languages and be practiced throughout all cycles of formal education, including higher education at university level. In a parallel fashion, hithertodis-empowered indigenous languages would undergo automatic intellectualization and re-empowerment.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (75)

75H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

In order to achieve sustainable development, Africa must free herself from ‘neo-colonial’ dependence on knowledge imported from elsewhere wrapped in foreign languages, but follow the successful global model of operating education through both local and global languages.

Keywords: Development, education, ideology, intellectualization, multilingualism, polyglossia, re-empowerment, postcolonial class divide.

PLURALIDAD Y DIVERSIDAD DE LAS LENGUAS DE AFRICA: RECURSO PARA EL DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

Resumen: Este capítulo identifica la pluralidad lingüística y la diversidad como un rasgo natural de las sociedades humanas. Tiene que ver con la cuestión de “lengua minorizada”, dado que el 96% de las lenguas son habladas por menos de un millon de personas, y la mitad aproximadamente por menos de 50.000. Esto nos lleva a asociar a las lenguas “mayoritarias” con un proceso histórico excepcional de expansión imperialista/colonialista.

En África, la situación de multilingüismo territorial extremo está agravada por la poliglosia (diglosia extendida), porque los exdirigentes coloniales impusieron sus propias lenguas para la comunicación official, minorizando políticamente, por consiguiente, las lenguas africanas. Las élites políticas postcoloniales de África simplemente copiaron los modelos de “construcción nacional” basándose en la ideología del nacionalismo-romántico eurocéntrico del siglo XIX, que assume las sociedades en gran medida como hom*ogéneas y que necesitan opciones monolingües para las políticas lingüísticas oficiales.

La educación de masas exitosa es un prerrequisito para el desarrollo sostenible. La educación formal del África postcolonial, que funciona a través de lenguas extranjeras que tanto alumnos como docentes dominan pobremente, resulta ineficaz e ineficiente. Supone una gran cantidad de recursos humanos y considerables recursos financieros. La opción alternativa es la educación multilingüe basada en la lengua materna, que incluya lenguas africanas (minoritaria, lengua franca) y no africanas, y que debería practicarse a lo largo de todos los ciclos de la educación reglada, incluida la educación superior a nivel universitario. De manera paralela, las lenguas indígenas hasta ahora desempoderadas podrían experimentar automáticamente su intelectualización y empoderamiento.

A fin de lograr un desarrollo sostenible, África tiene que liberarse de la dependencia “neo-colonial” del conocimiento que se importa desde fuera envuelto en lenguas extranjeras, y seguir un modelo global capaz para educar tanto en la/s lengua/s local/es como en las globales.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (76)

76 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

Palabras clave: Desarrollo, educación, ideología, intelectualización, multilingüismo, poliglosia, reempoderamiento.

1. Introduction

1.1. Language matters in Africa: addressing territorial, individual, sociocultural and institutional multilingualism

Language is the primary means of expression in human communication. Diversification in human evolution among members of genus hom*o in Africa was accompanied by a diversifying evolution of human language. Currently, about 7,000 languages are spoken on our planet by members of the surviving sub-species hom*o sapiens sapiens, well over 2,000 of these languages are found on the African continent.

In contexts of extreme territorial multilingualism, numbers of speakers of any language may be rather small (cf. section 2.4), so that large territories may be populated exclusively by what could be referred to as ‘linguistic minorities’ (cf. section 2.1). Consequently, having a choice among several languages is of importance to individuals who wish to communicate beyond the limits of their immediate linguistic environment, which is characterized by their ‘mother-tongue’ (aka ‘first’ or ‘home’) language. In African intellectual circles, the limitations of one’s African mother-tongue language are often perceived as a ‘linguistic jail’ (Adama Ouane), while practices of individual multilingualism open a ‘window to the world’, which is provided by the ‘global’ (mostly ex-colonial) languages of European provenance, less so by even the largest African lingua francas. Therefore, languages ‘foreign’ to Africa sit high on the polyglossia scale (cf. section 1.5), which is characteristic for colonial and post-colonial African societies.

Territorial multilingualism creates language barriers for horizontal (geographic) mobility, polyglossia creates language barriers for vertical (social and economic) upward mobility. Both types of language barriers are best overcome by individual multilingualism. In some minority communities of practice in Africa, this has become a common feature to the extent that there are practically no more monolingual speakers. We then speak of more or less stable sociocultural multilingualism, mostly involving neighbouring local languages and African lingua francas of regional and/or country-wide, if not cross-border distribution. Hence, institutionalizing multilingualism is an a priori feasible option for multilingualism management and language planning in post-colonial African polities. Institutional multilingualism would target more effective country-wide communication, which would also benefit the amelioration of mass education and thereby pave the way towards mental decolonization and sustainable development.

Language also serves as ideology-laden symbol, it is a core element in debates concerning socio-psychological and cultural identity and mental decolonization (cf. Ngu gi wa Thiong’o, 1986). Language as an instrument is

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (77)

77H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

further responsible for failure or success in both education and development intervention on the grassroots level (cf. Ouane & Glanz, 2010; Wolff, 2016). Still, mainstream development discourse turns a blind eye on language (Wolff, 2016). Based on information deficits regarding sociolinguistic realities in Africa and due to ideological blinkers, governments and development experts in the North and the South are guilty of underestimating, if not ignoring, the relevance of the language factor for achieving sustainable development in Africa (cf. Wolff, 2017).

Africa hosts more than 2,000 mother tongue languages and thriving African lingua francas, whose importance for ‘development’ tends to be completely ignored.1 Instead, the role of European languages for communication and development in Africa is grossly overrated. It remains widely overlooked that – outside elitist and urban minorities – Africans use almost exclusively African languages. Nonetheless and supported by the entrenched polyglossia situation, Africans tend to believe that command of a European language is necessary for attaining higher standards of living and achieving upward social mobility; as a rule, this is the language of the former colonial master. On the other hand, many Africans deplore the negative effect of such attitude on notions of African authenticity and identity that are linked to the symbolic value connected to the continued use of indigenous African languages. This situation amounts to a ‘bedevilling dilemma’ (Adegbija, 2000) of language policy planning in Africa, namely whether to opt for either endoglossic or exoglossic solutions. The obvious solution, however and the one advocated in this chapter and elsewhere, is mother tongue-based multilingualism involving both African and non-African languages.

1.2. Eurocentric ideology versus African reality

Fundamental to modern political philosophy in the North is the idea of nation state, among whose outstanding features counts linguistic hom*ogeneity: one state – one nation – one language, which links up with 19th century European experience. In the South, members of the postcolonial elite, who have taken over the colonial state to the extent of ‘state capture’, keep alive such Eurocentric concepts that were imposed by the former colonial masters. They, too, believe in the chimera of hom*ogenous nation states in blatant contradiction to Africa’s essential and persistent linguistic plurality and diversity. However, this contradiction allows Southern oligarchic minorities to

1 The term ‘development’ is here used in the sense of its common occurrence in public discourse, namely as part of an ideology-laden dichotomy between so-called ‘developed’ societies and/or economies in the ‘North’ and so-called ‘underdeveloped’ (or: ‘developing’) societies and/or economies in the Global South. More specifically, the term relates to ‘goals and activities of North-South cooperation and aid projects targeting the amelioration of basic living conditions in underdeveloped parts of the world based on models reflecting the home situation of the donors’ (Wolff 2016: 321).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (78)

78 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

enjoy exclusive privileges, which are based on superior education linked to a foreign language (e.g., English, French, Portuguese), which has become enshrined in the Constitution as the country’s official language. This happens to the detriment of the so-called masses who are left behind: they remain under-educated due to poor-quality access to the (ex-colonial) language of power which serves as the only medium of instruction, either from beginning (as in former French and Portuguese territories) or after lower primary education (as in former British territories).

Eurocentric nation-state ideology, however, does not match African sociolinguistic reality. The idea of more or less hom*ogenous nations sharing same or adjacent substantial territories and a same language (and assumingly also same culture or civilization) does hardly apply to Africa. The continent’s current situation of ‘ethnolinguistic’ plurality dates back to pre-colonial history.2 So-called ethnolinguistic communities of practice with rather low numbers of (mother-tongue) speakers of particular language varieties, i.e. below 50,000 or even 10,000 speakers, tend to be the rule, languages with more than 100,000 (mother-tongue) speakers are much less frequent. Numbers of speakers may reach one million and more when a language functions as regional lingua franca and is acquired by considerable numbers of non-native speakers (section 2.4). This spread of lingua francas in order to overcome language barriers, however, has little to do with the enforced imposition of a ‘language of power’ as means of imperialist expansion and/or colonization that we know from European history and which has been imposed on colonial territories in Africa.

In Africa, temporary hegemonic dominance of certain polities referred to as ‘Kingdoms’ and ‘Empires’ in historiographic literature would appear not to have had the effect of enforced linguistic and cultural assimilation and hom*ogenization as it did under regimes of European imperialism. The African solution, as it would appear, was and is individual and socio-culturally entrenched more or less stable multilingualism. In Africa and again unlike in Europe, ‘language’ (in terms of reified artefactual construct) would appear not be linked by ideology as being essential to individual or collective identity. This is witnessed by the frequent occurrence of ‘language shift’ and the rather ‘fluid’ linguistic practices of ‘trans-‘ or ‘polylanguaging’, which more recent sociolinguistic research has described as characteristic for mostly (but not exclusively) urban communication and among the younger generation in

2 The widely used term ‘ethnolinguistic group’ serves as apparently politically more correct replacement of the contaminated term ‘tribe’. It suggests, however, a close if not essential link between ‘ethnicity’ and ‘language’ which is by no means supported by sociolinguistic observations in Africa, but again reflects Eurocentric preconceptions. The most neutral term, therefore, and supported by most recent insights into patterns of language use particularly in urban African and among youth, would be ‘communities of shared linguistic practice’, including instantiations of so-called ‘trans-’ or ‘polylanguaging’ (cf. below).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (79)

79H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

Africa. Accordingly, current sociolinguistic research in Africa focuses precisely on the motivations for choice and even definition of, ‘language’ in the context of multilingual practices (cf. Hollington & Nassenstein, 2019; Lüpke, 2019).

1.3.Language-relatedinformationdeficitsperpetuateAfrican‘underdevelopment’

Overcoming ‘underdevelopment’ in Africa is a slow process. Part of the problem lies in a conspiracy of ignorance involving members of the donor community from the North as much as their Southern counterparts. They share common attitudes, values and ideologies due to formal education through educational institutions which perpetuate Eurocentric perspectives since colonial times. These Eurocentric attitudes make them blind to potential immaterial assets for speeding up ‘development’, in particular by improving nation-wide communication and mass education through adequate language policies. Due to the perpetuation of Eurocentric educational content and channelled through a common language which remains foreign to African learners, representatives of the donor community from the North (including the former colonial masters) and their African counterparts not only suffer from under-information and knowledge deficits regarding African linguistic and cultural heritage, but also share negative attitudes towards them.

Information comes to government officials and the general public mainly through, for instance, journalism, less directly through the channels of African Studies as part of mainstream development sciences, both using, for instance, English or French as means of communication. Mainstream ‘development discourse’ has been monopolized by representatives of the economic and political sciences, who tend to ignore challenges provided by critical humanities including focused research on African languages, and which would include relevant utterances in African languages (see Fig. 1 below). Hence the tongue-in-cheek definition of African Studies as anything that one can read about Africa in English. African voices don’t count in mainstream development discourse, unless they make use of the language of the former colonial master.

Mainstream theoretical development discourse reflects ideological positions stemming from the North. For decades, economists and political scientists have monopolized the debate, who design their models to fit monolingual European-type nation states (see below). They remain ignorant on language matters in what are essentially multilingual societies, disregarding critical input by, for instance, better-informed sociolinguists and educationists. A review of mainstream theoretical literature reveals that ‘language’ never figures, apart from vague reference to ‘ethnolinguistic plurality’ in Africa. In contradiction to research results from Applied African Sociolinguistics, mainstream development theoreticians refuse to accept multilingualism as a potential asset for, but sweep it aside as a priori detrimental to, development (Wolff, 2016).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (80)

80 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

Eurocentric ignorance about the impact of language(s), African and other, on development cements the status quo since it influences current models of political theory that postcolonial governments subscribe to. Rather than pushing an overdue linguistic revolution towards re-empowerment of African languages, which would speed up sustainable development, as enlightened sociolinguists have long argued, development agents from the North and their Southern counterparts perpetuate the status quo of severe linguistic imbalance among languages (polyglossia) and, thereby, cement African underdevelopment.

1.4. Multilingualism in Africa used as asset for sustainable development

As a rule and until this day, new knowledge relevant to ‘development’ comes to Africa from the North wrapped in languages of European provenance. It is a truism that ‘development’ involves transfer of knowledge, and that knowledge transfer presupposes successful communication. The efficiency of human communication hinges on good command of shared languages on each side in order to overcome language barriers. Post-colonial African countries and societies are characterized by ubiquitous language barriers. Therefore, institutional multilingualism becomes a crucial prerequisite for effective country-wide communication and education, for establishing participatory democracy, and consequently for fostering sustainable development. For efficient country-wide communication and quality mass education as well as North-South knowledge transfer to reach local peoples, the use of African languages is imperative. Across Africa, ‘mass’ education (as opposed to ‘elitist’ education) solely based on foreign (mostly ex-colonial) languages has failed; the continent needs multilingual education systems that make use of both African and non-African languages (cf. Ouane & Glanz, 2010). Also, for knowledge transfer to be effective on the grassroots level for and during development intervention, choice of language is decisive. Top-down communication resting on the exclusive use of the language of the former colonial master will be of little if any efficiency with local African communities, whose command of this language may be non-existent or rather limited at most. For foreign knowledge to be successfully transferred, it needs to be assimilated through local languages that are fully mastered by the receiving populations. Using exclusively languages that are foreign to local communities will not do the job (Wolff, 2016).

Fundamental criticism concerning Northern development intervention strategies in Africa fills many pages in learned journals and books. Criticism targeting the neglect of the language factor in development discourse is much less written about (Wolff, 2016). Current research in the emerging field of ‘Applied African Sociolinguistics’ takes issue with the persisting regime of ignorance concerning sociolinguistic realities in Africa, in both the North and the South (cf. Fig. 1 below).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (81)

81H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

1.5. Post-colonial class divide and status quo maintenance syndrome

Post-colonial African societies are characterized by a class-divide largely based on preference of language choice. This class-divide was identified by sociolinguists soon after independence, but until now has not won the political attention it deserves, since politicians are part of the problem. The ‘postcolonial class-divide’ (Pierre Alexandre) separates alienated elite minorities from silent majorities, i.e. the so-called ‘masses’. The elites are alienated from their roots by (post-) colonial education through the ex-colonial language, resulting in negative attitudes towards African languages and cultures, which are viewed as being ‘inferior’ to the languages and civilizations of European provenance. These elites function as copy-cat counterparts in North-South relations. Their prime interest is ‘status quo maintenance’ (Neville Alexander) ensuring ‘elite closure’ (Carol Myers-Scotton). This guarantees their privileges regarding access to power and national resources and controls recruitment to their ranks, all via superior formal education in exclusive (often private and inhibiting expensive) institutions operating through, and facilitating effective acquisition of, the official (ex-colonial) language. As a social group, they are defined by this voluntary choice of exoglossic monolingualism, which sets them apart from the masses, who communicate mainly through African languages including practices recently referred to as polylanguaging.

The postcolonial elite minorities are unwilling if not meanwhile unable to use African languages. They oppose the re-empowerment of the African languages that were minoritized and disempowered during colonial rule, fearing subsequent empowerment of the masses which might jeopardize the oligarchy’s privileged status. In this way, the ex-colonial languages block the way towards sustainable development, mainly through the bottle-neck restrictions of access to quality education via these languages. This insight gained from sociolinguistic research in post-colonial Africa contradicts the widely-held intuitive assumptions by many African and non-African intellectuals, including academics and politicians, according to which only the purportedly ‘superior’ languages of European provenance allow quality education in order to overcome ‘underdevelopment’ in Africa, which is -counterfactually- seen as being linked to a purported ‘inferiority’ of African languages.

1.6.ForeignownershipofAfrica’sofficiallanguagescementslinguistic imperialism

In order to overcome the multiple language barriers in Africa, Northern interventionists favour the imposition of ‘neutral’ languages which –as a rule– are their own. In daily practice, Africans don’t believe in neutral languages, instead they use various multilingual practices, which reflect their understanding of language choice as constituting negotiable features of flexible identities.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (82)

82 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

Clearly, ex-colonial languages even if installed by the Constitution as ‘official’ languages, are never neutral in the linguistic balance of power within the polity. They create ‘neo-apartheid’ (Neville Alexander) to the benefit of elite minorities and foreign donors. These languages remain burdened with their affinity to (neo-) colonialism, being perceived as medium and symbol of exogenous power and exploitation.

Official monolingualism in Africa based on European languages, therefore, cements linguistic imperialism and creates persisting obstructive reactions in sections of the African populations.

1.7. Language and mental decolonization of the South

Outside elitist minorities working in government administration and in the formal sector of economy, Africans as a rule prefer to use African languages. Racist prejudice, however, denies these languages the ability to effectively encode anything relevant to modern times, despite the amply documented fact that African languages can serve all needs of communication on all matters of development, including all levels of formal education. For final mental decolonization to take place in Africa and to overcome neo-colonial linguistic imperialism, African languages alongside – not necessarily instead of – global languages have to be officially used and thus become re-empowered for use in all domains.

Not using African languages particularly in so-called higher domains has a double negative effect. Democratic and effective country-wide communication is impaired, because imposing European languages as official languages amounts to imposing additional language barriers for the majority of the population. In a parallel way, also impaired is the natural intellectualization of African languages on their way to becoming fully standardized and elaborated languages on equal footing with European languages, namely as long as they arenot used naturally also in the so-called higher domains (cf. Wolff, 2016).

1.8. Summarizing the linguistic divide in North-South development communication

Fig. 1 attempts to capture restricted information flow based on the recognition of a crucial linguistic divide, namely between information available only through European languages on the one side, and information stored in and made accessible through African languages on the other. In Africa, we are dealing with the notorious postcolonial class-divide between alienated elite minorities and silent majorities, which is primarily based on language choice, i.e., for instance, English (only) vs. use of LOTE (‘languages other than English’). In the North, we are dealing with the informational divide between under-informed / ignorant / indifferent public opinion including governments and better-informed critical humanities, with quality journalism and NGO

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (83)

83H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

9

Fig. 1. The linguistic divide affecting North-South development communication

SOUTH: suffering from language-based NORTH: suffering from language-based

postcolonial class-divide information deficits

Silent majority (85-90%) - almost exclusively using African languages; - with little, often underperforming formal education via ‘foreign’ language; - with little if any impact on public discourse and politics.

Alienated postcolonial elite (10-15% of national population) - almost exclusively relying on a ‘foreign’ (ex-colonial) language, which they have more or less successfully acquired by either privileged formal education, or as ‘educational survivors’ despite having been subjected to underperforming systems of mass education.

Ignorant/under-informed /indifferent public - with no first-hand nor scientifically robust comprehensive information concerning African affairs and development issues; - with limited exposure to rare quality journalism on Africa; - incl. participants in ‘mass tourism’ to Africa (with hardly if any learning effects).

Critical humanities (incl. Applied African Sociolinguistics) - based on systematic empirical (‘field’) research in Africa, - involving successful communication on grassroots level through use of local languages (sociolinguists, educationists, anthropologists, non-mainstream social scientists, etc.); - with little if any impact on mainstream official development discourse & public opinion.

No N North-South development

communication

orth-South development

communication rht communication

South development

communication

Under-informed governments & ‘development’ experts - political consulting largely monopolized by mainstream social & economic sciences & mainstream African Studies; - non-comprehensive information neglecting the ‘language factor’ & indifferent agents with purely economic interests - acceptance of postcolonial status quo as profitable, incl. ‘state capture’ by oligarchic regimes and foreign ownership of the official languages in Africa.

Quality journalism & humanitarian activism (NGOs) - based on non- systematic (‘anecdotal’) experience in Africa; - with little impact on public opinion and mainstream official development discourse. Africa:

Sociolinguistic complexity, with essential effect on ‘(under)development’

Theoretical North-South development

communication

Multilingual communication incl. African languages

Mainstream African Studies

Functional information transfer based on monolingual communication via European language(s)

Restricted information transfer involving limitations of access to African languages due to language barriers (African <> global languages)

Dysfunctional communication due to heavy language barrier effects (African <> global languages)

LANGUAGE BARRIER: Exclusive use of foreign (ex-colonial) language

experience playing a restricted intermediate role, depending on their access to communication also in the African languages.

Fig. 1. The linguistic divide affecting North-South development communication

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (84)

84 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

2. Empirical facts: Linguistic plurality and diversity in Africa

2.1. Linguistic plurality

In Africa, linguistic plurality refers to the number of languages being used on both continental and country level. The languages counted include indigenous (‘endoglossic’) and originally foreign (‘exoglossic’) languages, the latter having arrived by colonization and/or migration into Africa in historical times. In addition, there are languages that have emerged in Africa through processes of pidginization and creolization. They reflect scenarios of language contact, both among African languages and between African and originally non-African languages.

On the continental level, Africa is home to 2,143 languages, which constitutes almost one third of all 7,097 living languages on our planet (Simons et al. 2018). On country level, numbers of languages vary between below 10 and above 500. Linguistic plurality is much higher in sub-Saharan Africa. This is due to an assimilation and hom*ogenization effect (‘Arabicization’) in the Islamic parts of northern and north-eastern Africa following the spread of Islam from the 8th century CE onwards.

On country level, the scenarios vary. There are multilingual countries with one dominant language that is used by a majority of the population as first or second language. There are also countries with up to hundreds of languages, with no single language being used by a majority of the population. Examples of the first type are, for instance, Botswana (Setswana), Lesotho (Sesotho), Madagascar (Malagasy), Rwanda and Burundi (Kinyarwanda/ Kirundi), Somalia (Somali), Swaziland (Siswati, Swazi). The other extreme includes countries like Nigeria (470-520 languages), Cameroon (ca. 280), D.R. Congo (ca. 220), Chad (ca. 130), and Tanzania (ca. 130).3 African countries could be grouped conveniently yet arbitrarily according to degrees of linguistic heterogeneity:

23 countries have less than 20 languages16 countries have between 20 and 50 languages11 countries have between 50 and 100 languages5 countries have between more than 100 and more than 500 languages

However, almost half of all African countries south of the Sahara have at least one language which is used by at least half of the population (Ouane & Glanz, 2010), to whatever level of competence. In some countries, two or three regionally dominant languages may reach up to 90 percent of the population (e.g. Niger: Hausa, Zarma; Nigeria: Yoruba, Igbo, Hausa; D. R. Congo: Kongo,

3 Figures are uncertain or vary according to sources and depending on what is counted as a separate language.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (85)

85H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

Lingala, Luba, plus originally exoglossic Swahili). Some countries, however, have no indigenous language that could reach any majority of the population (e.g. Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire). In quite a few African countries, therefore, one can say that the majority of the population is made up of (ethno-) linguistic ‘minorities’.

Addressing linguistic plurality and attempting to neutralize language barriers that interfere with effective country-wide communication, the colonial administrations imposed on the colonial territories what they thought would be a ‘neutral’ or ‘unifying’ language. The language chosen for this was that of the colonial master, resulting in the institutionalization of linguistic imperialism. The colonial ‘language of power’ immediately assumed high status and prestige, thus creating new patterns of polyglossia. It added a hegemonic language, but failed to achieve the desired goal of becoming a country-wide neutral and unifying lingua franca that would eventually replace most if not all local ‘minority’ languages. The African populations kept preferring African lingua francas as means of inter-ethnic communication rather than using the language of the colonizers for such purposes.

Linguistic plurality remains the major challenge for multilingualism management in Africa. For language policy design and implementation, various options are available. Clearly, hitherto practiced exoglossic monolingualism on the basis of ex-colonial languages has largely failed. Likewise, endoglossic official monolingualism has its drawbacks by failing to address increasing globalization, and by creating tensions among linguistic minorities that can be found in practically all countries. Therefore, endoglossic official monolingualism has not been considered a realistic option in any of the postcolonial African countries, to the possible exception of pre-civil war Somalia. Even Swahili in Tanzania (and later Kenya) has always remained ‘co-official’ with English.

2.2. Linguistic diversity

Linguistic diversity is here understood to relate to typological and genealogical differences between languages and language groups. Again, African countries face different and occasionally extreme scenarios. On the one hand, there are continental sub-regions with high degrees of typological similarity due to close genealogical relationship among languages; this is the case of so-called Bantu languages in eastern and southern Africa, occasionally described as forming so-called dialect continua. The more than 500 Bantu languages, which almost cover the southern half of the continent, form a closely related genealogical unit of languages, which share considerable typological similarities and common lexicon. The other extreme are territories, on which the density of languages of different genealogical affiliation and typological appearance is immense, like in the so-called Nigerian Middle Belt and along the Sudan-Ethiopian border. In somewhat intermediate position are zones of long and intense language contact, where convergence processes across genealogical boundaries have created massively shared ‘areal’ features, for

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (86)

86 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

instance, in the Macro-Sudan belt (Güldemann, 2008) along the southern edge of the Sahara, and in the so-called Ethiopian linguistic area (Crass & Meyer, 2008).

Although still being used as a convenient reference system, Joseph H. Greenberg’s (1963) classification of African languages into four geneticlanguage phyla (Niger-Congo, Afroasiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Khoisan) has beenquestioned by subsequent research and is, in parts, substituted by alternativeclassifications. These not only replace ‘Khoisan’ by five independent languagefamilies and ‘isolates’ (Khoe-Kwadi, Tuu, Kx’a, Sandawe, Hadza), but alsoallow for a fair number of other isolates, which together would push thenumber of possibly unrelated genetic linguistic units for African languagesto anything between 19 and more than 30 (cf. Heine 2019, with referenceto Dimmendaal [2008] and Nichols [1997]). Currently and subsequent toGreenberg’s seminal classification of 1963, the pendulum swings back from a‘lumping’ to a ‘splitting’ perspective on genetic language relationship in Africa.

In an applied linguistics perspective, linguistic diversity links up with the potentials of individual languages (or language varieties) for projects of language standardization and harmonization. These are particularly feasible in cases of ‘dialect continua’ and have worked well, for instance, in the case of ‘Akan’ in Ghana, but are blocked by political obstruction in view of a common ‘Nguni’ and ‘Sotho’ in South Africa, which is rooted in the history of apartheid.

2.3. The latitudinal diversity gradient

As an aside, it is worth pointing out that language plurality and diversity in Africa links up with the latitudinal diversity gradient known from biology. According to this gradient, botanical and zoological, but obviously also linguistic and cultural diversity increases with lower latitudes and closer to the Equator, while it diminishes with higher latitudes at greater distance to the Equator.

Consequently, Eurocentric perspectives virulent in the North rest on the territorial characteristics and historical experience of relatively low numbers of languages as well as low numbers of different genetic linguistic units.4 Europeans, therefore, consider the degree of linguistic plurality and diversity in the Global South to be exceptional and ‘exotic’, while in geo-biological and universal linguistic terms Europe represents the ‘odd’.

4 Linguistic diversity in Europe, for instance, is very low. 95 percent of all languages indigenous to Europe are of Indo-European affiliation, only 2,71 percent belong to the Uralic and 2,06 percent to the Altaic languages. Unique in Europe are Basque (a genetic ‘isolate’), and Maltese (Arabic; Semitic). (Ehlich 2009)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (87)

87H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

2.4. Numerical muscle: Linguistic ‘majorities’ and ‘minorities’

A similar situation prevails with regard to language size, i.e. number of first and second language speakers of individual languages. Again, the European experience is different from elsewhere on the globe; Konrad Ehlich (2009) describes Europe as an ‘oligoglot’ continent. Subsequent to centuries of European imperialism and colonialism, European languages have acquired exceptionally high numbers of speakers (mainly enlarged by second language-speakers in colonized territories), such as, for instance, English (58/600 million), Spanish (39/300 million), Russian (119/200 million), but also Portuguese and French.5

Regarding numbers of speakers, African languages match the global pattern: Only four percent of human languages have more than one million speakers (in Africa this would apply to 70-80 languages, reliable figures are not available). While only about 10 percent of all languages have between 100,000 and one million, about 75 percent have below 100,000 speakers. Half of all languages have even less than 50,000 speakers. These figures show that Europe and the North in general represent a sociolinguistic exception to the global pattern, and that living as a linguistic ‘minority’ is the most common pattern of human existence. Belonging to a linguistic ‘majority’, as a rule, is the result of exceptional historical processes of imperialist/colonialist expansion involving the language of one’s native or acquired linguistic identity.

3. Minoritizing languages: Europe’s obsession with the ‘ProjectNation’

Current language ideologies and attitudes in both the North and in Africa hinge on received Eurocentric W.E.I.R.D. (Western-European-Industrialized-Rich-Democratic) perspectives on ‘others’, including the condescending attitudes associated with Orientalism as described by Edward Said (1978), which mirror the experience of European exceptionalism (cf. Wolff, 2016, 2017). This particular mind-set links up historically and in largely subconscious collective memory with the Reconquista (culminating 1491/92 in the fall of the Islamic Emirate of Granada and reversing the direction of colonialism) which marked the beginning of European colonial expansion into Africa, parallel to the re-discovery of the Americas by Christoph Columbus. This introduced the Age of Discovery and the rise of European colonial empires, the Age of Enlightenment, the Commercial Revolution, the Scientific Revolution, and

5 The first figure quoted refers to number of mother tongue speakers in Europe, the second inclu- des L2-speakers outside Europe. The figures are taken from Ehlich (2009), who also points out that out of worldwide 12 languages that are spoken by 100 million or more, six are from Europe. Five of them mirror massive colonial expansion by European powers: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, French, plus German. (The other six languages are Chinese, Hindi, Arabic, Indonesian, Bengali, and Japanese.)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (88)

88 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

finally the Industrial Revolution. It has fostered basically racist and Social Darwinist attitudes based on assumptions about the supremacy of the White Man, implying ‘superiority’ also of European languages and civilizations over the ‘inferior’ ones of so-called natives and savages on other continents.

This mind-set has impacted, through colonial and postcolonial education, the postcolonial elites currently in power in Africa, who still follow models provided by the former colonial master in an uncritical copy-and-paste manner. This has severe repercussions on implicit or explicit state philosophy and ideology, in particular as regards the Eurocentric notion of nation state, which serves as model for most post-independence African governments. The 18th and 19th century idealistic and national-romantic ideology surrounding the notion of a largely hom*ogenous nation described by the monistic ideal of ‘one state – one nation – one language’ has its roots in the philosophy of Johann Gottfried Herder (1744-1803) and Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762 - 1814) in Germany. It is, however, in essential contradiction to the sociolinguistic realities of Africa’s historically overcome complex and diverse ethnic, linguistic and cultural fabric. Hence the attempt of the former colonial powers to create ideally hom*ogenous linguistic and civilizational landscapes in the colonial territories. They either followed a policy of linguistic and cultural assimilation of the colonized populations, as in the cases of France and Portugal, or of imposing a ‘neutral’ and ‘unifying’ official language, i.e. that of the colonial master, on at least a minority of colonial collaborators which was to be expanded eventually to serve all official functions and purposes in communication across the territory, including formal education. In keeping with the nation-state ideology most familiar to them, the common target was exoglossic o icial monolingualism, as it indeed has become most widely implemented in post-colonial Africa.6

3.1. Language and nation building in Europe, colonialism and linguistic imperialism in Africa

Following Ehlich (2009: 28), coming along with the transition from medieval to modern times, Europe underwent a process of massive hom*ogenization with regard to the language situation. Western and Central Europe saw the emergence of powerful lingua francas beyond hegemonic Latin by the empowerment of local vernaculars, particularly on the territories of present-day France, Germany and Italy. Towards the end of the 18th century, these processes were dramatically accelerated by the ‘Project 6 The case of Cameroon is unique in so far as a territory formerly underGerman colonial adminis- tration was divided after 1918 between France and Great Britain. The later united postcolonial state still operates with two exoglossic official languages, namely French and English, which until today poses severe threats to national unity. Countries that were not colonized by European powers, like Liberia and Ethiopia, escaped the external imposition of a former colonial language; nevertheless, English has acquired a prominent status also here by national language policies.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (89)

89H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

Nation’. Subsequent to the French Revolution (1789-99), feudalistic forms of government became replaced by increasingly democratic forms, with the notion of ‘nation’ linked to that of ‘national language’ and serving as ideological driving engine. The common language served as both symbol and means of ‘national’ unification and identity, accompanied by ‘minoritization’ of other languages on the national territory, i.e. by increasing marginalization if not annihilation (for instance, in the case of the Celtic languages in Great Britain and other autochthone smaller languages elsewhere). The approach to the emerging concept of ‘nation-state’ was monistic: one country – one nation – one language. The country’s state philosophy became that of a hom*ogenous nation state, often with a ‘titular nation’ which gave its name to the whole country (French/France, German/Germany, Italian/Italy, Polish/Poland, Danish/ Danmark, Swedish/Sweden, etc.), and which also designated the common ‘national language’, which in turn fostered the emergence and proliferation of a ‘national literature’ as part of ‘national culture’. Accompanying these processes was the institutionalization of language academies, like the Accademia della Crusca in Florence, the various language societies in Germany, or the Académie française in France.

Language empowerment with regard to formerly unwritten vernaculars in Europe further provided the basis for linguistic and cultural imperialism that accompanied European colonialism across the globe. As Ehlich (2009:31) continues to say, even after colonialism as such came to end by the mid- 20th

century, linguistic imperialism prevailed via continued hegemonic dominance of the former colonial languages in the postcolonies. Culturally, even apparently new concepts like négritude in Africa or postcolonial literature in more general terms still echo linguistic imperialism stemming from colonialism by using the same ‘language of power’. Note, also, that sharing the same hegemonic language forms the basis for post-colonial global pressure groups like, for instance, the Arabic League, the Commonwealth of Nations, the Communidade dos Países de Língua Portuguesa and Países africanos de língua oficial portuguesa, the Nederlandse Taalunie, the Organisation internationale de la francophonie, etc.

3.2. Language and ‘trans-nation’ states in Africa

Post-independence political elites in Africa adopted models of so-called nation building, which are rooted in European 19th century national-romantic ideology, and which is captured in the notion of ‘nation state’. The ideology behind postulates largely hom*ogenous societies and necessitates monolingual options for language policies regarding the choice of the official language of the state. In the case of former colonial territories, this meant official exoglossic monolingualism, i.e. hegemonic imposition of a language of power which is foreign to the territory and the population. Exactly this is what has been implemented by post-colonial language policies across most parts of Africa. Yet, there are no ‘nations’ in Africa comparable to the situation in 19th

and 20th century Europe, apart from numerically relatively strong linguistic

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (90)

90 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

majorities with several million speakers. Such majorities could have feasibly formed European-type ‘nation states’ on African territories. This, however, was no option for the post-colonial independent countries, whose borders had been almost haphazardly cut out in the context of the notorious Berlin Congo Conference in 1884/85, cutting across territories occupied by such potential majorities and lumping together up to several hundred distinct linguistic and cultural groups.

In most cases in Africa, at independence no single ethnolinguistic group could claim the status of being or becoming the titular nation of a European-type nation state.7 Therefore, also the notion of ‘national language’ makes little sense.8 Therefore, I suggest to speak of ‘trans-nation states’ in post-colonial Africa, which would need to develop their own philosophy and strategies for creating political and ideological unity beyond any single ‘nation’ and reflecting ethnic and linguistic plurality, and definitely not by copying the nation-state model stemming from colonialist Europe. By necessity and regarding language policy and planning, such strategies would involve institutionalized multilingualism based on both endoglossic and at least one exoglossic language.

Currently, the African postcolonies mirror a sociolinguistic paradox. We find minoritarian exoglossic languages of high status and hegemonic dominance, which are mostly enshrined in the Constitutions as official languages, but which have only limited if any numbers of first-language speakers (South Africa being a notable exception with regard to both English and Afrikaans). They are faced by relative majorities of populations, who prefer using African languages (often more than one) and only occasionally, if at all, resort to using the ex-colonial official language; and if so, it is used only in rather restricted domains. As a rule, the ex-colonial official language of the post-colonial state has little if any function as lingua franca among the masses of the African populations. However, among opinion leaders in minority elitist and intellectual circles, who are defined by ‘Western’ education based on a European language, this language serves both as icon of class membership and, indeed, as preferred lingua franca. However, membership in this post-colonial class of oligarchs is low in numbers and is mainly found in the capital and other major cities. Their members serve in governmental

7 Potential exceptions on the African continent would have been post-colonial Botswana, Burundi, Rwanda, Lesotho, Somalia, and Swaziland.

8 Note that the term ‘national language’ is not unequivocally defined in the context of Africa. In some cases, it designates a recognized status for some or all of the African languages spoken on the state territory (de jure national language). In other cases, the term refers to a lingua franca whose distribution covers most or all of the country’s territory, yet without officially recognized status (de facto national language). In other cases again, the term is reserved for selected indigenous languages, which officially symbolize ‘national identity’ and/or ‘national unity’, i.e. which largely match the original European idea of a national language.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (91)

91H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

agencies and higher education or work in the – rather restricted – formal sector of economy, accounting for probably less than 20 percent of the country’s populace.

3.3. Polyglossia: Language empowerment, disempowerment & re-empowerment

In multilingual contexts, it may be almost impossible to avoid the emergence of polyglossia (also referred to as extended diglossia). By the term polyglossia I refer to significant differences in terms of prestige, status and power associated with different languages. The term reflects the difference between empowered and disempowered languages, to use terms stemming from language activism. In Africa, the polyglossia situation is extremely aggravated by the imposition of the language of the former colonial masters for official communication and formal education. Consequently, a foreign language ended up as official language enshrined in the Constitution of the in- dependent post-colonial state. As available sociolinguistic studies point out (cf. Ouane & Glanz, 2010, 2011), the prevailing polyglossia situation in Africa poses considerable challenges for designing language policies for effective and efficient country-wide communication and education. The high-status official (ex-colonial) languages neither serve as functional lingua francas that would overcome language barriers stemming from territorial multilingualism (except for certain urban quarters), nor do they allow quality education for the masses of the African populations. Disempowerment of the African languages during the colonial period has also disempowered the masses of their speakers. Sole beneficiaries were a minute group of colonial collaborators, who acquired the language of the colonial master to serve in the running and exploitation of the colonized territories. This small group of colonial collaborators and their offspring have become the post-colonial ruling ‘elite’ of the independent state, clinging to their privileges, and setting themselves apart from the ‘masses’ via their advanced command of the exoglossic language of power.

For full mental decolonization and effective mass education, African languages have to be re-empowered in order to overcome the dramatic polyglossia divide, which symbolizes and sustains the post-colonial class divide between minority ‘elite’ and the majority ‘masses’ within the country. Democratic participation presupposes effective country-wide multilingual communication that reaches all citizens independent of the accident of having been born into some minority community of linguistic practice.

Sustainable development presupposes access of all citizens to relevant information and knowledge. In the absence of feasible country-wide official monolingualism, which is the rule in Africa, only multilingual solutions will do the job. Multilingual solutions in Africa must rest on the democratic and Human Rights principle towards institutionalized re-empowerment of indigenous languages, a priori irrespective of numbers of speakers. However and rather than necessarily involving all existing mother-tongue languages, institutionalized multilingual solutions are feasible by exploiting

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (92)

92 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

the wide-spread pre-existing individual and sociocultural multilingualism across the continent by relying largely on Africa’s indigenous lingua francas. Institutionalization of multilingualism presupposes, however and on the other hand, active support by governments and a culturally active citizenry towards language codification, standardization and harmonization, in order to foster multilingual mass literacy and allow for the emergence of language-specific literatures, involving translations from and into other African and non-African languages.

4. Development communication

All development (in the common sense of a non-technical usage of the term) of human individuals, social groups and human-made societal, cultural and economic achievements are based on effective communication, involving transfer of information and knowledge. The most common channel of human communication is language, whether spoken or written. Sustainable ‘development’ (in the technical sense of the term) likewise presupposes effective communication. Effective development communication in Africa presupposes effective mass education, which remains largely unachieved in the current post-colonial states. Effective mass education under the conditions of ubi- quitous multilingualism in Africa presupposes effective systems of mother tongue-based multilingual education (MTBMLE).

Accordingly, ‘development communication’ is a central issue in the emerging subfield of Applied African Sociolinguistics (cf. Wolff, 2011, 2016, 2018). ‘Development communication’ is an ambiguous term that allows two equally important readings. On a theoretical and ideological level, it refers to all academic and political discourse on ‘development’. On a practical level, it refers to verbal interaction as part of ‘development intervention’ in particular on the grassroots level. Still, mainstream development discourse in the social sciences reflects little if any understanding of the linguistic dimension of development interaction. While the relationship between language(s) and development is largely ignored and remains hardly ever addressed in current mainstream social and economic science literature, sociolinguists and educationists have paid considerable attention to the relationship between language(s) and education. Yet, outside narrow expert circles, this relationship still remains poorly understood and reflected upon. A relationship between development and education has long been assumed as being axiomatic, yet little focused research has gone into this relationship with little if any effect on the amelioration of educational systems, in particular the underlying language-in-education policies that are currently in place in Africa. (Cf. Fig. 2, taken from Wolff 2011:53.)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (93)

93H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

[Little understood outsideexpert circles, particularly in terms of MoI vs. SoI]9

Fig. 2. Model of development communication with regard to language(s) and education

4.1. Language and education in Africa

Successful mass education is a prerequisite for sustainable development. In postcolonial Africa, operating formal education through foreign languages, which are (most) often poorly mastered by learners and teachers, is inefficient and ineffective. Yet, official exoglossic monolingualism is the most widely spread language policy practice in Africa; it amounts to a waste of human and considerable financial resources. The alternative option is mother tongue-based multilingual education (MTBMLE), which would involve African (minority, lingua franca) and non-African languages as medium of instruction and be practiced throughout all cycles of formal education, including higher education at university level. MTBMLE is needed in order to unleash the cognitive and creative potentials of learners by use of mother tongues or any (African) language that they are fully familiar with (cf. Ouane & Glanz, 2010, 2011). In a parallel fashion, hitherto disempowered indigenous languages would undergo automatic intellectualization and re-empowerment. Otherwise, Africa remains sitting low on the global scale of intellectual achievements and academic knowledge production.

4.2. The failure of exoglossic monolingualism in education

Recent sociolinguistic literature dealing with language-in-education issues has amply shown the failure of current educational systems in Africa

9 MoI = medium of instruction, SoI = subject of instruction

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (94)

94 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

which are based on exoglossic monolingualism and subtractive bilingual models (Ouane & Glanz, 2010, 2011). Three quotes from different eminent language-in-education experts may suffice to illustrate the gist of countless relevant studies in Africa.

“(I)n the case of Africa, the retention of colonial language policies in education contributes significantly to ineffective communication and lack of student participation in classroom activities. Moreover, it explains to a large extent the low academic achievement of African students at every level of the educational system.” (Alidou 2003: 95)

Most language models used in African education are designed to fail students. (Heugh 2007: 52)

“An idiotic situation exists that in many, if not most, instances the teacher and the class share the same home language, but the tuition has to be in a language in which none of the two parties is proficient”. (Kotze & Hibbert 2010: 12).

Clearly, therefore, the hitherto minoritized and disempowered African languages must become the default media of instruction for all educational cycles in Africa, with at least one ‘global’ language being professionally taught in order to enable learners to become competent multilingual individuals using both African and non-African languages.

4.3. Quality ‘mass education’ based on mother tongue-basedinstitutional multilingualism

The post-colonial education systems currently in place in most parts of Africa are ‘elitist’ and ‘exclusive’, allowing for and maintaining a ‘post-colonial class divide’ (Pierre Alexander). The new elites who have taken over the colonial state hence support bottle-neck systems for quality education via a foreign (ex-colonial) language, which restrict the access to their own ranks towards effective ‘elite closure’ (Carol Myers-Scotton). This is part of the ‘status quo maintenance syndrome’ (Neville Alexander) that secures the privileges of the new oligarchy. High fees for educational institutions that allow optimized access to the ex-colonial language inhibit the masses of the African populations and effectively keep them ‘down’. The new elites are largely characterized by their preference of exoglossic monolingual practices, which often accompanies strong negative attitudes towards the indigenous African languages that are hardly ever used, if at all they are still competently mastered, by members of the elites. Under this regime, mass education remains under-performing, mainly due to poor proficiency in the official (ex-colonial) language on the part of both teachers and learners, for as long as foreign languages serve as enforced medium of instruction.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (95)

95H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

Effective and efficient mass education would have to reflect the existing territorial multilingualism and honour the wide-spread practices of individual and sociocultural multilingualism (in more recent literature referred to as trans- or polylanguaging). African governments are thus challenged to design and implement language policies towards institutionalization of mother tongue-based multilingual education.

A parallel and desired effect would be quasi automatic intellectualization and re-empowerment of the African languages simply through acquiring status and prestige on the polyglossia scale by regular and institutionalized usage in so-called higher domains. These higher domains would encompass, among others, all public discourse on politics, culture, economics, law and philosophy, all fields of research and science, both in the natural sciences and the humanities and social sciences. For a number of languages, however, this would presuppose or entail extra efforts towards standardization, and possibly harmonization within groups of closely related languages or language varieties, and the creation of traditions of literature production and translations from and into these languages. This, in particular, would be among the prime responsibilities of, again, institutions of higher education, like universities, academies, and language-specific or overarching national centres for post-literacy development in all or selected ‘national languages’ of the particular country.

In this way, formerly minoritized and disempowered languages would acquire the potential to become re-integrated into officially recognized multilingual communication practices, as they are characteristic for communication in higher domains in the so-called developed countries of the North. Comprehensive language planning including ‘econolinguistics’ (Russell Kaschula), i.e. focused research on the applied dimensions of (multilingual) language practices in the workplace in globalizing economies, would reveal language as a major transformative engine to drive modernization and development towards global knowledge societies also in Africa (Kaschula & Wolff, in prep.).

5. Conclusion

In order to achieve sustainable development, Africa must free herself from neo-colonial dependence on knowledge imported from elsewhere wrapped in foreign languages, but rather follow the successful global model of operating education through both local and global languages, giving indigenous languages their proper place in education and society. For post-colonial Africa, this requires nothing less than a linguistic revolution. Ideologically, the target is full mental decolonization. This needs to be prepared for and be theoretically grounded in a long overdue linguistic turn in mainstream development discourse (cf. Wolff, 2016, 2017). This linguistic revolution would be based on a philosophy of African ‘transnation’ states, which embraces multilingualism and multiculturalism as essential and valued features of a

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (96)

96 PLURALITY AND DIVERSITY OF LANGUAGES IN AFRICA...

wider notion of African identity. Such philosophy and practice would attempt to neutralize polyglossia hierarchies among languages which are intrinsically based on racism and Social Darwinism. In this way, plurality and diversity of languages in Africa are likely to become assets for sustainable development on the continent.

References

Adegbija, E. (2000). Language Attitudes in West Africa. International Journal of the Sociology of Language (Issue on Sociolinguistics in West Africa), 141, 75–100.

Alidou, H. (2003). Medium of instruction in postcolonial Africa. In James W. Tollefson and Amy Tsui (Eds.) Medium of Instruction Policies: Which Agenda? Whose Agenda? (pp. 195-214). Florence, US: Routledge.

Crass, J. and Meyer, R. (2008). Ethiopia. In Bernd Heine and D. Nurse (Eds.) A Linguistic Geography of Africa (pp. 228-250). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dimmendaal, G. J. (2008). Language ecology and linguistic diversity on the African continent. Languages and Linguistics Compass, 2 (5), 840-858.

Ehlich, K. (2009). Sprachenpolitik in Europa – Tatsachen und Perspektiven. InC. Anthonissen and C. v. Maltzan (Eds.) Multilingualism and Langua- ge Policies

in Africa / Mehrsprachigkeit und Sprachenpolitik in Afrika. SPIL Plus 38, 26-41. Stellenbosch University: Department of Linguis- tics.

Heugh, K. (2007). Implications of the stocktaking study of mother-tongue and bilingual education in sub-Saharan Africa: who calls which shots? In P. Cuvelier, Th. du Plessis, M. Meeuwis, and L. Teck (Eds.) Multilingualism and Exclusion. Policy, Practice and Prospects (pp. 40-61). Pretoria: Van Schaik.

Greenberg, J. H. (1963). The Languages of Africa. The Hague: Mouton.Güldemann, T. (2008). The Macro-Sudan belt: towards identifying a linguistic

area in northern sub-Saharan Africa. In B. Heine and D. Nurse (Eds.) A Linguistic Geography of Africa (pp. 151-185). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Heine, B. (2019). A typological and areal perspective on African languages. In H. E. Wolff (Ed.) The Cambridge Handbook of African Linguistics (pp.

166-190) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Hollington, A. and Nassenstein, N.. (2019). African languages in urban contexts.

In H. E. Wolff (Ed.) The Cambridge Handbook of African Linguistics.(pp.535-554) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kaschula, R. H. and Wolff, H. E. (Eds.). (In prep.) The Transformative Power of Language. From Postcolonial to Knowledge Societies in Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kotze, E. and Hibbert L. (2010). Are Multilingual Education Policies Pipe Dreams? Identifying Prerequisites for Implementation. Alternation 17 (1), 4-26.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (97)

97H. EKKEHARD WOLFF

Lüpke, F. (2019). Language endangerment and language documentation in Africa. In H. E. Wolff (Ed.) The Cambridge Handbook of African Linguistics. (pp.468-490) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ngu gi wa Thiong’o. (1986). Decolonizing the Mind. The Politics of Language in African Literature. Nairobi: James Currey.

Nichols, J. (1997). Modelling ancient population structures and movement in linguistics. Annual Review of Anthropology 26, 359-384.

Ouane, A. and Glanz, C. (2010). Why and how Africa should invest in African languages and multilingual education. An evidence- and practice-based policy advocacy brief. Hamburg: UIL.

Ouane, A. and Glanz, C. (2011). Optimizing Learning, Education and Publishing in Africa: The Language Factor. Hamburg and Tunis: UIL and ADEA.

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism. New York: Pantheon.Simons, G. F. & Fennig, C. D. (Eds.). (2018). Ethnologue: Languages of the

World, Twenty-first edition. Dallas, Texas: SIL International. Online version: http://www.ethnologue.com.

Wolff, H. E. (2011). Background and history – language politics and planning in Africa. In A. Ouane and C. Glanz (Eds.) Optimizing Learning, Education and Publishing in Africa: The Language Factor (pp. 51-102). Hamburg and Tunis: UIL and ADEA.

Wolff, H. E. (2016). Language and Development in Africa. Perceptions, Ideologies and Challenges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wolff, H. E. (2017). Language ideologies and the politics of language in post- colonial Africa. In S. Mühr and R.Tirvassen (Eds.) Multilingualism in the Southern Hemisphere: a critical approach. SPIL Plus 51, 1-22. Stellenbosch University: Department of Linguistics.

Wolff, H. E. (2018). African socio- and applied linguistics. In T. Güldemann (Ed.) The Languages and Linguistics of Africa (pp. 883-977). Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter Mouton.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (98)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (99)

LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS. SOME UNDERESTIMATED

ELEMENTS OF LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY AND CULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY

Alícia Fuentes-Calle

Abstract: This article reflects on one dimension latent in linguistic/communication diversity which is usually ignored from the perspective of mainstream academia and global policy-making, including international agendas on linguistic diversity, preservation and revitalization. It is made visible by spiritual practices understood as manifestations of cultural diversity which channel alternative ways to experience language and communication beyond the prevailing referential approach. The linguistic and communication ideologies related to spiritual traditions offer a site of observation for the human experience of language considered in the continuum ordinary/poetic/sacred (leaving aside binary distinctions between those ‘categories’). Spiritual traditions can be considered frames that manifest the extreme realization of the communication ideology of a culture. They play therefore a relevant role in the configuration of language (semiotic) diversity.

Keywords: Linguistic diversity, spiritual traditions, poetics language and communication ideologies.

LENGUAS Y COMUNICACIÓN OBSERVADAS DESDE LA PERSPECTIVA DE LAS TRADICIONES ESPIRITUALES. ALGUNOS ELEMENTOS MENOS EXPLORADOS DE LA DIVERSIDAD LINGÜÍSTICA Y LA SOSTENIBILIDAD CULTURAL

Resumen: Este artículo aborda una dimensión latente en la diversidad lingüística que suele ser ignorada tanto por la lingüística

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (100)

100 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

académica como por las agendas políticas en defensa de la preservación y revitalización lingüísticas. Se trata del ámbito de las tradiciones y prácticas espirituales en tanto que manifestaciones de diversidad cultural que muestran modos alternativos de concebir y vivir el lenguaje y la comunicación (alternativos en el sentido de desbordar el enfoque referencial predominante). Las ideologías lingüísticas y de comunicación latentes en las tradiciones espirituales representan un buen observatorio para la experiencia humana del lenguaje considerada en el continuo que se extiende entre lo ordinario/lo poético/lo sagrado (huyendo de distinciones binarias y excluyentes entre esas categorías). Las tradiciones espirituales ofrecen, en cierto sentido, la realización extrema de las representaciones que sobre la comunicación vehicula una cultura. Cabe considerarlas, por tanto, una pieza relevante de la diversidad lingüística (y semiótica).

Palabras clave: diversidad lingüística, tradiciones espirituales, poética ideologías lingüísticas y de la comunicación.

Édouard Glissant, poet and author from La Martinique, director of Le Courier de l’UNESCO between1981 and 1988, used to say that multilingualism does not simply imply the coexistence or knowledge of many languages but rather (keeping in mind) ‘the presence’ of the languages of the world while using one´s own language.1

Glissant was thinking and writing in the European 90s, in the midst of a globalising optimism full of geopoetic promise that authors like him helped to make thrive, and he did so with linguistic diversity in mind.

One decade later, Mary Louise Pratt was preparing the UNESCO Seminar “Sharing Intangible Cultural Heritage: Narratives and Representations,” held in 2009 in Oaxaca. On that occasion, as published later on her “Travelling Languages: Toward A Geolinguistic Imagination” (2013), Pratt admitted: “I have begun to suspect that the absence of reflection on language is a condition of possibility for the knowledge-makers of globalization, the foundational silence that makes it possible for globalization to be imagined as it is being imagined”.

The claim was that while most people who work on languages are expected to include “the global” as a dimension of their imagination, language is not so systematically considered (in a meaningful way) on the agenda of globalisation’s stakeholders, researchers and activists – as we have recently seen, once more, in the absence of an explicit reference to languages in the

1 ‘[L]e multilinguisme ne suppose pas la coexistence des langues ni la connaissance de plusieurs langues mais la présence des langues du monde dans la pratique de la sienne’ Glissant (1995).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (101)

101ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

A twofold crisis of language

Having said that, after some 30 years of efforts on linguistic diversity campaigns promoted by international organisations – governmental and non-governmental alike – we should admit a sense of dissatisfaction among language researchers and activists, who are hoping and claiming for more action, more visible changes, and better results. One wonders if some critical reflection on the preservation/revitalisation approaches would be helpful, if there were not, at a certain stage, a diagnosis error.

Besides that phenomenon, we have been experiencing, in many instances of our societies and at more intimate levels, some indexes of a nebulous crisis (transformation) not only regarding the so called “linguistic diversity” and its ongoing decrease in numbers, but, at a smaller scale, a crisis of the human experience of language and communication. Symptoms of that crisis are present at different levels: referential, when our experience of space/time in the digital environment is not fully conveyed by traditional linguistic categories; interactional, when the notions of person(hood) and the experience of intersubjectivity encoded in our linguistic practices mutate in contemporary communication environments; and as a related phenomenon, among several others that could be added to the list, the transformation and extinction of conversational patterns and habits (when not of the very practice of face-to-face communication itself).

One of the obvious factors that explain that crisis (transformation) is the dramatic change undergone by communication cultures and ethoi2. The transformation of the communication ecosystems where linguistic diversity happens, thrives or dies via indigenous communities in historic territories of origin, communities in traditional multilingual settings, migrant speaking communities generating multilingual contexts especially via urbanisation, etc. Massive human movements over the last decades along with the digital culture are transforming the previous landscapes and generating highly diverse societies worldwide which transform previous communication cultures and linguistic ideologies.

Rethinking our concepts and experience of language

It is against this background, as it is highlighted more and more in current research, that language is being “rediscovered” as a real-time

2 We could define communication ethos as the set of “prominent values of interaction -- ways of interpreting and of sharing experiences” transmitted by “different identities or cultural legacies from one generation to another“ Khubchandani (1989).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (102)

102 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

phenomenon of interactional creativity.3 It is a “rediscovery” confirmed by the actual life of language in its contemporary digital avatars, as well as in the contemporary multilingual networks in complex urban environments (Blommaert 2013, 2014).

This is a realisation that is imposing itself after many decades of overemphasis on reference, on language as representation, which is a local linguistic ideology that succeeded in expanding globally with some enduring consequences. Among them, the fact that many of the well-established methodologies used across disciplines dealing with social and cultural aspects of language were developed when reference-centred views of language (structuralist and generative) were still dominant4. And it could be argued, this linguistic ideology (very productive nonetheless as a hypothesis for theoretical work) is at the root of conventional approaches to language policy theory and practice, and of main international revitalisation programmes.

This notion of reference has been taken to the extreme and yielded some observable effects. In this regard, we can look especially at some processes that literature describes as “resignification of language” (Flubacher & Del Percio, 2017). These imply that traditional views of language – a resource for making meaning, for self-expression and communication, and in the case of learning additional languages, a means for relativising one’s world view (Kramsch, 1993) – are “resignified” towards other forms. We can just have a glimpse of a couple of types: codes and emblems.

Codes. As in global language(s), via an instrumental and commodified perspective. The prototypical case would be English – in its condition of global lingua franca – but also, by extension, the case for other foreign

3 Reflection proposed, just to name an example, by the Open Research Seminar held on Nov. 4th, 2016 at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU): Stretching the old concept of human communication - or creating a new one?

4 From the introduction text of seminar ref. on note 3: “More and more researchers in the language sciences and the social sciences agree that language must be viewed as situated, real-time, creative interaction rather than as a pre-established system of rules and form-meaning units. Yet what are the consequences of such a view for empirical approaches to communication? Many of the well-established methodologies used across disciplines (such as language socialization approaches, social semiotics, critical linguistics, discourse analysis and Conversation Analysis) were developed when structuralist and generative views of language were still dominant. Does the newly emerging perspective on language challenge the continued use of these methods and what consequences does it carry to empirical methodology in communication studies on the whole? To what extent does the new perspective on language involve the creation of a radically original standpoint on human communication as opposed to merely ‘stretching the old’?” (emphasis added).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (103)

103ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

languages5. "English would be no longer a foreign language, but rather a kind of foundational knowledge, or basic skill for globalization" (Cha and Ham, 2008).

Codes also as in “pseudo-revitalised” “languages”. More often than not, the promotion and revitalisation of endangered languages might eventually account for the conversion of such languages in mere codes. Codes that translate the conceptual system of the languages that generated the dominant cultures which rule the economic life where those speakers live (or survive). Such speakers might end up wondering (as Richard Zane Smith from the Wyandott community)6 “Might this forced and continual translation of noun based colonized terms into indigenous terms be actually turning our languages into codes to basically think the same thoughts but to represent them as indigenous characters and sounds? Are we paradigm shifting basic-thought pattern of our languages when we do this?”.

Emblems. Like static images. As in postvernaculars. Languages become in this case emblems of cultures crystallised in an “authentic” past. Either as a response to “revitalisation” claims (where transmission/education eventually reduces their scope to some traditional words and idioms), or as a response to processes of cultural branding and tourist marketing. B. Pivot (2014) describes the case of Rama (Nicaragua) and Franco-Provençal (France).

As suggested earlier, besides this resignification of languages we can identify a phenomenon that goes hand in hand, a sense of crisis (transformation) affecting the human relation to language and communication patterns. Identified, on one hand, in the fact that linguistic interaction in conversation needs to be publicly reclaimed as in Turkle (2015) and, on the other, in the fact that much of our general experience of language can be experienced as routine/cliché. As if a parallel extinction was also occurring in our personal relation to language. It is the case for what can be perceived as a certain tedium lurking in fossilized linguistic practices. As George Steiner (1989) puts

5 One extreme recent example in this regard is to be found in a controversy that has arisen in the United States educational environment through the CODES Act (July 12th 2018), which would allow high school students to take a coding class in place of a foreign language class in order to fulfil a graduation requirement. This assumes that the knowledge and human experience attained from (foreign) language learning and computer science (coding) are equivalent and transferable. https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr6334 Status: Introduced on Jul 11, 2018 This bill was introduced into Congress on July 11, 2018. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole. Prognosis: 4% chance of being enacted according to Skopos Labs.

6 Contribution by Richard Zane Smith, Wyandotte Oklahoma at the ILAT (Indigenous Languages and Technologies) mailing list, 21 Oct. 2010.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (104)

104 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

it: "Used (misused) as some kind of representational grid or facsimile of ‘the real’, language has indeed withered to inert routine and cliché".

Anecdotal situations of diverse types can be experienced all the time. We can be invited not to waste human energy with given topics of conversation and be countered “you can Google it” when asking for some piece of information, for instance. The referential word is left to the machine. Is there in progress a new culture of the word which refuses (or displaces to the non-human sphere) the merely instrumental language? As noted above, referential language has been at the centre of linguistic theory and Western linguistic ideologies over the last decades and has been at the original core of information/digital culture. Are societies which drove that sort of communication development claiming now for an enhanced experience of the word?

The ordinary, the poetic and the sacred (word)

The attempts to cope with these transformations take place usually in the ‘domain of art’ as far as the secularised West is concerned. The poetic perspective plays the role of the sacred in societies where the sacred has been set apart. As we might have experienced on some occasion, genuine poets and artists, those who deal with language electricity, somehow know that the best way in which language relates to the world, is not when trying to represent it (the referential mode), but when engaged in creating it.

Rowan Williams, in The Edge of Words (2014), the publication of his Gifford Lectures7 expresses:

‘The origins of linguistic capacity lie in pitched and differentiated sound allied to gesture (including dance); the body enters into a process of seeking continuity with what is both sensed internally and perceived externally. (…) ‘Language’, writes McGilchrist, ‘is a hybrid. It evolved from music and in this part of its history represented the urge to communicate (…). Its origins lie in the body and the world of experience. But referential language (…) did not originate in a drive to communicate … It has done everything

7 The Gifford Lectures (hosted by the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, St. Andrews and Aberdeen) “promote and diffuse the study of Natural Theology in the widest sense of the term” https://www.giffordlectures.org/ Some of the Gifford Lectures over the years have been occasionally presented by reputed linguists or focused on language and communication, e.g.: 2013–14 Lord Rowan Williams of Oystermouth Making representations: religious faith and the habits of language; 2001 Brian Hebblethwaite, George Lakoff, Lynne Baker, Michael Ruse & Philip Johnson-Laird The Nature and Limits of Human Understanding, etc.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (105)

105ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

it can to repudiate both its bodily origins and its dependency on experience – to become a world unto itself’ (emphasis added).

Illustration of this conception of language is to be found, for example, in postdramatic theatre as defined by Lehmann (2006), both in his reclaiming Platonic chora8 and in his restitution of language in its physical presence and weight.9 An experience of language long forgone in the linguistic ideology prevailing in globalised culture. It is, however, an experience and conception of language which in many cases naturally belongs to the communication ideologies embedded in spiritual traditions that are also part of contemporary culture.

Some conceptions and experiences of languages encoded in spiritual practices

Those experiences and conceptions of language are for the most part closer to the interactional or (trans/form)actional than to the representational side of language. This can be appreciated in the notions underlying communication-related practices such as different kinds of prayer and religious rituals -- a periodic habit for a high proportion of the world’s population to be inferred from the numbers relating to religious affiliation10 (statistics relating to prayer are available for specific religious groups).11

Prayer can indeed realise different levels of communication that have been made opaque by ordinary linguistic use: the boundaries of the category of “the person” which is co-created in relation to the category of ”the divine”;

8 “The chora is something like an antechamber and at the same time the secret cellar and foundation of the logos of language. It remains antagonistic to logos. Yet as rhythm and enjoyment of sonority it subsists in all language as its ‘poetry’.”

9 Lehnmann exemplifies an art of language which radically activates the poetics latent in logos, beyond the instrumental and finalist (telos) approach to language: Instead of a linguistic re-presentation of facts, there is a ‘position’ of tones, words, sentences, sounds that are hardly controlled by a ‘meaning’ but instead by the scenic composition, by a visual, not text oriented dramaturgy (Lehmann 2006: 147).

10 According to The Global Religious Landscape. A Report on the Size and Distribution of the World’s Major Religious Groups as of 2010 https://www.pewforum.org/2012/12/18/global-religious-landscape-exec/ a demographic study of more than 230 countries and territories conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life: “Worldwide, more than eight-in-ten people identify with a religious group” (…) “There are 5.8 billion religiously affiliated adults and children around the globe, representing 84 percent of the 2010 world population of 6.9 billion”.

11http://globalreligiousfutures.org/explorer/custom#/?countries=World-wide&quest ion=309&subtopic=37&year=recent&chartType=map&an-swer=14110&religious_affiliation=all&gender=all&age_group=all

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (106)

106 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

the act of recalling God, by which reciprocally God recalls the person who prays (as in the Sufi dhikr, the Lord’s Prayer in Orthodox Christianity and other kinds of mantra); traditions (as some Buddhist practices) in which language is not an abstraction but experienced by believers as a physical substance that comes into contact with the senses, or as an experience that takes language to its limits (as in Zen koan practice).

As stated in the presentation of the panel “Presence, absence, and space-time in sacred language”12: Sacred language is frequently chronotopic13 and it encodes and regulates profound relationships between its users and the tangible and intangible space-time worlds they inhabit or seek to invoke. (…) Drawing on examples from indigenous communities from across the globe, we will consider the sacred, social, and physical worlds indexed and acknowledged through deixis, evidentiality, performance, and spatio-temporal frames. In other words, language is used in those cases to create the sacred space/time and the sacred link of human interaction in that context.

We can consider, in this vein, the case of Yucatec Maya, as we can appreciate through the vast research undertaken by linguistic anthropologist Bill Hanks (1990, 2000, 2006). In one of his latest papers, Hanks (2017) presents an overview of time reckoning in several domains of Maya language and culture.14

Ritual practices display the most dramatic cyclicity, compounded by sedimentation, deictic time, historical time and cosmological space. Their chronometric dimensions are so elaborate that rituals can be considered a time machine. Viewed from practice, there is no single modality of Maya time, but a diachronic synchronization of multiple temporal streams which produces time as the variable product of tzol reproduction and meyah ‘work.’

The entanglement of the categories of the person/space/time, articulated through representation, interaction and performance is thus a feature of linguistic practices in the context of spiritual traditions. Linguistic practices taken to the extreme – a metalinguistic exploration of limits as it were. Extreme semiotics that encodes a communication ethos particular of the culture and arguably reminiscent in the community’s ordinary conception of and relation to language.

12 Organised by Margaret Bender and David Tavárez for the AAA Annual Meeting-- American Anthropological Association 2019, in the context of The Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019) declared by the United Nations.

13 I.e. very much gravitating around the configuration of (sacred) time and space through linguistic resources.

14 “(…) as observed in the Sierra region of Yucatan in the last decades of the twentieth century”.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (107)

107ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

Those examples invite us to venture that, to a certain degree, spiritual traditions correspond to experiences of (what could be termed) “radical communication”. A certain way of perceiving and experiencing language which belongs to alternative communication ideologies nonetheless present in contemporary culture, coexisting in our highly diverse societies. A factor lesser explored, generally ignored, but nonetheless present and active, in a varying degree, in linguistic diversity.

What might, from an external view, be labelled as spiritual, can be perceived internally as the ordinary epistemological/ontological mode. A matter of perspective as in many other regards: what is poetic for language x turns out to be ordinary for language y, for example; or what is perceived as paranormal in culture x is an accepted experience of time for culture y, etc etc. And as usual, the corresponding hierarchies of knowledge and the ensuing exclusions and displacements – displacements to different destinations away from the core of officially accepted ontologies which constitute the knowledge we live by; displacement to the territories of art, religion, anthropology, history, literature… Epistemic hierarchies that are however being questioned in some academic environments sensitive to the historicity of knowledge15.

In this regard, it could be suggested that spiritual traditions be considered as relevant elements of how communities articulate their sense of communication16, articulating to that purpose semiotic resources which are representational, interactional and performative. Resources which ground in good measure the way languages organise many of their semantic categories.

We could therefore think of a most probable entanglement between the spiritual creativity of communities and the history of communication. A factor that can obviously just be mentioned here, but can be claimed as a relevant component of the diversity of linguistic communication.17

The fact that spiritual practices are relevant in general linguistic/communication ideologies has been the object of some consideration so far. This is the case of the research undertaken, for instance, by the social anthropologist Joel Robbins. In “God is Nothing But Talk: Modernity, Language and Prayer in a Papua New Guinea Society” Robbins (2001a) describes the process by which the Urapnim in New Guinea relate to Christianity as exotic

15 Reclaiming Religion as knowledge: https://newhistoryofknowledge.com/2019/04/24/religion-as-knowledge/

16 As can be explored, for instance, from the perspective of evolutionary religious studies focused on the role that religion plays in the emergence of complex societies and in the evolution of human cooperation and intersubjectivity.

17 “Language, or better linguistic communication, is thus not any kind of object, formal or otherwise; rather it is a form of social action constituted by social conventions for achieving social ends, premised on at least some shared understandings and shared purposes among users.” (Tomasello, 2008).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (108)

108 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

culture not as much in the sense of an alien system of beliefs but in the sense of the alien linguistic ideology that is embedded in that spiritual practice – i.e. an “exotic” set of cultural representations about the relation between language/communication and being human: “At the center of this struggle for the Urapmin is an attempt to accommodate a traditional listener-oriented semiotic to the speaker-oriented one of modernity” (Robbins 2001a:909).

In “Ritual Communication and Linguistic Ideology: A Reading and Partial Reformulation of Rappaport’s Theory of Ritual” Robbins (2001b) advocates for the need to take into account ideologies of language in any framework that studies ritual as communication, as he illustrates with examples from Protestant18 and Melanesian19 rituals after exposing “the firm links between linguistic and ritual ideologies” being at work on those cases, and presumably in many other. The author goes on to argue “it would perhaps be profitable to adopt some term of art such as ideologies of communication to refer to a culture’s whole set of ideas about how information flows between people and between people and the natural and supernatural worlds.”

18 “Western concern with the emptiness of ritual arose hand in hand with changes in the understanding of language. (…) people who believe that language can convey truth have little need for ritual to perform this function. Ritual becomes suspect as too potentially profligate: it can make truth about people even where the inner conditions that should support that truthmaking are absent. (…) In some cases, those who come together for charismatic worship may spend almost all of the time they are in each others presence engaged in ritual. A well documented case is that of the Toronto Blessing, a charismatic movement that has its center at a church on the grounds of Torontos Lester B. Pearson International Airport. (…) In this case, pilgrims come together in one of late modernity’s paradigmatic nonplaces to form transient social relations based almost entirely on ritual (…). In this context, where middleclass people can no longer trust that everyone they meet face to face or in some other way is guided by Protestantisms sincerity culture, they are increasingly turning to ritual as a way of being together and communicating shared commitments to one another. If this is in fact the case, then the revival of Protestant ritual life is as intimately tied to changes in language ideology as was its original decline. This time, however, it is language that is becoming hollow and ritual that is once again full and fulfilling.

19 “According to LiPumas report, the Maring share with many other Melanesians a view of language as not well suited to the communication of truth: language was thought to lie on the skin of an action; it was the primary means of disguising the true intentionality of an actor (p. 164). The notion that speech primarily disguises intentions and is an unreliable channel for learning about the meanings of what goes on in the world was, until very recently, nothing more than common sense among the Maring (p. 166). It was, that is to say, an important feature of Maring linguistic ideology. With this information in hand, the Maring of Rappaports accounts come to look much like the other Melanesian groups we have considered: they value ritual for its ability to produce kinds of certainty that speech cannot provide” (emphasis added).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (109)

109ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

It is worth insisting that it is not a matter of a binary distinction ordinary/poetic, ordinary/sacred, but a matter of degree. In this sense, the perspective offered to us by spiritual practices as a particular domain of communication sheds light on some dimensions of linguistic communication that have become opaque.

Two of those dimensions are a particular sense of truth (word and ergon), and the ritual factor of interaction. They are just briefly mentioned here.

Word and truth

There is a particular sense of truth that could be considered a trace of linguistic ideology to be found in spiritual traditions. One explicit manifestation is offered by Christian texts, in Matthew 12:34-3720: “(…) everyone will have to give account (…) for every empty word they have spoken”. In the original Greek version: rema argon – (a-ergon) “word with no energy”.

The vain word that does not do what it says, that does not work (operate), that does not perform what its sound expresses.21 The ergon word understood as word ‘with energy’, that is fruitful. True word not in the sense of propositional truth, but in the sense of truly communicating the continuity/fine-tuning of the human to the world as in Williams’ words above, "the body enters into a process of seeking continuity with what is both sensed internally and perceived externally".

Extreme semiotics

Michael Silverstein in his comments to Robbins (2001b) expresses the continuity between ritual and language (a factor of a culture´s semiotics): "Ritual is just a manifestation of the semiotics of culture in its extreme form (…). Ritual’s properties are integral to language even in its supposedly pure denotational capacity".

It is worth insisting that it is not the case for elements (truth of a certain kind, ritual as word in action) that belong to a separated, extraordinary bubble of culture, but intrinsic ingredients that manifest in different forms and in different degrees in communication and language broadly understood. Ingredients which are transparent in explicit, ritualised, spiritual practice, and more or less opaque in ordinary communicative practices.

20 Nestle-Aland (1981).

21 Rema argòn è quindi la parola vana, che non fa ciò che dice, che non opera, non attua quel che il suo suono esprime. Panikkar (2007).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (110)

110 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

Spiritual traditions can be conceived of, to a high degree, as frames that manifest the extreme realisation of the communication ideology of a culture.

A gap to be bridged?

In general terms, however, initiatives addressed to preserve and revitalise languages usually connect with the referential/structural dimension of those languages as objects of knowledge, of a particular approach to knowledge preservation and reproduction. Spiritual traditions are however a reservoir, in their ritual/related forms and patterns, of “the semiotics of culture in its extreme form”. They are therefore a locus, albeit not of conventional linguistic diversity as it is defined by international organisations and mainstream academia, of communication diversity and of alternative linguistic ideologies.

Those alternative communication and linguistic ideologies might be

closer however to current trends in the experience of language. An experience which is increasingly framed in communication environments that challenge traditional notions of (inter)subjectivity.

In this regard, diverse voices claim the need to:

• “rethink and challenge the empirical adequacy of the individual/society binary that informs social sciences” (Wooffitt 2018);

• undertake a fine-grained exploration of communication – challenging assumptions on personal boundaries – crucial to revisit some of the basic tenets of our culture:

o personhood and subjectivity; o the conditions in which cultures emerge – “culture as a subsys tem of the communication system”, communication as “the very material of which culture is made” (Knoblauch, H. and H.Kotthoff, 2001); o as well as much of our conventional approach to what counts as

knowledge22 based on local assumptions and practices of com munication as a: * dyadic (sender-message-receiver), * logo-centric (focused on referential language), * and information-oriented practice.

As one possible example among many others, this account on the experience of language among the Worora (Australia) might be useful to discloses some of the densely packed elements above (Van der Aa & Blommaert, 2014):

22 B. Sousa Santos (2007): “Throughout the world, not only are there very diverse forms of knowledge of matter, society, life and spirit, but also many and very diverse concepts of what counts as knowledge”.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (111)

111ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

The more you look carefully at Hindu theories of use of language, you also see that what you are talking about is a system of praxis, i.e. it’s all about performativity, since ‘understanding’ in the philosophical system we’re talking about, understanding is really being transformed in a very essential way. Communication is always performative and the notion that there is merely, if you will, a signans and a signatum, signifiant or signifié, sign vehicle and the concept, is really not what it is about.

Exploring some initiatives: Linguapax puts into conversation linguistic and religious diversity

It is in the spirit described so far that Linguapax carried out during two editions, 2017 and 2018, a line of enquiry about linguistic and religious diversity. It was driven by an attempt to make explicit this unobvious layer of semiotic/linguistic diversity which is also present in global cities such as Barcelona. An exploration of how religious diversity channels different linguistic perspectives. To what extent linguistic diversity does not just include a variety of codes, what we call ‘languages’, but also a plurality of ways by which humans represent and experience language and communication.

During the first edition, in November 201723, Linguapax gathered members of different traditions –Judaism, Sikhism, Islam, Buddhism – around some common subjects that made explicit variation of linguistic ideologies embedded in spiritual practices. The goal was to present those elements as part of the cultural and linguistic diversity coexisting in the city – beyond the mere acknowledgement of the sacred/ ritual languages channelling some of the traditions (Hebrew, Arabic, Sanskrit, etc). Some of the topics discussed by participants, either in the public presentation or during our working sessions, included:

• The relative prominence in their spiritual practice of the oral and the written word, of voice and the physiological component of the word and its presence and weight, vibration, in the environment.

• How different, to what extent, were their language usages in ordinary and sacred domains. In particular, their experience of the power of the word, many times made obvious through its negative side, as the word that must be avoided.

• What different semiotic perspectives are at play: a semiotics of speaking (“talking to God”), which is generally the semiotic ethos prevalent in Western societies, or a semiotics of listening (“listening to God”), as mentioned earlier in Robbins (2001a).

23 http://www.linguapax.org/english/what-we-do/linguapax-30-years-confe-rence-on-languages-and-spiritual-traditions

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (112)

112 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

How this translates in particular spiritual practices, such as prayer.

Also, as mentioned above, an aspect that cuts across spiritual traditions, radical poetics and communication: the centrality of understanding and uttering words from the heart (the heart-mind in a spiritual sense – the ergon word).

The second edition, November 2018,24 was held in the framework of the Year of Panikkar. Raimon Panikkar25, theologian and philosopher, was of Catalan and Indian descent; Christian, Hindu and Buddhist, as he used to describe himself. He was a living example of transiting cultures with grace and intellectual generosity, through very personal insights: his cosmoteandric intuition as the key to reading the real, i.e. the presence, in everything there is, of the human, cosmic and divine dimensions at the same time. The seminar didn’t evolve around Panikkar’s thought, but was very much in the wake of his particular experiential philosophy. We gathered views of different spiritual traditions in relation to language (see Panikkar, 2017): • Agusti Paniker introduced some elements on how from the Indian

cultural perspective, a context permeated by a dense plurilingual ethos, grammatical theory and the experience of the sacred intermingle and share fuzzy boundaries.

• The panel shared by Halil Barcena, Raquel Bouso and Genner Llanes offered some glimpses of how spiritual practices include alternative experiences of language:

• Halil Bárcena described Islamic calligraphy as a practice lived and conceived of as voiced writing, where text is vibration -- calligraphy transforms written text into visual music. It is not expected from the calligrapher to impress through the senses, but to be true.

• Raquel Bouso, gave us an account of how, in Zen Buddhism, genuine communication is with no words. Words are used as channels for meaning but are discarded (left with no use) when it comes to true communication in the heart-mind.

• Genner Llanes, highlighted how performativity and verbal arts add variation to prayer styles in the context of Mayan ritual – in this regard, how more frequent contacts between speakers of different Maya languages influence each other and lead to the reconstruction of aesthetic and cultural forms (in particular via global music genres).

Addressed to a local audience interested in linguistic diversity, with a high degree of (meta)sociolinguistic awareness –as is the case of Catalan society--, the unexpected perspective introduced by the two editions was

24 http://www.linguapax.org/archives/languages-and-the-spirit-of-the-word

25 Also invited to deliver the Gifford lectures (1988, University of Edinburgh).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (113)

113ALÍCIA FUENTES-CALLE

received with no little interest by the public. It contributed, it is to be hoped, an additional way of appreciating linguistic diversity.

This contribution has focused on one element latent in linguistic/communication diversity which is usually ignored from the perspective of mainstream academia and global policy-making, including international agendas on linguistic diversity. It is made visible by some cultural manifestations which channel alternative ways to experience language and express communication ethos besides information-centred ideologies. From a certain perspective, spiritual traditions can be seen as programmes to enhance, refine human communication potential concepts and experience. Spiritual practices as attempts to develop radical versions of communication. The spiritual perspective of communities needs not be underestimated in the understanding of communication cultures and ecologies – which are, after all, the context where languages emerge and live the way they do.

References

Blommaert, J. (2013). Ethnography, Superdiversity and Linguistic Landscapes: Chronicles of Complexity. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Blommaert, J. (2014). Lingua franca onset in a superdiverse neighbourhood: Oecumenical Dutch in Antwerp. Tilburg University: Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, No. 112.

Cha, Y.K. and Ham, S.-H. (2008). Language Education Policy and Management: The Impact of English on the School Curriculum. In The Handbook of Educational Linguistics. John Wiley and Sons DOI: 10.1002/9780470694138.ch22

Flubacher, M. and Del Percio, A. eds. (2017). Language, education and neoliberalism. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Glissant, E. (1995) Introduction à une poétique du divers. Paris: Gallimard.Hanks, W.F. (1990) Referential Practice: Language and Lived Space among

the Maya. Chicago, London: University of Chicago Press.Hanks, W.F. (2000) Copresence and Alterity in Maya Ritual Practice, in W.F.

Hanks (ed.), Intertexts. Writings and language, utterance and context.Rowman & Littelfield Publishers, Lanham, Boulder, New York, Oxford. [Originally published as Copresencia y alteridad en la práctica ritual Maya. In Manuel León Portilla, Miguel Gutierrez Estevez, Gary Gossen y Jorge Klor de Alva De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo, Siglo XXI de España eds, Madrid, 1993].

Hanks, W.F. (2006) Joint commitment and common ground in a ritual event, in N. J. Enfield and S. C. Levinson, Roots of Human Sociality. Culture, cognition and Interaction, Oxford: Berg, 299-328.

Hanks, W.F. (2017) The plurality of temporal reckoning among the Maya. Journal de la société des américanistes [online], Maya times. URL: http://

journals.openedition.org/jsa/15294; DOI: 10.4000/jsa.152944Khubchandani, L. (1989) Diglossia and Functional Heterogeneity. In Ammon, U. (ed.) Status and Function of Languages and Language Varieties (p.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (114)

114 LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION OBSERVED FROM SPIRITUAL...

596) DOI:10.1515/9783110860252.592 Knoblauch, H. and Kotthoff, H. (2001). Introduction. In Knoblauch, H. and

Kotthoff, H. (eds.) Verbal Art across Cultures: the aesthetics and proto-aesthetics of communication. Tübingen: Gunter Verlag, 8-10.

Kramsch, C. (1993). Context and culture in language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Lehmann, H.T. (2006). Postdramatic Theatre. London: Routledge.Nestle-Aland (1981; rev. ed. 1998). Greek-English New Testament. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung.Panikkar, R. (2007). Lo spirito della parola. Torino: Bollati Boringhieri.Panikkar, R. (2017). Fe, hermenèutica, paraula. Barcelona: Fragmenta.Pivot, B. (2014) (PhD Thesis) Revitalisation de langues postvernaculaires : le francoprovençal en Rhône-Alpes et le rama au Nicaragua. Université

Lyon 2 Robbins, J. (2001a). God is Nothing But Talk: Modernity, Language and Prayer in a Papua New Guinea Society. American Anthropologist 103(4), 901- 912.Robbins, J. (2001b). Ritual Communication and Linguistic Ideology: A Reading and Partial Reformulation of Rappaport’s Theory of Ritual. Current

Anthropology 42:5, 591-614. Sousa Santos, B. (2007). Beyond Abyssal Thinking: From Global Lines to

Ecologies of Knowledges. Review (Fernand Braudel Center) Vol. 30, No. 1, 45-89.

Steiner, G. (1989). Real Presences: Is There Anything in What We Say? London: Faber and Faber.

Tomasello, M. (2008). Origins of Human Communication. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Turkle, S. (2015) Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age, Penguin Press.

Van der Aa, J. & Blommaert, J. (2014). Michael Silverstein in conversation: Translatability and the uses of standardisation. Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies. Paper 121. Tilburg: Babylon.

Williams, R. (2014). The Edge of Words. London: Bloomsbury.Wooffitt, R. (2018). Poetic confluence and the public formulation of others’

private matters. Sociological Research Online, 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1177/1360780418778860

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (115)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (116)

LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

GOAL FOUR AND BEYOND

Carol Benson

Abstract: This paper argues that the best and perhaps the only road to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals, specifically Goal Four to “ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning” (UNESCO 2016), is to use learners’ own languages (L1s) for initial and continuing literacy and learning. L1-based education has parallels with heritage language education and language revitalization programs in empowering non-dominant community languages and the cultural values they represent.

Current practice in many low-income countries focuses on L1 use in the early grades while prioritizing one or more dominant languages. The research literature suggests that access, equity and empowerment of non-dominant groups comes with a more systematic approach that views the maintenance and development of non-dominant languages as a foundation for learning (Benson 2016). L1-based multilingual education (MLE) aims for oral and written proficiency in two or more languages while teaching and assessing the learning of curricular content using comprehensible bi- or multilingual methods. For Indigenous language, heritage language and/or revitalization programs, the pedagogical practices may be slightly different but the re-valorization of non-dominant languages as a basis for learning is similarly important (Benson & Elorza 2015).

In this paper I use case studies from low-income contexts such as Ethiopia and Cambodia to highlight innovative and theoretically sound MLE practices, as well as to discuss challenges inherent in the development of policy and practice. An integrated multilingual

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (117)

117CAROL BENSON

curriculum from the Spanish Basque Country also serves as an inspiration, allowing discussion of the parallels between L1-based MLE and heritage language revitalization programs. All aim to prepare learners for multilingualism and multiple literacies, which will improve access to and inclusion in schools and societies.

I conclude with a discussion of the directions MLE is leading us in educational development contexts, and a call for policies and practices that go beyond improving educational access and quality to empowering all learners with multiple language proficiencies for life.

Keywords: Multilingual Education (MLE), Empowerment, Non-dominant languages, Indigenous languages, Heritage languages, Multiple literacies.

LA LENGUA PROPIA DE LOS ALUMNOS COMO CLAVE PARA ALCANZAR EL OBJETIVO DE DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE CUATRO

Resumen: Este capítulo defiende que el mejor y quizás el único camino para lograr los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible de la ONU, específicamente, el Objetivo Cuarto para “garantizar una educación inclusiva, equitativa y de calidad y promover oportunidades de aprendizaje durante toda la vida para todos” (UNESCO, 2016) es utilizar la propia lengua de los alumnos (L1) para la alfabetización inicial y el aprendizaje continuo. La educación basada en la L1 tiene paralelismos con la educación en lenguas originarias y revitalización lingüística, en la medida que empodera las comunidades de lenguas no dominantes y los valores culturales que representan.

Es una práctica habitual de muchos países de renta baja focalizar el uso de la L1 en los niveles iniciales mientras que se priorizan una o más lenguas dominantes. Las investigaciones de referencia sugieren que el acceso, la equidad y el empoderamiento de los grupos no dominantes se produce abordando más sistemáticamente el mantenimiento y desarrollo de las lenguas no dominantes como base del aprendizaje (Benson, 2016) La educación multilingüe basada en la L1 (MLE) tiene por objetivo el dominio oral y escrito en dos o más lenguas al tiempo que se enseña y evalúa el aprendizaje de los contenidos curriculares utilizando métodos comprensivos/integrales bi-plurilingües. En el caso de las lenguas heredadas y/o programas de revitalización de lenguas originarias las prácticas pedagógicas pueden ser ligeramente diferentes, pero la revalorización de las lenguas no dominantes como base para el aprendizaje es igualmente importante (Benson & Elorza, 2015). En este capítulo, utilizo los estudios de casos relativos a contextos de renta baja como Etiopía y Camboya para subrayar la innovación y el valor teórico de las prácticas MLE, al tiempo que para discutir los

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (118)

118 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

retos implicados en el desarrollo de las políticas y de las prácticas. El currículo multilingüe integrado del País Vasco español sirve también de inspiración y permite la discusión de los paralelismos entre la MLE basada en la L1 y los programas de revitalización de lenguas originarias. Todos tienen por objetivo capacitar los alumnos como plurilingües y con literacidades múltiples, que mejorarán el acceso y la inclusión en las escuelas y en las sociedades.

Concluyo discutiendo las tendencias de la Educación Multilingüe que nos llevan en contextos de desarrollo educativo, y una demanda de políticas y prácticas que vayan más allá de mejorar el acceso y la calidad de la educación a empoderar a los estudiantes con competencias multilingües para la vida.

Palabras clave: Educación multilingüe (MLE), empoderamiento, lenguas indígenas, lenguas no dominantes, lenguas originarias, alfabetización múltiple.

Introduction

This paper argues that the best and perhaps the only road to achieving United Nations Sustainable Development Goal Four (SDG4), to “ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning” (UNESCO 2016), is to use learners’ home languages (L1s) for initial and continuing literacy and learning, as part of a multilingual approach that gives learners access to the additional languages they will need to navigate our multilingual world. The most efficient and effective way to address equity issues in multilingual contexts is to support policy that fully enables L1-based multilingual education to be put into practice.

Around the world, and particularly in low-income multilingual contexts, marginalized learners are disproportionately disadvantaged by intersecting factors like poverty, disease, remote rural lifestyle, gender biases and ethnic, racial, linguistic and religious discrimination. These learners are the most negatively impacted by school systems that are not designed to meet their communicative or cognitive needs. There does appear to be growing recognition of the need to promote policies that recognize learners’ L1s while teaching bi- or multilingually (see e.g. a study of language-related discourse in the Global Monitoring Reports, Benson & Wong 2015). Meanwhile, however, there is simultaneous under-resourcing and under-valuing of these policies—along with extraordinary attention paid to proficiency in high-status international languages—by the very education systems that purport to care about quality and equity. One has only to look at where education ministry officials are sending their own children to note the contradictions.

In such ambiguous contexts, donors are challenged to take a stand on investing in learners’ own languages as a foundation for learning and as a value in themselves rather than as merely a “bridge” to assimilation into dominant

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (119)

119CAROL BENSON

society (Heugh 2010). Meanwhile, the neoliberal forces of globalization allow space for the shameless international promotion of languages like English and French (Graddol 1997), for the preeminence of multinational publishing companies (Zell 2018), and for the exportation of certifying examinations like Cambridge (see critique in Phillipson 2001), all of which pressure communities and even entire countries to devalue national languages and ignore local ones (Rapatahana & Bunce 2012; Bunce et al. 2016). The pursuit of a high-status global language at all costs as “proregression” (Lysandrou and Lysandrou 2003), because while that pursuit may appear to promote material development, it comes at the cost of cultural and linguistic dispossession. I would add that the dispossession is for all learners, but the material development is only for the select few who manage to crack the code of a foreign medium of instruction.

The fact that language is not even mentioned in SDG4 may be a painful side effect of these contradictory forces, but that is no excuse. The same UNESCO that facilitated SDG development and monitors SDG progress is famous for having said years ago that it was “axiomatic” that the mother tongue was the best language for literacy and learning (UNESCO 1953). What happened? Meanwhile, out of all those countries, organizations and specialists involved in developing the SDGs, many of whom/which are highly multilingual, how is it that few or none thought that language of instruction was worth mentioning?

What seems to be lacking is critical consciousness when it comes to languages in educational development. Some years ago, Gogolin (2009) critiqued the attitudes pervading educational language policies and pedagogical approaches in Europe, even those that are purportedly bilingual, as having an underlying monolingual habitus. She was referring to Bourdieu’s (1991) theory of linguistic capital, where an unquestioned set of dispositions (or habitus) toward languages in society guides decisions about language choice that favor single dominant languages and tend to ignore or look down upon the multilingual, multicultural lifeways of many learners and their communities.

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the critical role of learners’ own languages in ensuring inclusive and quality education, to discuss progress in recognizing these languages as part of multilingual education (MLE), to outline research-based principles that should guide effective MLE implementation, and to highlight directions for future efforts.

Including non-dominant languages in multilingual education approaches

Part of problematizing a monolingual habitus in education and embracing a multilingual one is recognizing that the linguistic playing field is not level. For education to be made equitable, existing language ideologies must be challenged. This means challenging the assumption that a dominant language, defined as a language with high prestige and often official status in government and education (Benson & Kosonen 2012), is the only language

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (120)

120 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

worthy of being used as a medium of instruction. In today’s globalized world, where dominant languages exist at both national and supra-national levels, we might actually be witnessing the development a new habitus that allows for more than one language in education—but it is a dominant language habitus. This is the ideology underlying current education policy in low-income countries such as Mozambique, where Portuguese as the official language still dominates the curriculum, and where the study of English begins in grade 6; meanwhile, bilingual education based on some of the 41 languages proficiently spoken by school-aged children (Eberhard et al. 2019) is offered in certain regions as an option (INDE/MINED n/d).

Why would people’s home languages, the languages in which they are most proficient and/or the languages that best represent their values, beliefs, knowledge and traditions, not be considered important resources in education and other domains? To challenge a dominant language habitus, we need to examine the true worth of non-dominant languages (abbreviated as NDLs), defined as the languages or language varieties that are not typically considered the most prominent in terms of number, prestige or official use by the government and/or the education system (Kosonen 2010). First, for many people NDLs are their home languages, mother tongues or first languages (L1s) and the languages in which they are most proficient, making them essential for early literacy and learning, and arguably important throughout people’s lives. Next, for many other people NDLs are heritage languages, learned to varying degrees from the family or community but never fully developed due to insufficient input (Valdés 2000). Particularly where these languages have been weakened or lost through discrimination, prohibition or genocide, the strengthening of proficiency in them is important for speakers to regain a sense of identity and belonging. Another facet of NDLs, particularly Indigenous languages, to consider is that they encode ancient knowledge about life on earth that could possibly be the key to human survival (Skutnabb-Kangas et al. 2003). Whether NDLs are in need of revival or are widely and proficiently spoken by their communities, then, they are valuable for literacy, for learning, for identity and for survival.

Some recognition of the importance of NDLs is what links the practice of bi- or multilingual education (MLE) across a range of contexts, including low-income countries of the Global South as well as non-dominant linguistic communities all over the world. Policymakers and practitioners ask similar questions regarding how these languages are used in the school system, and to what degree. In the next section I review common practices, then discuss principles established in the research literature and what some countries are doing to advance MLE.

Research-based principles, common practices, and two interesting cases

L1-based bi- or multilingual education programs, or what we now call MLE, should involve the purposeful and systematic use of learners’ strongest

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (121)

121CAROL BENSON

languages for literacy and learning, accompanied by the explicit teaching of new languages, with the aim of creating learners that speak, read and write multiple languages (García 2009). Even if the term L1 is imprecise, as learners may have two or more home languages, the point is to use a language in which learners are as proficient as possible. The theoretical basis for present-day MLE comes from extensive international research confirming the now axiomatic Interdependence Hypothesis (Cummins 2009) which explains how language and literacy skills developed in the L1 transfer over time to new languages as they are learned, even if the languages are not linguistically related (Cenoz 2009) or do not use the same writing system (Kenner 2004). To maximize the potential of interlinguistic transfer, the L1 must be effectively developed orally and in writing, and there must be high-quality oral instruction in the new language (Bialystok 2007, Cummins 2009). Inherent in the concept of MLE is the teaching of non-linguistic curricular content in one or more languages depending on learners’ proficiency levels and prior exposure to related knowledge.

These principles should apply to learners in the Global South even if they were developed elsewhere. Extrapolating from longitudinal studies conducted in North America by Thomas and Collier (1997, 2002), which established that investment in L1 skills over five to seven years of schooling resulted in the best L2 skills, Heugh (2011) proposed that in low-resource environments offering learners less L2 exposure, even more investment in L1 skills would be needed. Of course, the amount of time may be less important than the quality of the MLE model and realistic teacher training including attention to the existing language proficiencies of teachers. Recent research suggests that access, equity and empowerment of non-dominant groups requires a systematic approach to maintaining and developing non- dominant languages in order to create the strongest foundation possible for literacy and learning (Benson 2016).

Unfortunately, current practice in many low-income countries does not capitalize on these research-based principles, which would strongly support the use of non-dominant languages in education. In many contexts, NDLs are used in the first two or three years of school, followed by a relatively abrupt “transition” to a dominant language as medium of instruction. The problem with adopting an early-exit transitional approach such as this is that it does not develop a strong foundation of literacy or learning in the L1, nor does it give learners enough time or input in the new language to effectively use it as an instructional medium (Baker 2011, Heugh 2011). Research does show that learners tend be happier, do better and participate more in early-exit bilingual programs than in non-bilingual ones, because they are eased into school and can gain basic phonemic awareness for beginning literacy, at least for alphabetic languages (Alidou & Brock-Utne 2011, Stone 2013, Walter & Benson 2012). However, it is rare for early-exit learners to score significantly better than their peers on standard examinations, for at least two reasons: one, assessments are typically done only in dominant languages, preventing early-exit learners from showing what they can do in their L1s; and two, learners have not had sufficient time to develop the L1 or L2 skills needed to

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (122)

122 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

promote cross-linguistic transfer (Bialystok 2007; Cummins 2009).

Scholars and practitioners working in low-income contexts have developed terms like L1- based MLE (Kosonen & Benson 2013), building on terms like mother tongue-based bilingual education (Alexander 2005, Heugh 2008)—also known as MTB-MLE in the Philippines (Metila et al. 2016)—or first language first (UNESCO 2005) to call attention to the need to use languages familiar to learners throughout primary education, and the fact that there may well be more than two languages involved. Some multilingual African countries have been using the term pédagogie convergente for approaches that value the mother tongue for bringing instruction closer to learners’ identities to achieve “functional bilingualism” in NDLs and French (Traoré 2001:6). Some multilingual Latin American countries use the term educación intercultural bilingüe or EIB for approaches that involve Indigenous L1s and Spanish as well as integrating Indigenous values and lifeways into the curriculum; according to López (2006), this is meant to support learning but also to empower learners to address the power differentials between the dominant culture and their own. Ideally, all of these approaches call for learners’ own languages to remain in the curriculum for as long as possible—but in reality, early-exit models prevail.

The case of Ethiopia is exemplary among low-income contexts for working to implement a 1994 education policy that calls for national (known as nationalities) languages as mediums of instruction for the full eight years of primary schooling. Because different regions were implementing L1-based education to different grade levels, our study (Heugh et al. 2012) was able to demonstrate that those studying in the L1 for the longest (in Afan Oromo, Somali and Tigrinya, among others) did best in the dominant language (English in this case) as well as in other subjects assessed nationally in the language of instruction. Our data also showed that switching to the dominant language earlier in primary schooling did not improve learners’ achievement in that language (Heugh et al. 2012). As a senior Ethiopian scholar succinctly puts it, “The view that education through mother tongue and political elevation of mother tongues is detrimental to the promotion of English is either mere linguistic chauvinism or linguistic self-denial founded on irrational theory about language, education and cognition” (Hussein 2010: 236). As his comment implies, there are serious challenges to effective use of the L1s. Despite the widely acknowledged benefits of L1-based primary education, and the fact that many present-day teachers are a product of it, the medium of instruction for secondary education, and the language of high-stakes examinations beyond primary level, is dominant language English, sending a wave of negative backwash that makes stakeholders question the L1 policy (Heugh et al. 2012).

The case of Cambodia is also instructive, mainly due to the government’s strong ownership of a program that began in 2002 as a community-based MLE pilot with development partners CARE International and UNICEF to improve education for Indigenous children, particularly girls. One of the most innovative parts of this program was training Indigenous people to be MLE

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (123)

123CAROL BENSON

teachers, and then creating paths for them to gain further training and be recognized as contract teachers or even fully qualified state teachers. Passing a series of education policies and Prakas (decrees), and now initiating its second five-year Multilingual Education National Action Plan, the Cambodian government has demonstrated its commitment to MLE as a key strategy for providing appropriate educational services to non-dominant ethnolinguistic groups in the highland provinces (Benson & Wong 2019). Five non-dominant languages–Brao, Bunong, Kavet, Kreung and Tampuen–are currently being used for literacy and instruction at the primary level, and others are awaiting official approval. Twelve graduates of MLE so far have gone on to become MLE teachers, which demonstrates that program longevity helps to create a critical mass of qualified teachers literate in their own languages as well as in Khmer, the dominant language (Benson & Wong 2019). The remaining challenges include creating a preservice training curriculum for MLE and approving a six-year MLE pilot, since the current early-exit approach has resulted in less than definitive assessment results, showing a slight advantage for MLE learners in mathematics and “no harm caused” in Khmer (Lee et al. 2015). Our own writing assessments in L1 and Khmer have exposed stakeholders to the skills that MLE learners have gained in their own languages that transfer to Khmer; I will discuss the need for L1 and bi-/multilingual assessments in greater detail below.

Contributions to MLE from regional and minority language experiences

Issues of educational quality, access and empowerment affect non-dominant linguistic communities worldwide, whether or not all community members are L1 speakers. For example, regional and minority communities of Europe may have better-resourced educational programs than NDL speakers in Ethiopia or Cambodia, yet they face similar challenges of developing MLE approaches that respond to educational needs, and must in addition prioritize the recovery and promotion of their original languages. For heritage language programs, the pedagogical practices may be slightly different, building on a range of language proficiency levels, but the re-valorization of NDLs as a foundation for learning is just as important.

In an article on empowering non-dominant languages and cultures through multilingual curriculum development (Benson & Elorza 2015), we describe multilingual curriculum development in the Spanish Basque Country as an inspiration for MLE that will promote a multilingual habitus in education worldwide. Following the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe, 2001), plurilingual competence is defined as an individual’s proficiency in multiple languages such that appropriate languages can be used as needed in each domain of life. The Council of Europe (2001) promotes multilingualism not simply as an educational goal but more broadly as facilitating democratic citizenship, pluralist attitudes, social coherence and mutual understanding. All of these values could be seen as underlying the SDGs, but how can they be linked to Goal 4? The Ikastola School Language

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (124)

124 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

Project demonstrates how the values-languages-education connection might work, and suggests that there is great potential in developing a multilingual habitus.

The School Language Project of the Basque-medium Ikastola network has developed a comprehensive framework for language planning involving four languages—Basque (NDL), Spanish (national DL), English (international DL) and French (neighboring DL)—beginning with the school curriculum and extending to all interactions in the school community. Their Integrated Language Curriculum (EHIK, 2009, Elorza & Muñoa, 2008) takes into consideration the sociolinguistic context and levels of usage of Euskara, the NDL, as well as how each of the four languages can be taught and learned appropriately throughout the curriculum. This means that the language proficiencies that the learner brings to school are nurtured while the learner is exposed to new languages, which addresses Cummins’ (2005:585) concern about the “squandering of personal, community, and national linguistic and intellectual resources” in the push for dominant languages. The approach uses the four languages to varying degrees and in different roles depending on learners’ prior exposure, linguistic proximity with learners’ strongest language(s), and learners’ cognitive levels (Elorza & Muñoa 2008:92). Consistent with language and literacy learning theories (e.g. Cummins 2009, Herdina & Jessner 2002), the approach promotes comparison and contrast and interaction between languages to facilitate cross-linguistic transfer (Benson & Elorza 2015).

Specifically, the Integrated Language Curriculum defines the main oral and written communication competencies of all four languages under a single Languages and Literature area, while each language has its own set of differentiated competencies and the expected levels of language proficiency are different for each (Elorza & Muñoa 2008). This is consistent with the idea that multilinguals’ language proficiencies develop and change as a reflection of the conditions in which they live (Herdina & Jessner 2002), and that a quality education program should give them a basic linguistic repertoire as well as metalinguistic awareness that will promote lifelong learning. In addition, the Basque Integrated Curriculum integrates interculturalism with multilingualism to accomplish two complementary aims: the creation of unity and the appreciation of diversity (Garagorri 2004). It should by now be clear how democratic and pluralistic values, social cohesion and mutual understanding can readily be linked to the teaching and learning of multilingualism, and that this could improve the quality of education worldwide.

Issues and directions in MLE

This discussion has thus far provided input regarding the important role of non-dominant languages and their potential to address SDG 4 through multilingual education. Meanwhile, it has exposed some of the issues encountered in the implementation of MLE, and there are others. A monolingual or dominant language habitus appears to underlie the failure of many policymakers to adopt an approach that maximizes learners’ NDL

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (125)

125CAROL BENSON

resources to build strong skills that can be transferred to additional languages. Assessment of learners only or mainly in a dominant language is another symptom of that habitus; failing to build on teachers’ existing proficiencies and place them in appropriate schools is another. The international promotion of dominant, former colonial languages continues. How can appropriate measures be taken in this environment?

Neville Alexander, one of the architects of South Africa’s policy of eleven official languages (see e.g. Alexander 1997), used to say, “If you are not following your own agenda, you are following someone else’s.” A self-professed language activist, he would have been at home with nationality language education specialists in Ethiopia, Indigenous community teachers in Cambodia or multilingual curriculum developers in the Basque Ikastolas. These are the people who should have been involved in developing the SDGs, but lacking that opportunity, theirs are the voices that should be heard as we work toward achieving the SDGs, because they can inspire us all to action.

Some actions have already been taken. Some of us scholars (Benson 2016, Kosonen 2017) have written background papers for the UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Reports suggesting how accurate and useful data on community languages can be collected and used to monitor educational quality. This has led to the addition of optional sub-indicator 4.5.2, “Percentage of students in primary education whose first or home language is the language of instruction” (UIS 2018:51), which unfortunately stops short of specifying how much space that language is given in the curriculum or whether teachers are trained and placed appropriately. Language of instruction indicators deserve to be more than “sub” and more than “optional,” but it is a start.

At the international policy level, there has been another small but encouraging step. A British Council policy document concludes that “introducing EMI [English as a medium of instruction] at primary level in low- or middle-income countries is not a policy decision or practice that should be supported” (Simpson 2017:11). The discussion actually refers to countries where learners are not L1 speakers of English, a fact that is more relevant to the policy than the country’s GDP, but again it is a start.

Other actions are being taken at local levels, and deserve to be shared. For example, in Senegal, where early-exit bilingual education has been piloted for years, an NGO known as Associates in Research and Education for Development (ARED) has since 2009 been implementing its own “simultaneous” bilingual approach in two widely spoken national languages, Wolof and Pulaar, along with French.1 The approach spans four years of primary schooling and allows parallel space in the curriculum each day for L1 literacy followed by French literacy, which builds on the L1 lesson, and for other curricular

1 http://ared-edu.org/index.php?option=com_sppagebuilder&view=page&i-d=71&Itemid=632&lan- g=fr-fr

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (126)

126 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

content to be taught or practiced in each language. The approach has gained widespread support due to the success of primary school graduates on a national examination, and ARED has gone further to pilot an extension of the model through grades 5 and 6 because stakeholders see that results can be even better. It appears that stakeholders’ felt needs correspond with scholars’ recommendations to maximize investment in NDLs.

There is another lesson learned from the ARED experience. Even in linguistically mixed communities, learners who are not L1 speakers of Wolof or Pulaar are reportedly doing just as well as their peers, and significantly better than those studying in traditional all-French classes (Personal communication with stakeholders, November 2018). Further, parents who are not L1 speakers of Wolof or Pulaar report feeling that the inclusion of those languages opens up spaces for their own. Rather than being divisive, as MLE is sometimes feared to be, this program appears to promote inclusion.

One issue mentioned above in the case of Ethiopia is the fact that high-stakes testing is rarely done in NDLs, which can have negative effects on MLE implementation. It is important to assess language and literacy skills as well as non-linguistic content in the L1 or bilingually, for the following reasons:

1. MLE usually spends the early years developing strong L1 skills that will transfer as the new language is learned, so assessing only the new language will not show everything that learners can do;

2. MLE relies heavily on L1 communication in the early years to teach academic content, and it is most valid to assess that content using the medium of instruction (or using both languages);

3. Assessments should reflect the aims of the multilingual curriculum, engaging learners’ entire linguistic repertoires (Cenoz & Gorter 2014).

To address the need for L1 literacy assessment in MLE programs, I have been piloting a self-expressive writing assessment in Cambodia that demonstrates the literacy skills learners have acquired and where they still need to learn orthographic conventions (Benson & Wong 2017 and forthcoming). Asking learners to write their own thoughts or experiences promotes self-expression and ensures that their written work is not simply copied from classroom print. Analysis of errors allows teachers to see what skills need to be taught or re-taught. Thus far the results have allowed a diagnosis of literacy development stages (by comparing writing samples from grades 2 and 3) and a comparison of MLE vs. non-MLE learners (by comparing complexity of sentences and ideas), and have positively influenced teachers to encourage self-expression and recognize that errors are part of the process of learning.

For assessing non-linguistic content like science, one possible format piloted in Cape Town, South Africa using ixiXhosa and English is a side-by-

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (127)

127CAROL BENSON

side assessment, where the same questions are written in both languages, one language on each side of the page, and learners can answer on either side (Plüddemann et al. 2004). As long as the answer is understandable, the learner is graded for the content of the answer, not for spelling or grammar.

A final issue to address is proper training and placement of teachers for effective MLE implementation. Qualified teachers from the same linguistic communities as learners are well positioned to MLE, but they may need training in L1 orthographic conventions and bilingual teaching methods (Benson 2016). In places where qualified L1-proficient teachers are not available, either existing teachers can be trained in learners’ L1s or more preferably, as in Cambodia, L1 speakers can be trained as teachers. Either way, the issue will become less acute after MLE learners graduate and go on to be teachers, as Cambodia is experiencing now. One important aspect that remains to be addressed in many contexts is how to account for teachers’ languages and literacy proficiencies in their employment dossiers so that they can be placed where those skills are needed. A multilingual habitus needs to pervade the education system, even influencing how personnel files are set up and managed.

Conclusion

In this paper I have argued that non-dominant languages play an essential role in addressing SDG 4, particularly as part of a multilingual educational approach that makes use of what we know about language and literacy learning. I have further argued that MLE has the potential to make education more empowering and inclusive, and to empowering learners not only with multiple language proficiencies but also with important societal values and intercultural understandings.

I believe that shedding a dominant language habitus and adopting a multilingual habitus in our thinking about educational development will lead us in productive directions with regard to MLE. The cases described here from a range of contexts give us glimpses of what is possible, and allow us to bring about what Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o (2012:8) has called a “reorganization of space…to bring about different results and different perspectives.” We can all be part of setting this multilingual agenda.

References

Alexander, N. (1997). Language policy and planning in the new South Africa. African Sociological Review / Revue Africaine de Sociologie 1:1, 82-92.Alexander, N. (2005). Multilingualism, cultural diversity and cyberspace: An

African perspective. Paper prepared for the thematic meeting organised by UNESCO in cooperation with the African Academy of Languages, the Government of Mali and the Agence Intergouvernementale de la Francophonie within the framework of the 2nd phase of the World

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (128)

128 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

Summit on the Information Society, held in Bamako, Mali, on 6-7 May 2005. http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CICI pdf/wsis_tunis_prep_multilingualism_alexander_neville_en.pdf

Alidou, H. & Brock-Utne, B. (2011) Teaching practices – teaching in a familiar language. In A. Ouane & C. Glanz (eds.), Optimising Learning, Education and Publishing in Africa: The Language Factor. A Review and Analysis of Theory and Practice in Mother-Tongue and Bilingual Education in Sub-Saharan Africa, 159-185. Hamburg: UNESCO/Tunis Belvédère: ADEA. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000212602

Baker, C. (2011). Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. 6th ed. Clevedon UK: Multilingual Matters.Benson, C. (2013). Adopting a multilingual habitus: What North and South

can learn from each other about the essential role of non-dominant languages in education. In D. Gorter, V. Zenotz & J. Cenoz (Eds.), Minority Languages and Multilingual Education: Bridging the Local and the Global (pp. 11-28). Heildelberg: Springer.

Benson, C. (2016). Addressing language of instruction issues in education: Recommendations for documenting progress. Background paper commissioned by UNESCO for the Global Education Monitoring Report

2016. Paris: UNESCO. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002455/245575E.pdf

Benson, C. (Forthcoming). L1-based multilingual education in the Asia and Pacific region and beyond: Where are we, and where do we need to go? In Kirkpatrick, Andy & Liddicoat, Tony (eds) The Routledge International Handbook of Language Education Policy in Asia. https:// www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-International-Hand-book-of-Language-Education-Policy- in-Asia/Kirkpatrick-Liddicoat/p/book/9781138955608

Benson, C. & Elorza, I. (2015). Multilingual education for all (MEFA): Empowering non- dominant languages and cultures through multilingual curriculum development. In D. Wyse, L. Hayward, & J. Zacher Pandya (eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment, 557-574. London: Sage.

Benson, C. & Kosonen, K. (2012). A critical comparison of language-in-education policy and practice in four Southeast Asian countries and Ethiopia. In K. Heugh & T. Skutnabb-Kangas (eds.), Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Centre, 111-137. New York: Routledge.

Benson, C. & Wong, K.M. (2015). Development discourse on language of instruction and literacy: Sound policy and Ubuntu or lip service? Reconsidering Development 4(1), 1-16.

Benson, C. & Wong, K.M. (2019). Effectiveness of policy development and implementation of L1-based multilingual education in Cambodia. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 22:2, 250-265. (Published online 2017.)

Bialystok, E. (2007). Cognitive effects of bilingualism: How linguistic experience

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (129)

129CAROL BENSON

leads to cognitive change. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 10:3, 210- 223.

Bourdieu, P. (1977). Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1991). Language and Symbolic Power. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Bunce, P.; Phillipson, R.; Rapatahana, V. & Tupas, R.

(eds.) (2016). Why English? Confronting the Hydra. Clevedon UK: Multilingual Matters.Cenoz, J. (2009). Towards Multilingual Education: Basque Educational

Research from an International Perspective. Clevedon UK: Multilingual Matters.Cenoz, J. & Gorter, D. (2014). Focus on multilingualism as an approach in

educational contexts. In A. Blackledge & A. Creese (eds.), Heteroglossia as Practice and Pedagogy, 239-254. Educational Linguistics 20. Medford MA: Springer.

Council of Europe (2001). Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. https://rm.coe.int/1680459f97

Cummins, J. (2005). A proposal for action: Strategies for recognizing heritage language competence as a learning resource within the mainstream classroom. Modern Language Journal 89: 585-592.

Cummins, J. (2009). Fundamental psycholinguistic and sociological principles underlying educational success for linguistic minority students. In T.

Skutnabb-Kangas, R. Phillipson, A. Mohanty & M. Panda (eds.), Social Justice Through Multilingual Education, 19–35. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Eberhard, D., Simons, G. & Fennig, C. (eds.) (2019). Ethnologue: Languages of the World. 22nd ed. Dallas: SIL International. http://www.ethnolo-

gue.comEHIK (2009). The Ikastola Language Project. Donostia Spain: Confederation

of Ikastolas of the Basque Country. https://www.ikastola.eus/sites/default/files/page/5167/file/The%20Ikastola%20Language%20Project.pdf

Elorza, I. & Muñoa, I. (2008). Promoting the minority language through integrated plurilingual language planning: The case of the Ikastolas. Language, Culture & Curriculum 21:1, 85–101.

Garagorri, X. (2004). Introduction. In EHIK, Basque Curriculum. Cultural itinerary, 12-42. Zamudio Spain: EHIK.

García, O. (2009). Bilingual Education in the 21st Century: A Global Perspective. West Sussex UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Gogolin, I. (2009). Linguistic habitus. In J. L. Mey (Ed.), Concise encyclopedia of pragmatics, 535–537. Oxford: Elsevier.Graddol, D. (1997). The Future of English? London: The British Council.Herdina, P. & Jessner, U. (2002). A Dynamic Model of Multilingualism:

Perspectives of Change in Psycholinguistics. Bristol UK: Multilingual Matters.

Heugh, K. (2008). Language policy and education in southern Africa. In S. May & N. Hornberger (eds.), Volume 1: Language Policy and Political

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (130)

130 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

Issues in Education. Encyclopedia of Language and Education, 355–367. New York: Springer.

Heugh, K. (2011). Theory and practice—Language education models in Africa: Research, design, decision-making and outcomes. In A. Ouane and C. Glanz (eds.), Optimising Learning, Education and Publishing in Africa: The Language Factor. A Review and Analysis of Theory and Practice in

Mother-Tongue and Bilingual Education in Sub-Saharan Africa, 105–156. Hamburg: UNESCO UIL/Tunis: ADEA. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000212602

Heugh, K., Benson, C., Bogale, B. & Gebre Yohannes, M. (2012). Implications for multilingual education: Student achievement in different models of education in Ethiopia. Chapter 10 (pp 239-262) in Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove & Heugh, Kathleen (eds) Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work From Periphery to Centre. London: Routledge.

Hovens, M. (2002). Bilingual education in West Africa: Does it work? International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 5:5, 249-266.

Hussein, J. (2010). English supremacy in Ethiopia—Autoethnographic reflections. In K. Heugh & T. Skutnabb-Kangas (eds.), Multilingual Education Works: From the Periphery to the Centre, 224-238. New Delhi: Orient BlackSwan.

Kenner, C. (2004). Living in simultaneous worlds: Difference and integration in bilingual script learning. International Journal of Bilingual Education

and Bilingualism 7:1, 43–61.Kosonen, K. (2010). Ethnolinguistic minorities and non-dominant languages in

mainland Southeast Asian language-in-education policies. In M. Geo-JaJa & S. Majhanovich (eds.), Education, Language, and Economics: Growing National and Global Dilemmas, 73-88. Rotterdam: Sense.

Kosonen, K. (2017). Paper commissioned for the 2017/8 Global Education Monitoring Report, Accountability in education: Meeting our commitments. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000259576

Kosonen, K. & Benson, C. (2013). Introduction. Inclusive teaching and learning through the use of non-dominant languages and cultures. In C. Benson & K. Kosonen (eds), Language Issues in Comparative Education: Inclusive teaching and learning in non-dominant languages and cultures, 1-16. Rotterdam: Sense.

Lee, S., Watt, R. & Frawley, J. (2015). Effectiveness of bilingual education in Cambodia: A longitudinal comparative case study of ethnic minority children in bilingual and monolingual schools. Compare: A Journal of

Comparative and International Education 45:4, 526–544.Lysandrou, P. & Lysandrou, Y. (2003). Global English and proregression:

Understanding English language spread in the contemporary era. Economy and Society 32:2, 207-233.

INDE/MINED (n/d) Plano Curricular do Ensino Básico: Objectivos, Política, Estrutura, Plano De Estudos e Estratégias de Implementação. Maputo:

INDE/MINED. http://www.mined.gov. mz/DN/DINEP/Documents/PCEB.pdf

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (131)

131CAROL BENSON

Metila, R., Pradilla, L. & Williams, A. (2016) The challenge of implementing mother tongue education in linguistically diverse contexts: The case of the Philippines. The Asia-Pacific Education Researcher 25:5-6,781-789.

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o. (2012). Globalectics: Theory and the Politics of Knowing. New York: Columbia University Press.Phillipson, R. (2001). English for globalisation or for the world’s people?

International Review of Education 47:3-4, 185-200.Plüddemann, P., Braam, D., October, M. & Wababa, Z. (2004). Dual-medium

and parallel- medium schooling in the Western Cape: From default to design. PRAESA Occasional Papers No. 17. Cape Town: PRAESA.

http://www.praesa.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Paper17.pdfRapatahana, V. & Bunce, P. (eds.) (2012). English Language as Hydra: Its

Impacts on Non- English Language Cultures. Clevedon UK: Multilingual Matters.Simpson, J. (2017). English language and medium of instruction in basic

education in low- and middle-income countries: a British Council perspective. London: British Council. https://englishagenda.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/attachments/pub_h106_elt_ position_paper_on_english_in_basic_education_in_low-_and_middle-income_countries_ final_web_v3.pdf

Skutnabb-Kangas, T., Maffi, L. & Harmon, D. (2003). Sharing a World of Difference. The Earth’s Linguistic, Cultural and biological diversity. Paris: UNESCO/WWF/Terralingua. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000132384

Stone, R. (2013). Effective activities to support teachers’ transition into the MTBMLE classroom in the Philippines. In C. Benson & K. Kosonen (eds), Language Issues in Comparative Education: Inclusive teaching and learning in non-dominant languages and cultures, 171-187. Rotter

dam: Sense.Thomas, W. & Collier, V. (Dec. 1997). School effectiveness for language

minority students. Washington DC: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education. http://www.thomasandcollier.com/assets/1997_thomas-collier97-1.pdf

Thomas, W. & Collier, V. (2002). A national study of school effectiveness for language minority students’ long-term academic achievement. Santa

Cruz CA: Center for Research on Education, Diversity and Excellence. http://www.thomasandcollier.com/assets/2002_thomas-and-co-

llier_2002-final-report.pdfUIS (Oct. 2018). Metadata for the global and thematic indicators for the

follow-up and review of SDG 4 and Education 2030. Montreal: UNESCO Institute of Statistics. http://uis.unesco.org/sites/default/

files/documents/metadata-global-thematic-indicators-sdg4-education2030-2017-en_1.pdf

UNESCO (1953). The Use of Vernacular Languages in Education. Report of the UNESCO Meeting of Specialists (1951). Monographs of Fundamental Education 3. Paris: UNESCO.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (132)

132 LEARNERS’ OWN LANGUAGES AS KEY TO ACHIEVING...

UNESCO (2003). Education in a Multilingual World. UNESCO Position Paper. Paris: UNESCO. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000002897

UNESCO (2005). First Language First: Community-Based Literacy Programmes for Minority Language Contexts in Asia. Bangkok: UNESCO Bangkok.

https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000140280 UNESCO (2016). Sustainable development goals. Paris: UNESCO. http://

en.unesco.org/ sdgsValdés, G. (2000). The teaching of heritage languages: An introduction for

Slavic-teaching professionals. In O. Kagan & B. Rifkin (eds.), The Learning and Teaching of Slavic Languages and Cultures, 375–403. Bloomington IL: Slavica.

Walter, S. & Benson, C. (2012). Language policy and medium of instruction in formal education. In B. Spolsky (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of

Language Policy, 278-300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Zell, H. (2018). Publishing in African Languages: A review of the literature.

African Research & Documentation 132. Birmingham UK: SCOLMA, The UK Libraries and Archives Group on Africa.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (133)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (134)

LAS LENGUAS ALÓCTONAS COMO FACTOR DE CONOCIMIENTO Y COHESIÓN

M. Carme Junyent

Resumen: Las grandes migraciones de las últimas décadas han tenido como una de sus consecuencias más visibles la creación de sociedades multilingües sin tradición histórica. Según las características de la sociedad receptora esta nueva diversidad puede tener efectos diferentes, desde la asimilación y/o negación de los valores culturales que aporta cada individuo hasta la creación de guetos impermeables al intercambio cultural, pasando por una gran diversidad de soluciones. En este capítulo se parte del principio que se incorporan mejor las personas que tienen claros sus vínculos con la sociedad de origen y se exploran las posibilidades de una relación creativa entre culturas diversas y también la función de las lenguas como elemento cohesionador y no como obstáculo para la comunicación.

Palabras clave: Lengua alóctona, migraciones, sociedades multilingües, incorporación social, asimilación, gueto.

ALLOCHTHONOUS LANGUAGES AS A FACTOR OF KNOWLEDGE AND COHESION

Abstract: One of the most visible consequences of the great migrations of the last decades has been the creation of multilingual societies which lack a historical tradition. Depending on the characteristics of the host society, this new diversity can have differing effects, from the assimilation and/or denial of the cultural values that each individual offers, to the creation of ghettoes that

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (135)

135M. CARME JUNYENT

are impermeable to cultural exchange, among a wide variety of solutions. This chapter starts from the assumption that people who clearly understand their links with the society of origin integrate better. The possibility of a creative relationship between different cultures is explored as well as the function of languages as a unifying factor and not as an obstacle to communication.

Keywords: Allochthonous language, Migrations, Multilingual societies, Social integration, Assimilation, Ghetto.

Introducción

Las grandes migraciones de las últimas décadas han tenido como una de sus consecuencias más visibles la creación de sociedades multilingües sin tradición histórica. Según las características de la sociedad receptora, esta nueva diversidad puede tener efectos diferentes, desde la asimilación y/o negación de los valores culturales que aporta cada individuo hasta la creación de guetos impermeables al intercambio cultural, pasando por una gran diversidad de soluciones. En este artículo se parte del principio de que se incorporan mejor las personas que tienen claros sus vínculos con la sociedad de origen y se exploran las posibilidades de una relación creativa entre culturas diversas y también la función de las lenguas como elemento cohesionador y no como obstáculo para la comunicación.

Si intentamos definir qué es una lengua, con toda seguridad incluiremos la comunicación en la definición. La lengua es un instrumento para la comunicación. Pero ¿es ése su único objetivo? Porque si es así, hay un hecho connatural a las lenguas que tiene difícil explicación: el cambio lingüístico. Es obvio que la lengua es un instrumento muy versátil que permite adaptarnos a todas las situaciones, pero, si su objetivo fundamental es la comunicación, ¿por qué le restamos eficacia diversificándolo?

La lingüística histórica intenta resolver esta paradoja y, aunque no tenga una respuesta definitiva, las hipótesis siempre contemplan la identificación. Desarrollamos un código más hom*ogéneo con los que convivimos y, a su vez, nos diferenciamos de los demás. Entre las explicaciones también puede haber la necesidad del intercambio: si todos tenemos las mismas necesidades, todos tenemos la misma incapacidad de satisfacerlas, por ello es necesaria la diversificación que nos permite la cooperación.

En cuanto a la comunicación, la historia de la humanidad muestra claramente que los grupos humanos se han comunicado siempre y para ello no ha sido necesario compartir un código lingüístico: a veces basta con aprovechar la inteligibilidad entre variedades, a veces se desarrolla un pidgin, otras se crean sistemas de adaptación y otras se recurre a una lengua franca. Los humanos han demostrado siempre una gran creatividad a la hora de comunicarse.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (136)

136 LAS LENGUAS ALÓCTONAS COMO FACTOR DE CONOCIMIENTO...

A pesar de estas evidencias —todas las lenguas cambian, la diversidad de lenguas no impide la comunicación—, la presión para lograr la hom*ogenización lingüística no cesa. Es evidente que una sociedad hom*ogeneizada es más fácilmente controlable y, a su vez, conforma un mercado más rentable. Pero precisamente por esos motivos deberíamos ser conscientes de la fuerza que proporciona la diversidad, de cómo convierte a los grupos humanos en más inclusivos y de cómo nos garantiza un espacio que no puede ser penetrado si no es en igualdad de condiciones.

Estas características de las lenguas y la comunicación deberían ser tenidas en cuenta en un momento en que las migraciones están alterando profundamente las relaciones lengua-territorio y llevando a la convivencia lenguas que históricamente no habían estado en contacto. ¿Cómo podemos convivir sin renunciar a la diversidad?

La primera condición para incorporar las lenguas de todos en la vida cotidiana es el reconocimiento. Por los motivos que sea, todos tenemos una tendencia a la ocultación o invisibilización de las lenguas no oficiales. Esta ocultación se hace evidente en muchos casos: si, por ejemplo, preguntamos cuántas lenguas se hablan en España, la respuesta más frecuente es que cuatro (euskera, gallego, catalán y español). Raramente se menciona el aranés (que también es oficial), el asturiano, el aragonés... y aún menos el árabe y el amazic de Ceuta y Melilla. Si nos hacemos la misma pregunta sobre Italia, la ocultación es aún mayor. Generalmente la respuesta es que allí se habla una sola lengua y, sin tener en cuenta las variedades del propio italiano, se ignoran el griego, el albanés, el friulano, el francés, el alemán, el catalán, el sardo, el esloveno y otras lenguas habladas en diversos enclaves. Si nuestra indagación se traslada a otros continentes, el resultado es aún más distorsionador, porque no solo ignoramos las lenguas no oficiales sino que solemos contar solo las lenguas coloniales (Latinoamérica, África francófona, etc.). Esta visión hom*ogeneizadora se ha trasladado a las lenguas de nuestros vecinos cuando éstos han llegado de lugares lejanos y, aunque tengamos personas que vienen de 100 países, por decir algo, el número de lenguas que les solemos atribuir siempre es inferior al de los estados de origen porque muchos comparten lengua oficial. Así, pues, la tarea imprescindible es el reconocimiento de las lenguas que aportan nuestros vecinos porque solo desde el reconocimiento podemos esperar la reciprocidad.

Una vez hemos reconocido las lenguas hay que plantearse qué tratamiento les damos. A veces, hay planteamientos de maximalismo ingenuo que no llevan a ningún sitio. No es realista plantearse, por ejemplo, utilizar todas estas lenguas en la enseñanza. Entre otras cosas porque esto es algo que ni siquiera se da en los lugares de origen: no hay materiales ni profesores preparados. Otras iniciativas más modestas pueden ser más eficaces a la hora de visibilizar la diversidad, aunque son necesariamente restrictivas: la traducción de folletos informativos, canciones, poemas, cuentos tradicionales, etc. Pero hay que ser conscientes de que estas iniciativas pueden reforzar la percepción oficialista de las lenguas. La propuesta reciente de la Generalitat de Catalunya de incorporar el chino y el árabe como lenguas extranjeras

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (137)

137M. CARME JUNYENT

en la enseñanza1 —junto a inglés, francés, alemán e italiano—, si no tiene continuidad con la incorporación de las lenguas reales de los alumnos no es más que el refuerzo de la lógica empresarial que valora las lenguas por su utilidad comercial y no por lo que aportan como elemento de vinculación con la comunidad de origen.

¿Cómo podemos incorporar estas lenguas en nuestra vida cotidiana? Si no queremos empezar la casa por el tejado, es imprescindible la formación de profesionales (maestros, mediadores, trabajadores sociales, personal médico, etc. etc.). En un proyecto de investigación del GELA2 comprobamos, por ejemplo, que la información sobre las lenguas de los alumnos que tenían los profesores dependía mucho más de la implicación personal que de la formación recibida. En un mismo centro, era posible encontrar un profesor de matemáticas que podía listar veinte lenguas habladas por los alumnos del centro y otro profesor de inglés que solo mencionaba «catalán, español y marroquí». En una encuesta interna promovida del Departament d’Ensenyament de la Generalitat de Catalunya a profesores de aulas de acogida, la información proporcionada sobre las lenguas de los alumnos en general era de calidad, pero en determinados centros aparecían lenguas como «patois», «dialecto chino» o «dialecto local», evidenciando, en este caso, que la formación —y/o sensibilidad— de los profesores de las aulas de acogida podía ser muy distinta y, en algunos casos, inapropiada para el tratamiento correcto de la diversidad. La formación, sin embargo, no es suficiente si no va unida al conocimiento. En un trabajo contrastivo del proyecto citado, profesores de diversos centros mencionaban el suahili como lengua de los alumnos. Teniendo en cuenta que, en el momento de la investigación, los hablantes de esa lengua en Catalunya eran muy escasos, una indagación posterior nos llevó a constatar que en los cursos de formación se mencionaba el suahili como una de las lenguas con más hablantes de África —lo cual es cierto— pero nadie había comprobado cuántos de esos hablantes habían llegado a Catalunya. Es como si, en un curso de formación en Estados Unidos, mencionan el ruso como una de las lenguas más importantes de Europa y atribuyen el ruso a los alumnos euskaldunes porque son europeos.

Es evidente que no podemos improvisar un conocimiento que no hemos cultivado tradicionalmente. Lo que sabemos de las lenguas del mundo es realmente muy poco y, aunque parezca paradójico, la aproximación a las lenguas de nuestros vecinos nos ofrece una oportunidad para cubrir esta carencia. Es decir, tenemos que plantearnos un aprendizaje por retroalimentación además de la investigación y la información. Un procedimiento que es extensivo a

1 El Conseller Josep Bargalló mencionó estas lenguas en la preentación del documento El model lingüístic del sistema educatiu de Catalunya http://ensenyament.gencat.cat/web/.content/home/departament/publicacions/monografies/model-linguistic/model-linguistic-Catalunya-CAT.pdf

2 “El rol de las lenguas de la inmigración en la escuela” FFI2009-09955, proyecto financiado per el Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (138)

138 LAS LENGUAS ALÓCTONAS COMO FACTOR DE CONOCIMIENTO...

las aulas. Para que este procedimiento funcione, hay que añadir un tercer elemento al reconocimiento de la diversidad ambiental y la incorporación de esas lenguas a nuestro entorno cotidiano: la superación de los prejuicios lingüísticos.

La cultura occidental está impregnada del sentimiento de superioridad que solo concibe una visión del mundo y esta percepción se traslada inevitablemente a las lenguas. No es solo la creencia de que hay lenguas mejores que otras —ésta es fácilmente combatible—, sino la ideología que presupone que hay lenguas más útiles que otras. Naturalmente, la pregunta más inmediata es ¿útiles para qué? Podemos invertir mucho tiempo y recursos en el aprendizaje del inglés, aunque solo lo usemos para ver series en la televisión y podemos escatimar esos mismos esfuerzos en aprender una lengua que va a constituir la estructura de todo nuestro aprendizaje posterior. E incluso, desde el punto de vista de la utilidad más práctica, puede ser más útil una lengua que pocos conocen que una lengua que conocen todos. Probablemente todos debemos replantearnos las redes de intercambio para poder calibrar la utilidad real de las lenguas, si es que éstas son mensurables en términos de utilidad. Pero la batalla contra los prejuicios lingüísticos también debe dirigirse contra un blanco que a menudo pasa desapercibido: los propios hablantes.

Es muy frecuente oír decir a muchas personas que su lengua —ya sea el bengalí, una de las lenguas con más hablantes del mundo, ya sea el mapudungun sin ningún tipo de reconocimiento oficial— es un dialecto. Y el término «dialecto» no es usado en su acepción técnica, es decir, la variación territorial de una lengua, sino como un tipo de sublengua que apenas merece ser usada en el ámbito familiar o local. Este sentimiento tan destructivo del vínculo con el lugar de origen tiene implicaciones que coartan la incorporación a nuevos grupos hablantes de lenguas subordinadas, porque si la propia lengua no es útil para la comunicación —es decir, para nada—, ¿por qué van a serlo las de los demás?

El GELA3 ha explorado la repercusión que ha tenido para algunas personas el efecto espejo del catalán. Partiendo de la equiparación de la dinámica de las lenguas en el propio país (lengua colonial/lengua local) con la de Catalunya (español/catalán), han experimentado un «descubrimiento» de la propia lengua que les ha llevado tanto al cultivo de esta —a veces incluso al aprendizaje de una lengua que no les había sido transmitida— como a la identificación con el catalán.

3 Junyent, M. C., Monrós, E., Fidalgo, M., Cortès-Colomé, M., Comellas, P. & Barrie-Ras, M. (2014) Canvi de representacions lingüístiques de parlants al·loglots per contacte amb la situació lingüística catalana. Recerca i Immigració III, Col·lecció Ciutadania i Immigració 6, Departa- ment de Benestar i Família, Generalitat de Catalunya, pp. 93-108

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (139)

139M. CARME JUNYENT

Hay quien cree que el refuerzo de las lenguas de origen promueve la creación de guetos y obstaculiza la recuperación de las lenguas locales. Si tenemos en cuenta las experiencias en otros países que nos han precedido como receptores de inmigración, no hay evidencia ni en un sentido ni en el otro, es decir, la asimilación no evita los guetos y, en cuanto a las lenguas, no se conocen casos en que el multilingüismo haya actuado en detrimento de ninguna lengua. Lo que sí se observa es que, cuando el objetivo es el «bilingüismo», la población que no tiene la lengua dominante como primera lengua se suma a ésta. Es decir, cuando planteamos la situación en términos de competición entre las lenguas locales, se reproduce la dinámica histórica de convergencia o adhesión a la lengua dominante.

Todos los estudios apuntan a las migraciones como un fenómeno creciente. Esta realidad nos impone un replanteamiento de la dinámica de las lenguas que tenga en cuenta los cambios en la relación territorial. La pregunta que debemos responder es si estamos dispuestos a que esta alteración consume definitivamente el proceso de hom*ogeneización lingüística mundial. Numerosos grupos humanos han demostrado que es posible preservar la diversidad. Y no solo la preservación, sino que cuando se mantiene la lengua, se preservan las posibilidades de crear sociedades más igualitarias. Tenemos la responsabilidad de replantearnos propuestas que pudieron funcionar en su momento pero que no sirven para situaciones nuevas, y para ello es imprescindible el reconocimiento de la diversidad, la incorporación de la diversidad en nuestra vida cotidiana y la lucha por la igualdad que pasa por la supresión de los prejuicios lingüísticos.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (140)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (141)

REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES, COMMUNITY RESPONSE AND

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Etienne Sadembouo & Gabriel D. Djomeni

Abstract: This essay aims at demonstration that minority African languages’ revitalisation process, which includes and involves the community that eventually responds positively to the different activities, leads to the sustainable development of the local people and their community in the first place and contribute to the advancement of the country and the whole African continent by and large. For this outcome to be perceivable, language revitalisation agents must settle within and work with the community. In an at- tempt to nail down what can be the relationship between language and community response, we investigate in which perspective language revitalisation contributes to the wellbeing of the community and vies for their sustainable development notably in multilingual communities where multilingualism is either perceived as a cur- se or an advantage. Taking into account the multilingual nature and dimension of a community, multilingualism can open doors to inclusive and equitable education. Driving from the BASAL and PROPELCA experiences and through the participatory approach, the total immersion of the revitalisation agent and participant observation, the paper unveils that when local communities are set as the first beneficiaries of revitalisation activities and when they are initially totally involved in the process and eventually own the project at the departure of the researcher from the field, they acquire new literacy skills, learn to protect and promote their linguistic and cultural heritage and change their communication philosophy notably within the framework of mother based multilingual education.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (142)

142 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

These skills are clearly destined to instantiate, propel and cater for community sustainable development.

Keywords: Language revitalisation, Community response, Immersion, Sustainable development, Fieldwork.

REVITALIZACIÓN DE LAS LENGUAS MINORITARIAS DE ÁFRICA, RESPUESTA COMUNITARIA Y DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

Resumen: Este ensayo pretende demostrar que el proceso de revitalización de las lenguas minoritarias africanas, que implican e integran a las comunidades y que eventualmente responden positivamente a diferentes actividades, conduce al desarrollo sostenible, en primer lugar, de las personas locales y de sus comunidades, y contribuye al avance de la nación/país y del continente africano en sentido más amplio. Para que este resultado se pueda percibir, los agentes de la revitalización lingüística tienen que instalarse dentro y trabajar con la comunidad. Para precisar cual puede ser la relación entre la lengua y la respuesta de la comunidad, investigamos como la revitalización de la lengua contribuye en el bienestar de la comunidad y tiene relación con su desarrollo sostenible, especialmente en las comunidades multilingües en donde el plurilingüismo puede ser percibido como maldición o como ventaja. Teniendo en cuenta la naturaleza multilingüe y la dimensión de una comunidad, el multilingüismo puede favorecer una educación inclusiva y equitativa. Partimos de la experiencia de los proyectos BASAL y PROPELCA que plantea el con un enfoque participativo y la inmersión total del agente responsable de la observación y revitalización lingüística (Djomeni: 2011, 2016). De este modo, el trabajo desvela que cuando las comunidades locales son el objeto y el primer beneficiario de las actividades de revitalización y cuando éstas se implican desde el inicio y de manera total en el proceso y eventualmente se apropian del proyecto del investigador de campo desde el principio, las comunidades logran nuevas destrezas de literacidad/ alfabetismo, aprenden a proteger y promover su patrimonio lingüístico y cultural y cambian su punto de vista filosófico, especialmente en el marco de la educación plurilingüe basada en la lengua materna. Estas destrezas están destinadas claramente a ejemplificar, impulsar y abastecer el desarrollo sostenible de la comunidad.

Palabras clave: Revitalización lingüística, respuesta comunitaria, inmersión, desarrollo sostenible, trabajo de campo.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (143)

143ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

Introduction

These recent years, language revitalisation has gradually grown to become an almost sub-component of the field of linguistics. In our opinion, language revitalisation, if embraced from a perspective of the total immersion of the researcher or agent in the community where the main activities are carried out, is to be perceived as to be in a mid-way between descriptive and applied linguistics. Therefore, s/he who engages in language revitalisation shall have a sound knowledge of descriptive and applied linguistics, notably descriptive grammar, language standardisation and literacy, language teaching and material development, mainly for unwritten/endangered languages. Because revitalisation is a process, which does never end, the focus in this paper is on the activities carried out by the researcher with community members, within the community and which eventually empower the local people. Such empowerment can only occur when the response of the community has been quite positive along the process. The essay is built on the assumption that the stronger community response, the higher the degree of ownership. This response is then expected to foster development and sustainable development as well. This assumption led to the following questions: what is community response and what is total immersion in language revitalisation? What can be the relationship between this language revitalisation as a process and sustainable development, notably in multilingual societies? In order to seek adequate answers to these interrogations, we convoked the total immersion approach based on participant observation driven from BASAL (Basic Standardisation of all unwritten African Languages) and PROPELCA (Programme opérationnel pour l’Enseignement des Langues au Cameroun) fieldwork experience and beyond. We build from BASAL, with main focus on the Bəmbələ community, speakers of a language with the same name, and PROPELCA classes organised in collaboration with the education authorities of Christian schools alongside parents and learners and most of the different language committees that were involved. They included: Lamnsoꞌ, Duala, Fe’efe’e, Ghɔmáláꞌ, Limbum, Ɓasaá, Kom, Bafut, Yemba, Nkwen-Mendankwen, Mundani, Mədʉmbɑ and Babungo language committees, (Tadadjeu et al., 2004, p.6-7). We shall rely on the language committees to show how community implication and positive response are required and are very useful in language revitalisation process. In the same time, to be able to systematically seek reliable answers to the questions, we have organised the content of the essay into six sections. The first section briefly establishes the methodology of the essay. The second section helps to shed light on the understanding of the concepts language revitalisation and sustainable development and the nexus that relates them. Section 3 sets out to clarify the notion of total immersion as applied to language revitalisation. In section 4, we unveil what we understand by community response. The fifth section addresses the impact of community response on sustainable development of the society while the last section, section six, explores some challenges that may be faced in the attempt to achieve the goals.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (144)

144 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

1. Methodological concerns

This study is essentially based on fieldwork experience and participant observation. In fact, the discussion relies on the participatory approach between the researcher and the community. Therefore, in working hand in hand with community members and within the community, this approach helped to gather all the materials necessary for our analysis. In this vein, primary and secondary relevant data for the study were collected within this perspective. Driving from BASAL (Basic Standardisation of All African Languages) and PROPELCA (Programme opérationnel pour l’Enseignement des Langues au Cameroun) fieldwork experience, this paper seeks to address the issues from within.

Furthermore, in this study, the concept of mother tongue shall be understood in two ways. I the first place, it shall be taken in its commonly known sense that is, as the first language the child acquires from birth to puberty. Secondly, it means the first language s/he was supposed to acquire but fail to because of failure of intergeneration language transmission or other social events: that is the native language of the child’s father or mother.

2. Understanding language revitalisation and sustainable development

This section sheds light on the main concepts that will constitute the backbone of our analysis. Therefore, we shall subsequently look at the concepts of language revitalisation and sustainable development in order to be able to capture the link between them in the context of this study.

2.1. Language revitalisation

Most recently, some scholars (Grenoble & Whaley, 1998) have gradually shifted their attention from mere language description and documentation to the useful application of the data collected in documentation activities to address real social-related problems. In fact, there has been a growing concern about how to make local communities the primary beneficiaries of fieldworks on their languages, notably in context of minority or endangered languages. Language documentation for the sake of documentation began then to be looked at by some language promoters and fieldworkers as totally aiming at the selfish or egoistic satisfaction of the researcher because its focus was not even language description. This was clearly pointed out by Himmermann (1998, p.166) in these terms: “The aim of language documentation is to provide a comprehensive record of the linguistic practices characteristic of a given speech community [...]. This [...] differs fundamentally from [...] language description [which] aims at the record of a language [...] as a system of abstract elements, constructions, and rules, documentary and descriptive linguistics”. The idea of language revitalisation came up as an attempt to provide an answer to the worry mentioned above. Language revitalisation, initially carried out without the implication of the local community, native-speakers of the language under revitalisation, also later on suffered some

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (145)

145ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

set back and criticisms. Some scholars (Djomeni, 2016 & 2017) claimed that by doing so, it was falling into the same trap like language documentation agents. Hence, the community approach was envisaged as a response to this criticism. This approach puts the community at the centre of all activities. It does so because it considers that language re- vitalisation is a long and never ended process, which must also be embraced and own by the communities themselves. Therefore, language revitalisation can be understood or looked at as a process, a set of activities vying for the protection, promotion and popularisation of a language, mainly a minority or an endangered language. Depending on its nature or rather level of development or not, language revitalisation may include documentation. In fact, in our opinion, nowadays, one cannot do vital revitalisation without documenting. Indeed, when revitalising an endangered language for instance, one has to take into account all the pre-standardisation activities (sociolinguistic survey, identification of the reference dialect, grammatical description of the dialect: phonology, morphology, syntax, etc.). This stage is followed by standardisation activities proper, which includes the designing of a writing system with the community, community literacy classes, and training of the local people for ownership. In Cameroon, a framework in which community members can meet to discuss the promotion of their language and culture for sustainability is known as “language committee”. Contrary to Malik (2000) who argues that if languages want to die, we should let them die in peace, we would not stand and look at any language dying while we are able to do something to save it and revive it. King (2001) quoted by Zepeda & Penfield (2008, p.13), concurs with this idea when he states that “Language revitalisation is the process moving towards renewed vitality for a threatened language”. It is also true that language revitalisation revalorise, revive a language and its use and usage while permitting and easing communication at all levels among native or/and non-native speakers. The case of BASAL activities on Bə mbələ , Gbete, Mada, Tuki, Bikele, Kwasio, Mfumte, Bambalang languages among others can be used as illustration in this vein (See Djomeni, 2009).

Revitalisation activities should be permanent to ensure inter-generational transfer and durability for sustainable development.

2.2 Understanding sustainable development in linguistic and cultural contexts

When we understand the concept ‘sustainable development’, we begin to question ourselves whether it bears a new and pragmatic meaning or it is simply another new concept created by development operators and institutions to sustain scholarly debates and distract the poor peoples. However, when we start probing it, we can posit that it might have come into use because the traditional conception of ‘development’ proved to possess some major shortcomings. In fact, development strategists argue that it failed to address and meet the challenges of the time. Again, this argument will lead people to think that development is a ‘self-driving’ concept. Simply put, it failed because of the inability of the human beings who coined it and who gave it a

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (146)

146 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

content, to attain the goals they set. If they were unable to attain those goals at that time, it is because the concept has undergone some modifications that they would today?

We have a feeling that a positive answer needs to be given for this question. If the ultimate goal of “sustainable development” is to reduce the rich-poor divide and to ensure that the coming generation’s interests are not jeopardised, we believe that the challenges could be met. In effect, sustainable development as an ‘attempt to meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the possibilities of the future generations to meet theirs’, focuses on peoples well-being, the amelioration of the living standards of the poor people. As such, if strategically and efficiently applied, it must help to foster change.

From this definition, we can establish that there is a link between local language developments, alternative education, mother tongue based multilingual education (MTB-MLE) and sustainable poverty alleviation. In developing nations in particular, development has not been reached because the largest majority of the population were discarded from decision taking due to the still ongoing discriminatory education system. Therefore, sustainable development should, at the level of each nation, lead to national development i.e., ‘nation’s human resources acting on its natural resources to produce goods (tangible and intangible) in order to improve the condition of the average citizen of the nation-state [While preserving the needs and interests of the coming generations] as noted by Chumbow (1990, 2005).

Sustainable development exhibits some principles such as protracting environment in the production of quality goods, participation and engagement of community members / citizens, responsibility and precaution concerning scientific risks and finally, subsidiarity with focus on the people at the grassroots. The notion and idea of involvement and participation developed are actually prominent in total immersion within language revitalisation context and are intrinsically taken into account in the pillars of sustainable development.

Initially, sustainable development pillars were limited to three components, notably economic, environmental and social., as time went by, the cultural pillar was involved. Yet, none of these pillars brought up the key role of linguistic diversity with focus on mother tongue based multilingual education in sustainable development. In her online course on ‘Le Concept de développement durable’. Duclau (2018) exposes that the economic pillar looks at the pursuit of economic growth and augmentation of goods and services. The social pillar strengthens social cohesion with focus on poverty alleviation and the equitable sharing of revenues. The cultural pillar favours the protection and promotion of cultural diversity and cultural rights. As for the environmental pillar, it aims at limiting the negative impact of human on natural environment in order to preserve it. As earlier mentioned, there is no indication of how the people at the grassroots shall participate in the process. Furthermore, how can these people even participate when there is no plan for inclusive education, i.e., an education that takes into account their

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (147)

147ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

languages, their native tongues? This question is very important in multilingual societies like Cameroon and many other African nations, where most people do not access education, and where they do, are excluded from ‘inclusive and equitable quality education’ as defined by UNESCO (2017, p.18). This exclusion is the consequence of colonial languages use, official languages and medium of instruction in most African countries. How can these people even participate when their languages are endangered or are not promoted? The questions will be progressively answered in this study. In order to revitalise the minority or endangered languages, language development agents must always opt for an approach, which encourages and nurtures community implication.

3. The total immersion approach for language revitalisation

Researchers and language revitalisation agents have developed and often opted for diverse approaches in their activities. In Cameroon, the total immersion of the researcher(s) has been adopted for efficient and community-based language revitalisation (mainly within the perspective of BASAL (Basic Standardisation of all Unwritten African languages, see Djomeni: 2011, 2016). In a community-centred language revitalisation programme, the total immersion approach aims at building the researcher’s language and cultural skills. This approach is built on the assumption that when the researcher or language revitalisation agent successfully builds a collaborative network together with the community where s/he settles, together, they obtain sustainable and outstanding results. In this case, the different activities carried out are beneficial to all participants: in the first place, the community, secondly, the researcher himself and eventually the scientific community. This is what Djomeni (op cit) called a three-dimensional outcome. The three dimensional of the benefits unfold as follows:

a.) to the community: empowerment, literacy in mother tongue, consciousness raising about linguistic and cultural heritage protection, promotion and marketing;

b.) the scientific community: production of scientific work, sharingof linguistic knowledge on the language, data archiving, etc;

c.) the individual researcher: writing of a dissertation (PhD., Masters, etc.) from fieldwork data, strengthening of fieldwork capabilities.

The BASAL researchers were young graduates in linguistics who accepted to spend three years within the native area of the language under revitalisation. This time spent in the field was to instigate the revalorisation of the language and change local people’s mind set about their mother tongue through a set of activities. These activities included: identification of the different dialects of the language, grammatical description of the language, alphabet and orthography design, literacy classes organisation, basic literacy material development, production of a lexicon, transitional manual, big books, etc., (for further information, see Djomeni, 2009).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (148)

148 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

In total immersion, the community is supposed to be at the centre of all activities and is set as its first beneficiary. In this context, the researcher is seen as an agent for change and development instigator in the community. Therefore, total immersion in language revitalisation requires from the fieldworker or researcher a well-sharpened strategy to convince community members for their adhesion (Djomeni, 2017). A strong adhesion of the local population, speakers of the language under revitalisation, paves ways to community literacy. The aim of such literacy is to promote and sustain the use of the local language in education. By so doing, it becomes a driving force behind the community contribution to encourage government in the implementation of an MTB-MLE. In fact, according to Chumbow (2011) and Orekan (2011), MTB-MLE has been demonstrated as the best and efficient way to address educational disadvantages in the developing world in general, in Africa (see) and Cameroon in particular.

The peculiarity of such an education approach and its advantages have also been demonstrated by many research programmes on the continent in general and in Cameroon in particular. Among them, we can cite the following: PROPELCA, BASAL and ERELA (Ecoles rurales électroniques en Langues africaines) programmes ran by NACALCO (National Association of Cameroonian Languages Committees) in Cameroon, IFE project in Nigeria (Fanfunwa, 1975), the Project for alternative education in South Africa (Neville, 2005 ). These projects were all conceived based on the premises that when children are first taught in their mother tongues, they develop extraordinary skills, enroot into their cultures and environment before any exposure to international or external world. The advantage of this type of education is that it provides the learners with social, linguistic, cultural and psychological stability and prepares them to respond to the challenges of their environment while caring about the needs of the future generation.

In MTB-MLE, learning contents are designed such that it cuts across health and social development: the population understand that the traditional health care system that has been neglected or castigated by the colonial system has to be revitalised in order to address some of the following:

a.) health challenges of their time and of the future generations;

b.) environmental challenges: The population should understand why and how their environment shall be protected in order to avoid some diseases spread via pollution, deforestation provoking climate change, soil degradation affecting food production, so that in the future, others can continue to benefit a healthy environment with its protected fauna and flora;

c.) social development with focus on peace nurturing, acceptance of differences for social cohesion, vocational education. Vocational education promotes in this case the use of L1 or mother tongue of the learners to facilitate knowledge acquisition and transmission and acquisition of technical skills.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (149)

149ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

These features respond and correspond to the pillars of sustainable development. In addition, research activities and experiments conducted by governments or private African institutions have concurred as earlier put that the MTB-MLE empowers the people at the grassroots. Some of these institutions include NACALCO in Cameroon, PRAESA (Project for the Study of Alternative Education in South Africa) and LANGTAG (Language Plan Task) in South Africa, AMALAN (Académie malienne des Langues) in Mali and ACALAN (Académie africaine des Langues) still in Bamako, Mali. This is eventually what total immersion intends to achieve through its literacy activities in the field. It aims at helping the community to embed basic literacy skills in its developmental process in order to bring up its catalytic and transformative potential. The model of literacy or education that total immersion vies to nurture and promote is essentially bi/ trilingual, with the mother tongue as its first component.

To illustrate the point mentioned above, we observed from our literacy classes that learners were/are able to count from 1 to 100 and beyond by the end of what can equal to their first cycle of Basic education (SIL/CP- Class 1 & 2), when they are taught in their mother tongues. This has been reinforced by the same observation during holidays (urban) literacy classes in mother tongues with Fe’efe’e learners. This is not possible when the children are taught in English or French because at this same level and where they are expected to count only from one to ten. The gap is very big and this shows how the mother tongue can shape and mould the brain, influence and build thinking and brainwork of mathematics to the learners at their early age of schooling.

At the social level, with MTB-MLE, the learner is not discarded from the natural /near natural environment s/he learns immediately from and that shapes his/her linguistic and cultural worldview and philosophy. By doing so, s/he acquires and builds self-esteem useful for the protection and promotion of his/her identity both within and outside of his community. At the same time, s/he is psychologically prepared to accept cultural differences. As such, PROPELCA was built in such a way as to nurture peaceful cohabitation among African tongues and the so-called official languages (English and French) inherited from colonisation.

The PROPELCA programme successfully increased the number of speakers of the local languages involved, trained adequate human resources, raise awareness on the role and importance of mother tongue-based education in the cognitive development of a child and the transformation of African continent, of local cultural heritage and identity as demonstrated by Gfeller (1996, p.48). It went beyond this to change policy makers’ view of local languages and to make them understand their impact in education. The programme demonstrated and confirmed that community involvement is a key factor in minority language revitalisation and development. In this respect, Tadadjeu, Sadembouo & Mba (2004, p.8) points out that Bəti (Ewondo) and Babungo languages were dropped out of the programme because of community response failure. Since we are discussing sustainable development in this

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (150)

150 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

paper, it might be worth noting that the outcome of the programme continues to be visible until today with the inclusion of Cameroon languages and cultures at all levels (primary, secondary, tertiary) though at a very slow pace in the education system.

For the total immersion to adequately respond the expectations of the stakeholders, the community must accept to be part of and to take good care of the revitalization activities. This has also been demonstrated in the promotion of local languages through education within PROPELCA according to (Tadadjeu, Sadembouo, & Mba (2004, p.13). In fact, they demonstrated that where community engagement was total, the outcome of PROPELCA was incredible while at the same time, it was not even advisable to delve into such activities where community reticence was observed from the onset.

4. Community involvement and ownership

Community response can be seen as the degree of reception and implication of the local people in the revitalization activities of their language. Local people here should be understood as the native speakers of the language being revitalised. Therefore, the main concern here is the how we do perceive and measure community involvement. In addition, we will look at how ownership can be assessed.

Community response can be initially assessed from the degree of implication of community members, native speakers. The more the number of local people who involve in the activities with the revitalisation agent, the brighter the results obtained. This involvement is essentially characterised by volunteering in the context described by the present paper. This latter could be understood here as the acceptance of being involved in some language revitalisation activities without expecting any pay. The involvement is supposed not to be conditioned by any pay, notably for the sake of community development. In addition, it requires that the community assists the researcher in the field at all levels (health, food, lodging, protection¬) when possible. This cannot always be exactly the case. Nonetheless, some basics needs to be covered. Participation in the literacy classes organised by the agent with the local people, part taking in consciousness raising campaigns (see Djomeni, 2017) are also indicators of community response. Volunteering also involves teaching and harnessing a literate environment. In this vein, the case of urban mother tongue-based literacy classes organised for children during holidays in Cameroon by some language committees is very relevant to be mentioned. In effect, in Cameroon, some well-structured language committees offer holiday classes for children in their mother tongues (MT) in order to allow city kids, teenagers and even some adults to reconnect with their cultural and linguistic realities. Literacy facilitators in this case, mostly work on volunteering basis while the production of teaching/ learning materials are at times sponsored by some elites ( the case of Nufi ‘Fe’efe’e language committee’, Ghɔmáláʼ and Dualá language committees are to be pointed out here). These urban holiday classes hold in big cities of the country like

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (151)

151ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

Douala, Yaoundé, etc. Tadadjeu, Sadembouo, & Mba (2004, p.14-15) concur with this when they state that within PROPELCA, community response was expected and perceivable in three main ways:

a.) via local language committees: consciousness raising;

b.) financial assistance for teacher’s training and teaching/learningmaterial production, fund raising from local collectivities, etc.;

c.) through administration: commitment of confessional and lay private schools to decision making concerning the teaching/learning of MT.

When the researcher is not a permanent settler within the community of the language s/he is reviving, when s/he is not a native of that community, s/he is expected to leave at the end of the timeframe s/he defined to accomplish his duty in the field. It is therefore assumed that while leaving the field, if the local participation is not effective and efficient enough, the project may simply collapse. On the contrary, if the researcher succeeds in embarking the community on the journey, as we have already mentioned, if s/he successfully involves community members, ownership is almost ensured. In this respect, in Cameroon, in such a context, notably as propounded and practiced within the BASAL programme, the researcher is called upon to set, together with the community, a local institution, which will henceforth be in charge of promoting the language from homeland to cities and elsewhere. This must be done through the teaching at the local levels of skill transfer techniques. Those who receive the skills become community-literacy agents in the local language.

Ownership shows that the community has effectively taken the responsibility to elaborate policies and implement them for the sake of everybody in the community. As stated by Chiatoh (2004), it shows that the communities have acquired high skills necessary for the promotion of literacy capacities and capabilities to manage the human, financial and material resources that will be raised or offered by the community-members. In this perspective, the community becomes the central actor for the promotion of literacy and local language and culture. This implies a pragmatic expression of commitment from the community for the achievement of self-language intergenerational promotion, literacy in the local language and sensitization of all community members, mainly parents on the importance and necessity of language intergenerational transfer. Hence, ownership is the clear expression of empowerment as a vital strategy consisting in acquiring competence in sensitive areas for the management of MT based literacy, taking into account technical aspects, schoolteachers, authors and writers’ training and even supervisors. When ownership is effective, elites and other influential local people can ensure the dynamism of their language through financial support, gifts in kind or nature, sustainable capacity building of literacy monitors and supervisors. All this goes in hand with the ensuring of an appropriate running of literacy activities within and outside the native area where the language is spoken, home and abroad. Furthermore, it takes into account the promotion,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (152)

152 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

protection and popularisation of the language through all media, especially digital hubs, the internet and the social media as well.

In sum, community response shall be visible and perceivable through the commitment of its members in various ways:

Financial contribution: The Ghɔmálá’ language committee today and Fe’efe’e (Nufi) one some years back and to some extent today, very often receive very often substantial financial contributions from elites for their various activities. They usually provide money to sustain literacy activities (training of literacy agents, provision of incentives and gifts to best learners, literacy material production). They also finance the organisation of public ceremonies to encourage, praise and celebrate those who attended the literacy classes. They do so by granting them attestations for participation. In the Ghɔmáláꞌ ꞌlinguistic community in particular, these years, a businessman who is also a parliamentarian, member of the community, contributes to the promotion of the language and its culture at very many levels: financial contribution to sustain holidays urban literacy classes, and the other related aspects mentioned above. Nufi has not been very active these recent past years like before. However, some local elites and some people in the diaspora are still working towards revitalising contribution practices for the promotion of their language and culture worldwide. The Fe’efe’e people are still conscious that they must keep the standard to protect and value the NOMA prize got by Nufi in 1985 (see Tchamda, (no data)) for their actions in the use of mother tongue-based literacy to positively transform the life and contribute to the wellbeing of the local people and the speakers of the language worldwide.

Technical contribution: Community members work on a voluntary basis with researchers/linguists to develop the teaching materials and train the trainers. They are most often very experienced mother-tongue teachers or facilitators who grant their time and expertise for free to assist in the promotion of their language and community. This is seen in the Fe’efe’e and Ghɔmáláꞌ communities. We also observed this attitude in the Bəmbələ community when we volunteered some years back. The local people were involved in the training, in the literacy classes for future leaders or trainers and in the elaboration of basic literacy materials with the researcher without expecting any pay or incentive. In some linguistic communities such as Fe’efe’e (Nufi), Ghɔmáláꞌ, Ɓasaá, Ngyɛmbɔɔŋ, etc., some people have been and are being trained in the local languages as community radio broadcasters. They are proud to do this to serve the promotion of their language and culture in order to shake people’s mind set.

This could be seen with the case of Mədʉmbα, Nufi (Fe’efe’e) and Ghɔmáláꞌ communities for instance with provision by elites or the whole collectivity, of finances, prizes and gifts to the language committee to sustain its activities. In the Fe’efe’e community in the past, this contribution was so well organized that each member of each association belonging to the linguistic area both home and abroad contributed some money called Copngweꞌ (literally aid of the people) for the sustenance of the language committee (Nufi) and its many cultural and linguistic activities.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (153)

153ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

Community radios such as radio Batcham , radio Fotouni, radio Mədʉmbα, in the West region, O dama FM in Nanga Eboko-Centre region, etc., with broadcast most of their programmes if not all of them in the local language are often managed by volunteer broadcasters. These radios are seen as tools for consciousness raising about health, education, agricultural practices because the people can easily capture what they convey in the local languages.

Finally, ownership can also lead to the creation of a community radio, especially for the promotion of the langue and its culture. Though we have already demonstrated so far how language revitalization as we perceive and promote caters for sustainable development, we think that it is still relevant to unveil the interconnectedness between the two concepts.

On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that the gender variable (Blumberg, & Clark, 1989) is very important in any social activity and development. This justifies why women have normally been given a very special role in social undertakings in most parts of Africa, contrary to what the western world has been trying to convey to the rest of the world about the matter. This explains why when women are deeply involved in language revitalisation like in any social activity it becomes very successful. They know how to build dynamism, commitment and sustainability: they are very successful in bringing people together.

Community involvement that includes traditional rulers, social leaders (elites), and ordinary members such as women, the youth, men and religious authorities in language revitalisation programmes, triggers a sort of development characterised by sustainability. In other words, when the community grasp through empowerment its development, the conscious and well-trained youth takes the most advantage of it and can easily channel the acquired knowledge and know-how through to the next generation.

At the end of a revitalisation programme, empowerment should have built participants’ self-esteem in such a way that they are capable of protecting and valorising their identity, accessing functional literacy in their mother tongue, designing and producing literacy materials for any kind of literature in order to be able to immediately transform their environment.

5. The impact of community response on the sustainable development of communities

UNESCO’s (2017) definition of ‘quality education’ considers the language of the learners as the first medium of instruction. By this, UNESCO tries to raise awareness on the necessity to promote and sustain MTB-MLE, notably in those multilingual contexts where the language of instruction has long and is even still been the language (s) of the former colonisers. The greatest majority of African countries face this situation. The use of those colonial languages has been proven as a serious hindrance to adequate knowledge acquisition, transmission and production. When people are forced to think in a language to which they are naturally and culturally disconnected, a language

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (154)

154 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

to which they are socio-culturally strangers, they tend to misuse or under use their intellectual capabilities, because they have to think and rethink before expressing themselves in the foreign languages, languages of their ‘oppressors”. This is obviously, why policy change cannot go without mind-set clean up or mentality change. In redefining the thinking paradigms of African leaders who received their powers and advice from the West and not from the people they govern, things might totally be shaken on the continent.

When the people receive an introverted education, an MTB-MLE, an inclusive equitable education, they are ready to respond the challenges of their time, because they are firstly deeply rooted into their culture before any exposure to the foreign or external world. Thus, they work with the ideals to satisfy their needs, while ensuring the protection of the coming generation. Quality education as aforementioned fosters sustainable literacy skills. These skills help the local people to be conscious of the preservation and promotion of their cultural and linguistic heritage. The acquisition of knowledge in the local languages has been proven to change the thinking paradigms in the community and develop self-esteem while nurturing prestige towards the languages. These attitudes help the speakers to change their communication strategies in the society and to rethink their worldview.

There is a general observation that the majority of Africans who live in rural areas together with some of those living in urban centres continue to solve their health related problems using African traditional medicine. It has also been observed that this health care means helps to cure some tropical diseases deemed incurable by the so-called western-driven conventional medicine.

MTB-MLE will help people to gain enough confidence and build self-esteem through awareness raising. This attitude will favour the revitalisation of the local African healthcare techniques, which has long been presented as a dangerous practice to human kind by the colonisers. The indelible stereotypes left on people continue to influence them negatively until today in some part of the continent, notably among those who received the western education and who eventually got disconnected. When the local people can value their language and their culture, they will be able to revive the traditional cost-effective, poverty-limited health care system. They will be able to consume natural bio-medical medicines that some Africans take almost every day on the continent and which does not contain most of the dangerous chemical substances found in manufactured medicines. Still within the logic of use of local knowledge to foster change, the world health organization (WHO, 2013) points out that in most African countries, there is one traditional healer for 500 persons against one conventional medical doctor for 400 000 in rural areas. They conclude that mostly in rural areas, the use of traditional medicine is still very common. In 2002, they indicated that more than 80% of third world countries have access to traditional medicine for treatment. This is why this practice has to be revitalised using traditional knowledge. Education in the local languages is seen as the main channel to distributing such knowledge.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (155)

155ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

If the local people are then healthy, they will be able to produce more food for cities. Food production will foster commercialisation of staple foods and cash crops. This will contribute to communities’ poverty alleviation through the enhancing of their living standards at all levels: societal life, education, health, economy and development will no more be a matter of discourse. The impact will affect and convince the youth who in their turn will be able to nurture the practice and transfer it to their offspring. This could also become a way out against internal and external illegal immigration.

In Africa where the solidarity ideals of the past are being fading out because of exposure to negative western habits that are blind-copied, reception of education in the local languages, MT of the peoples, is seen as a way out to revamp that solidarity. The togetherness and generosity that characterised the peaceful but today torn Africa because of the egoistic and egocentric attitudes of some of their leaders, could be preserved to reshape the living habits of the youth and that of the coming generation. If this traditional mode of government, which was centred on the ultimate well-being of the population is revived, future African leaders might be driven away from corruption, bribery, embezzlement and might be able to build a future generation of citizens’ minds that are normally fit and psychologically ready to manage public goods and finances. What we observed today from some African leaders could be traced back to the disconnected, the capitalist education kind of, they received. It can be looked at as the failure of the colonial education they received: an extraverted education, disconnected from the social realities of the learner, deviating from the principles of their societies. This then justifies why they do not, in their greatest majority, care about the transformation of the natural resources at their disposal for the good of their citizens. They rather seem to be preoccupied by the selling out of these resources to the former colonial powers that are still strongly negatively influencing governance in Africa for the individualistic and selfish interests of both parties (rulers and former colonisers).

By implementing equitable education systems in African countries, systems that include all the citizens, with their own languages as languages of instruction, they will be able to build sustainability in any intended social, national or community-based action. The de facto multilingualism of many African nations also requires a real implementation of multilingual education in communities. Therefore, the stakeholders must work for the protection and promotion of the African diversity at all levels, for now and for the coming generation.

This kind of education proposed to be offered by nations is then seen as the backbone for a solid foundation for a reliable sustainable development. It will influence the way people will think, behave, and act now and tomorrow on the continent. It will help nurture a new generation of Africans whose knowledge of their environment will be sound and who could use the knowledge to positively transform it with a protecting projection on the needs of those who are still to come. In this situation therefore, when the local people feel through inclusive education that their spiritual beliefs, skills and values, their

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (156)

156 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

cultural and traditional knowledge can serve as tools for development and sustainable development to be precise, they can nurture social happiness and positive psychological and emotional state of mind. This can actually contribute to their social wellbeing as underscores Shouka (2016). They easily understand what development is. They know how they can contribute for it to happen because they are empowered to do so. This attempt to transformation does not go without challenges.

6. Some challenges to face and overcome

There are always challenges to overcome when attempting to implement such language revitalisation and education policies for fostering change. The meeting of the objectives described above does not go without obstacles. There are many challenges that come up when one is involved in the revitalisation of minority or endangered languages and if not well-addressed might hinder the attainment of the set objectives, notably in multidialectal language contexts. We unfold some of the challenges below.

6.1. Community or public reticence

At times, when the community has not yet grasp the importance of the development of their language and the urgency to receive literacy training in that language, they may resist change. They may not want to collaborate or cooperate or they may refuse to get involved. Resistance could be expressed through the suspicious attitude of the community towards the researcher or the language revitalisation agent, notably when s/he is an ‘outsider’, somebody coming from outside their community. In fact, this is not new in fieldwork literature, because this has been called the ‘outsider phenomenon’ (Djomeni, 2011, 2016). Community and public reticence or resistance can also result from the way languages are planned in a country. By this token, if local languages do not seem to be given some prestige by their own speakers or are not used as the medium of instruction like the foreign languages in education and which are called ‘official languages’ in most African countries’, people may think that their own languages, as stereotyped by the colonisers, are valueless, useless or, they are still simple ‘patois’. Hence, extroverted language policies still adopted by developing nations can be considered as the major trigger to this resistance.

6.2. Disagreement about the standard dialect

In multidialectal language situations, because people are very much attached to their variant, they do not want to understand the reason why a dialect other than theirs should be the one chosen for the written form of the language. Dialectal differences, where it is not well-addressed, could lead to frustration. It could also favour the development of a negative attitude toward the standard variant, and can even become a source of conflict among community members. This is why the standardisation agent, the language

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (157)

157ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

revitalisation agent or the researcher must always, in such contexts, strategically build a technique to explain how language standardisation, wherever it occurs, requires the choice of a reference dialect that will be the base for the written form of the language. In Cameroon, this dialect chosen to represent the written form of the language is called ‘standard reference dialect’ (Sadembouo, 1980, 2001., Djomeni, 2011). The attachment, the prestige one has for his variant is what Chiatoh (2014) calls ‘dialectal loyalty’. This must be overcome in language development and revitalisation contexts.

6.3Lackorlimitoffinancialmeans

Communities can commit themselves in setting their language committee. Once settled, it often faces financial difficulties. This is so because it has not developed self-sustainable activities, those capable of generating financial resources. At times, their functioning depends on donations from elites. However, when these elites fail to sustain the language committee financially, its activities slow down or even stop. In order to address this issue in a permanent way, language committees are encouraged to develop activities that might help raise some money for self-sustenance and adequate autonomy.

This lack or insufficiency of financial means also limits follow up by specialists. Because the community or the language committee does not have enough financial resources to sustain their activities, they may not be able to hire a specialist for capacity building.

To the problems raised above, we can add the insufficiency of sponsorship from community leaders and elites. Furthermore, in most African countries, there are very limited law texts that instigate interest in the promotion of local languages as a key factor for social change. On the other hand, with the growth of the social media, another challenge today is not how to work for the presence of African languages in the cyberspace, but how to ensure that the standard form is maintained and consolidated by users on the different platforms where they interact. In effect, some users, though literate in their mother tongues, do not mind the standard form. Because they want to impress web or social media users, they discard from the standard. In this case, the social media are not used to consolidate the written or the standard form of the language. This becomes a challenge because the written forms of most African languages are still at their early stage and require stability. By this token, such actions are not for their good, and the uncontrollable space offered by the social media platforms are not used for their promotion.

Conclusion

This study whose prime focus was on how community-based language revitalisation process through total immersion can foster sustainable development has revealed a number of observations. As the analysis exhibits, when the researcher settles within a community and works with

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (158)

158 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

that community, the results obtained are outstanding. In the same time, with skill transfer and local implication, community response is very important in reaching the set goals. This response should be in a way to instigate sustainable development. In fact, when the first concern of language revitalisation is the wellbeing the community, local people end up acquiring knowledge capable of changing their worldview, their healthcare, their food production systems, etc. In short, the whole living standards of the community is positively impacted, with special care on the needs of the coming generation. This is possible only when literacy activities, carried out in the mother tongue of the people, has fostered MTB-MLE. This education has been proven to assist in nurturing a better environment for a better life. This can occur because the learners are deeply-rooted into their cultures and can transfer the skills to the future generation. By doing so, their change in communicational and philosophical paradigms, thanks to knowledge acquired from within, helps to raise awareness on the necessity to promote and transfer linguistic and cultural heritage. They also assist them to protect the local biodiversity with focus on the preservation of the rights of the future generation at all levels: economic, environmental, socio-cultural and linguistic, through a positive empowerment of current social actors. The approach adopted also assists in reclaiming diversity and strengthens the use of language to reinforce cultural and linguistic diversity. This has been proven very important, especially in multilingual and multicultural contexts. If people are taught the importance of their socio-cultural differences, these differences will be seen as a source of enrichment and social cohesion required for sustainable development to be. This view will be very significant in a gradually fractured world.

References

Blumberg, RL., Clark, MH. (1989). Making the case for the gender variable: Women and the wealth and well-being of Nations. In Technical reports in gender and development. United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

Chiatoh, B. Agha-ah. (2004). Assessing community response in a multilingual context: the case of Cameroon. (Ph.D. thesis), University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé.

Chiatoh B Agha-ah. (2014). Community language promotion in remote contexts: case study on Cameroon. International Journal of Multilingualism, 11:3, 320-333, DOI: 10.1080/14790718.2014.921178.

Chumbow B, Sammy. 2005. The language question and national development in Africa. In Mkandawire, Thandika (Ed.), African intellectuals: Rethinking politics, language, gender and development (pp.165-192). CODESRIA, Senegal.

Chumbow B, Sammy. (1990). The place of the mother tongue in the Nigerian, National policy in Education. In Emenanjo (Ed.), Multilingualism, Minority languages and language policy in Nigeria. Agbor, Nigeria: Central Books.

Djomeni, GD. (2017). The role of sensitisation in the success of community-

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (159)

159ETIENNE SADEMBOUO & GABRIEL D. DJOMENI

geared language revitalisation programme: an experience from BASAL programme in Cameroon. Entrepalavras: Revista de Linguistica do Departamento de Letras Vernaculas da UFC, 504-518.

Djomeni, GD. (2016). Total immersion as community-geared approach for an efficient revitalisation of endangered languages. In , Atindogbe, G &E. Fogwe.Chibaka (Eds.). Proceedings of the 7th World Congress of African Linguistics (pp 265-281). Buea, August 2012. Langaa RPCIG, Cameroon.

Djomeni, GD. (2011). From description to standard orthography and pedago gic grammar in the revitalisation process of endangered languages: the case of Bəmbələ . ( Ph.D. thesis), University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé.

Djomeni, GD. (2009). Standardisation de base des langues africaines (BASAL): partage de l’expérience d’un volontaire en milieu rural bəmbələ -Cameroun. In Mba, G; Sadembouo, E. Topics in language acquisition, multilingualism and culture (pp.61-82), AJAL (n°6), les éditions du CLA, Yaoundé,.

Duclau, C. (2018). Le concept de développement durable, in online MOOC/ CLOM, in Comprendre et analyser les enjeux et les actions du développement durable. https://mooc- francophone.com/, consulted March 2018.

Fanfunwa Babs, A. (1975). Education in the mother tongue: a Nigerian expe riment-the-six year (Yoruba medium) Primary education project at the University of Ife, Nigeria. West African Journal of Education, 19, (2), 213-227.

Gfeller, E. (1996). Un modèle africian d’éducation multilingue: le trilinguisme extensive.TRANEL (Travaux neuchâtelois de linguistique). (n°26), 43-57.

Grenoble, LA., Whaley L (Eds). (1998). Endangered Languages: Language Loss and Community Response. London: Cambridge University Press.

Himmelmann, NP. (1998). Documentary and descriptive linguistics. Linguistics (36), 161-195.

King K. A. (2001). Language Revitalization: Processes and Prospects. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Malik, K. (2000). Let them die in peace. http://www.kenanmalik.com/essays/

die, accessed on July 20, 2018.Neville, A. 2005. Language, class and power in post-apartheid South Africa

(ms). Harold Memorial Trust Open dialogue event. T.H Barry Lecture Theatre, Cape Town.

Orekan, George. (2011). Mother tongue medium as an efficient way of cha llenging educational disadvantages in Africa: The case of Nigeria. Scottish languages Review, (23), 27-38.

Organisation mondiale pour la Santé (OMS). (2013). Stratégie pour la médecine traditionnelle 2014-2023. Bibliothèque OMS.

Organisation mondiale pour la Santé (OMS). (2002). Stratégie pour la médecine traditionnelle pour 2002-2005. Bibliothèque OMS.

Sadembouo, E. (1980). Critères d’identification du dialecte de référence standard, (thèse de Doctorat de 3e cycle). Université de Yaoundé,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (160)

160 REVITALISATION OF AFRICAN MINORITY LANGUAGES...

Yaoundé.Sadembouo, E. (2001). De l’intercompréhension à la standardisation : le cas

des langues camerounaises, (thèse de Doctorat d’Etat), Université de Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé.

Shouka, VB. (2016). Intersection: indigenous language, health and wellness first people’s cultural council deliverable for FNIS UBC. Practicum.Health and Wellbeing. (Unpublished)

Tadadjeu, M., Sadembouo, E., Mba, G. (2004). Pédagogie des langues maternelles camerounaises. PROPELCA (n°144-01), les éditions du CLA, Yaoundé.

Tchamda, FM. (no date). Qu’est-ce que Nufi? Direction générale des activités Nufi, Bafang.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). (2017). A guide for ensuring inclusive and equitable education. Place de Fontenoy, Paris. http://www.unesco.org/open-access/terms-use-ccbysa-en.

Zepeda, O., & Penfield, S. (2008). Grant writing for indigenous languages.Arizona Board of Regents, The University of Arizona.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (161)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (162)

LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA Y CULTURAL

José Antonio Flores Farfán

Resumen: En esta contribución abordaré diversos problemas asociados al desplazamiento de las lenguas y culturas indígenas, enfatizando cómo éste puede revertirse, en particular a través de las artes y los medios digitales. Para este propósito, revisaré someramente sendas experiencias que a lo largo de más de dos décadas hemos desarrollado, sobre todo a partir de una investigación colaborativa centrada en la documentación activa o activista, entendida como investigación orientada al desarrollo de buenas prácticas de revitalización lingüística y cultural en comunidades y regiones originarias. Con estos insumos, el proyecto ha generado conocimiento básico en el sentido de su pertinencia y pertenencia para producir materiales y estrategias educativas que retoman diversas epistemologías indígenas como el arte verbal o las canciones en lenguas ancestrales (en relación sinérgica con los soportes digitales). Estas estrategias pugnan por el fortalecimiento y la promoción de la lectoescritura y la expresión oral en lenguas originarias. El proyecto se ha desarrollado de forma colaborativa con grupos de investigadores, activistas, artistas y educadores, sobre todo, aunque no exclusivamente en diversas regiones de la República Mexicana (entre otras, maya de la Península de Yucatán, náhuatl de distintas regiones y mixteca de Oaxaca y Guerrero, huave de Oaxaca, y hñahñu de Hidalgo, y en otros de nichos de oportunidad ---lenguas yumanas, como el pai pai--- y otras lenguas de Norteamérica -e.g. kikapú, ojibwe).

Palabras clave: Sociolingüística aplicada, lingüística educativa,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (163)

163JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

revitalización de lenguas, lenguas amenazadas, lenguas mexicanas, arte, México.

Abstract: In this contribution I will address various problems associated with the displacement of indigenous languages and cultures, emphasizing how language shift can be reversed in various ways, particularly through the arts and digital media. For this purpose, I will briefly review selected experiences developed over more than two decades, especially from a collaborative research labeled active or activist documentation, understood as research oriented to the development of good practices of linguistic and cultural revitalization in indigenous regions in Mexico. With these inputs, the project has generated basic knowledge to produce materials and educational strategies that recover indigenous epistemologies such as verbal art or songs in ancestral languages (in synergistic relationship with digital media). Such strategies look to strengthening the promotion of literacy and oral expression in native languages. The project has been developed in a collaborative way with groups of researchers, activists, artists and educators, especially, although not exclusively, in different Mexican regions (among others, Mayan from the Yucatan Peninsula, Nahuatl from different regions and Mixtec from Oaxaca and Guerrero, huave of Oaxaca, and hñahñu from Hidalgo, and others --- Yuman languages, such as Pai Pai --- and other North American languages -e.g. Kikapoo, Ojibwe).

Keywords: Applied sociolinguistics, Educational linguistics, Revitalization of languages, Threatened languages, Mexican languages, Art, Mexico.

Introducción

Este proyecto aborda el problema del desplazamiento de las lenguas y culturas indígenas, a partir de una investigación colaborativa centrada en la documentación, sistematización y análisis de las artes indígenas contemporáneas en su entorno sociocultural y el papel que ocupan en las estrategias de revitalización en comunidades y regiones originarias. Con estos insumos, el proyecto propone desarrollar conocimiento útil, en la forma de materiales y estrategias educativas que retomen géneros verbales proclives en lenguas amenazadas, como estrategias para el fortalecimiento de la lectoescritura y la expresión oral en lenguas originarias. El trabajo se desarrolla con un enfoque colaborativo propio con grupos de artistas y educadores en diversas regiones indígenas de la República Mexicana (entre otras, maya de la Península de Yucatán, náhuatl de distintas regiones y mixteca de Oaxaca y Guerrero, huave de Oaxaca, y hñahñu de Hidalgo, yaqui de Sonora, y dependiendo de los nichos de oportunidad, también con lenguas yumanas, como el pai pai y cucapá).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (164)

164 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

Con el concurso de entidades como Linguapax,1 todo esto se lleva a cabo en el Acervo Digital de Lenguas Indígenas2 donde se acopian, resguardan, preservan, y, sobre todo, desarrollan materiales en lenguas originarias con el fin de conformar un corpus revitalizador de las lenguas mexicanas que permita tanto mantener como sustentar el gran legado lingüístico mexicano y otros relacionados de distintas maneras; por ejemplo, lingüística o geográficamente. A lo largo de casi 4 décadas, a la fecha se han producido y están produciendo materiales en formatos multimedia, incluidos impresos, en alrededor de 20 lenguas y sus variantes; entre otras, el náhuatl, maya yucateco, tzeltal, tzotzil, chuj, ch’ol, hñahñu (otomí), ikoots (huave), cmiique iitom (seri), zapoteco, kickapoo, wirarika (huichol), ayuuk (mixe), ñu savi (mixteco), pai pai, etc. También se han trabajado materiales en español mexicano que enaltecen las lenguas y culturas mexicanas (entre otros, las Machincuepas del Tlacuache (véase https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drzu0eT8wUk ).3

Nuestra preocupación central estriba en cómo vincular la investigación lingüística llamada “básica”4 sobre las lenguas y culturas mexicanas para la producción de materiales didácticos en lenguas originarias con pertinencia y pertenencia cultural y lingüística, y hacerla de utilidad educativa para las comunidades hablantes, con su concurso directo, en un proceso de empoderamiento activo de hablantes, concebidos como sujetos activos y autores principales de los propios materiales.

Desde el enfoque asumido, dentro de la literatura de las áreas referidas, se considera desarrollar la investigación como un insumo para el fortalecimiento de las lenguas y culturas minorizadas y sus hablantes (e.g. Hornberger, 2014). Hablando de reversión del desplazamiento lingüístico (Fishman, 1991), revitalización lingüística, política y planeación lingüísticas, en particular del desarrollo del corpus, entre otras denominaciones que capturan el tipo de trabajo desarrollado. Se implica un enfoque interdisciplinario en el que confluyen diversas ciencias como la antropología educativa y la antropología comprometida o dialógica, con enfoques y metodologías co-

1 http://www.linguapax.org/catala 2 http://lenguasindigenas.mx 3 Para la versión impresa, véase: https://books.google.com.mx/books?id=iofH-6jQqI-0C&printsec=frontcover&dq=josé+antonio+flores+farfán&hl=es-419&sa=X&-ved=0ahUKEwirmovXya_eAhUG0awKHeu8Cm0Q6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=josé%20antonio%20flores%20farfán&f=false 4 La división entre ciencias “básicas” y “aplicadas” en ocasiones trasuda ideologías de superioridad vinculadas a la “verdadera” ciencia, donde desde luego el conocimiento “básico” es primigenio mientras que el aplicado es su sucedáneo, y de una importancia menor, de acuerdo con el subtexto. Estas dicotomías deben ser superadas y cuestionadas, pero no puedo ocuparme de ello aquí. Baste decir que concibo la investigación como un ejercicio que siempre tiene implicaciones “prácticas” y desde luego políticas y de poder.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (165)

165JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

participativas. En este sentido, el proyecto persigue ahondar en el desarrollo de una documentación lingüística que tenga la revitalización como su prioridad, o lo que hemos llamado activismo documental o documentación activa (Flores Farfán y Ramallo, 2010). En contraposición, la documentación convencional, o recibida, el paradigma predominante de la lingüística de campo con lenguas amenazadas a finales del siglo XX y principios del XXI, supone una ideología pasiva ante los fenómenos de desplazamiento, tanto de sus propios actores, como de sus principales protagonistas, abrumadoramente lingüistas y antropólogos. Semejante ideología tiene como efecto el considerar el trabajo documental como una labor de cara al futuro para la “preservación” del legado lingüístico del planeta, poniendo a disposición de futuras generaciones sus registros, en caso de que alguna comunidad quiera recuperar su lengua, de suyo irónicamente abonando a la sustitución. Hasta donde puedo ver, existen muy pocas excepciones en que este planteamiento haya funcionado en casos específicos, como el que reporta Tsunoda (comunicación personal) para Australia. En general, semejante postura, por lo menos indirecta e incluso inconscientemente, reproduce un esquema excluyente, que raya en el clasismo y el racismo (cf. Kroskrity, 2013). A diferencia de esta línea neoliberal de trabajo, de corte asimismo neocolonial, nuestro enfoque busca producir saberes de frontera, entendidos como insumos de conocimiento fundamentales que desbordan a la academia misma, de manera que se produzcan procesos en los que inciden los propios actores hablantes, en beneficio de la sociedad, concretamente en la valorización del multilingüismo en la forma de materiales de utilidad para la revitalización, mantenimiento y desarrollo lingüístico y cultural (cf. e.g. Flores Farfán, 2002). Más aún, el enfoque de documentación activa o activismo documental aludido concibe la “documentación” como un proceso creativo, generando documentos que abonan a la recreación del legado lingüístico amenazado; como ejemplo, considérese el desarrollo del libro Tsintsinkiriantenpitskontsin, Trabalenguas nahuas, inspirado en un material recopilado y desarrollado por el autor de estas líneas y que detallaré en su oportunidad más adelante al hablar brevemente de los materiales mismos.5

El proyecto restituye materiales directamente a las comunidades a través de talleres en los que se incentiva su uso en el ámbito comunitario, sobre todo a través de talleres para niños, para quienes están pensados y dirigidos, de manera lúdica, interactiva y gratuita con la participación directa de creadores originarios. Se trata asimismo de producir materiales de alta calidad, que dignifiquen las lenguas y culturas desde luego, al igual que el trabajo de sus creadores, quienes más allá de ser remunerados justamente por su trabajo, además lo ven publicado y lo reciben directamente para su distribución en las comunidades de origen.

5 Véase https://books.google.com.mx/books?id=9G5zRC6EExUC&pg=PA1999&dq=trabalenguas+nahuas&hl=es-419&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi4hdugyKfeAhUorVQKHfzbD5QQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=trabalenguas%20nahuas&f=false

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (166)

166 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

Foto 1. Colaboradora Laura Montesi haciendo entrega de materiales didácticos en lengua ikoojts (2017)

Estos autores, verdaderos activistas de sus lenguas y culturas, han creado grupos de acción a favor de y en las comunidades mismas que como parte de nuestro trabajo buscamos identificar, acompañar e incentivar. En el momento actual (2018) se están trabajando alrededor de 30 propuestas de material en lenguas originarias mexicanas, incluyendo música en nuevos géneros emergentes (por ejemplo, rap en maya yucateco, con ADN maya, encabezado por Pat Boy)6. Pero antes de describir con un poco más de detalle algunos de estos esfuerzos, detallemos algunos elementos de orden teórico, metodológico y de intervención educativa del proyecto.

Contextos, premisas teóricas, metodológicas y dinámicas de acción del ADLI

En el debate interdisciplinario en torno a la investigación-acción orientada a la reversión del desplazamiento lingüístico y cultural, se discuten cuáles son las mejores estrategias para el empoderamiento de las lenguas y culturas amenazadas, ya sea trabajando vía la escuela como instancia de socialización secundaria, o bien enfocando los esfuerzos mas allá de la misma, concretamente en el ámbito de la socialización primaria, es decir, la familia (cf. Fishman, 1991). Desde nuestro punto de vista ambas esferas de la socialización resultan fundamentales. Con todo, los ámbitos de intervención (re)vitalizadora dependerán mucho de cada contexto específico; no es lo

6 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?playnext=1&list=PLNOnkxkH2gxF-0QRT80MAGfig2did3Zbkd&feature=gws_kp_artist

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (167)

167JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

mismo una situación en que la lengua ha sido prácticamente desplazada a causa del etnocidio, en el que la escuela es casi el único bastión posible de recuperación, y que en la época contemporánea en semejantes contextos se ve como una deuda histórica de los estados nacionales que debe restituir sus lenguas a las comunidades de origen, a una lengua que ha sobrevivido en importantes ámbitos comunitarios, con considerable vitalidad (relativa), e incluso cuando ésta se encuentre recluida a la unidad doméstica. A manera de ejemplo considérese la diferencia entre las dos penínsulas mexicanas y su situación sociolingüística. La Península de Yucatán, es hogar de una de las lenguas más célebres de la República Mexicana, la maya yucateca, con alrededor de un millón de hablantes, con distintos grados de vitalidad, aunque, como todas las lenguas originarias mexicanas, amenazada. Se trata de una lengua con una relativa uniformidad dialectal, lo que abona a una fuerte conciencia de unidad de la conciencia lingüística, con cierto prestigio incluso entre las élites no indígenas, con un corpus importante en términos de publicaciones en la lengua misma, una academia de la lengua maya con un proceso de normalización por lo menos ortográfico, etc. En contraste, la Península de Baja California, hogar de las lenguas yumanas, que también pueblan el territorio californiano en los EEUU, prácticamente no cuenta con ninguna de estas características. Son lenguas que se encuentran en un estado muy avanzado de pérdida, con últimos hablantes de lenguas como el kiliwa, el cucapá, el pai pai y el kumiay, con poca o nula visibilidad entre la sociedad mayor, sin o casi ningún material, y desde luego ligadas a fenómenos como el racismo y la discriminación de herencia colonial.

Con todo, el trabajo revitalizador implica un trabajo colectivo de múltiples enfoques y especialidades, que en nuestro caso confluyen y han confluido exitosamente, en mayor o menor medida, de nuevo, dependiendo de los contextos específicos. Por otra parte, el trabajo aludido desarrolla la documentación, descripción y análisis estético-lingüístico de obras representativas de diversos géneros verbales como la canción en las lenguas indígenas en distintas regiones, en su relación con otras artes (pintura y video, principalmente). La caracterización de los contextos socioculturales en los que se desenvuelven los mecanismos de innovación, los procesos estéticos y los procesos de organización en torno a la composición, grabación, distribución y recepción de los materiales en lenguas indígenas se han desarrollado a través de sesiones de análisis colectivo con activistas, promotores y educadores que permiten la identificación y/o la generación de géneros proclives para su desarrollo, así como didácticas para la lectoescritura de y en lenguas indígenas. Por ejemplo, a partir de la composición e interpretación de canciones compuestas en idiomas como el maya yucateco, en la fase actual, trabajamos en la producción de audio libros que rapean los libos producidos en el pasado, como los de Consejas de un Boxito y Trabalenguas Mayas.7

7 https://www.academia.edu/33381133/Consejas_de_un_boxito.pdf_1_.pdfhttps://www.academia.edu/29220782/Kakaltaanoob_o_Kalkalak_Taanoob_Trabalenguas_Mayas

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (168)

168 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

A través de talleres de revitalización lingüística y cultural con maestros, niños, niñas y adolescentes indígenas se abordan y promueven la producción de materiales como la composición musical en lengua indígena, la creación lírica y la escenificación de historias de la literatura oral indígena a fin de producir materiales específicos, tangibles y de consumo en las propias comunidades indígenas e incluso en contextos no indígenas. También como parte de los procesos de empoderamiento, se busca la formación de posgrado y/o como animadores lingüísticos y culturales de los hablantes mismos, más allá de los procesos educativos formales, propiciando la formación en la práctica y la valorización de las habilidades propias de los hablantes, incluidas desde luego las competencias verbales, además de las no verbales.

Con este contexto en mente, el desarrollo de este proyecto, a lo largo de más de 4 décadas, ha dado como resultado la conformación de un corpus revitalizador en el mayor número de lenguas posible, que se integra tanto de libros impresos con CDs de audio y/o DVD con audio y video, reivindicando la oralidad y un enfoque miultimodal, históricamente caro y familiar a las comunidades de raigambre oral.8

Figura 1. Carátula DVD “De ajolotes, alushes, tortugas, tlacuaches y sirenas”

8 Para algunos ejemplos véase: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd0ZtAAIHPk_Qqlf-VYO3Vg

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (169)

169JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

El lugar de las artes en la revitalización lingüística

Las artes indígenas –entendidas como prácticas sociales donde convergen cosmovisiones, valores y epistemologías locales– poseen un gran potencial para revitalizar las lenguas y culturas indígenas, tema poco explorado hasta la fecha, por lo menos en México; tanto por su dinamismo y expresión creativa, como porque han participado tradicionalmente en la construcción de sentidos de pertenencia social e histórica, como procesos de auto-identificación positiva y cohesión social. Entre las artes indígenas que más destacan por su dinamismo se encuentra la composición e interpretación de canciones en lenguas indígenas. En este arte lingüístico y musical, a los géneros “tradicionales” se suman hoy nuevos formatos (como el rock, el rap, el reggae y el ska) promovidos por jóvenes indígenas. Estrechamente vinculadas a este campo se encuentran otras artes como el ritual, la poesía, la oratoria, el teatro, la danza, y la producción audiovisual, que recuperan y recrean (incluso desde espacios precarios y auto-financiados) la literatura oral propia para las nuevas generaciones. En los años recientes, el Estado mexicano, a través de sus instituciones culturales como el Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes (CONACULTA) y la Dirección General de Culturas Populares (DGCP), ha mostrado interés en explorar esta veta de la creación indígena contemporánea, a través de la iniciativa “De Tradición y Nuevas Rolas”. Sin embargo, esta estrategia gubernamental no ha incorporado, a la fecha, un eje de investigación sobre las formas estético-lingüísticas de la canción indígena, y mucho menos, sobre las maneras en que el estudio de dichos géneros interpretativos podría transformarse en estrategias para la enseñanza de las lenguas originarias, un filón que nos encontramos explorando actualmente. En este sentido, consideramos que la presente experiencia ha generado y está generando conocimientos fundamentales en las lenguas indígenas en relación con sus prácticas culturales, mostrando como éstas tienen el potencial necesario para convertirse en un incentivo para que recursos estatales, talentos comunitarios y conocimiento científico con compromiso académico converjan a favor de la revitalización de las lenguas y culturas mexicanas, con la participación activa de sus hablantes.

Las artes indígenas se reproducen dinámicamente a partir de maneras de conocer (epistemologías) y conmover (estéticas) culturalmente construidas y arraigadas. Esto no significa, sin embargo, que las artes indígenas existan en un estado de suspensión histórica, ajenas a la historia nacional o a la globalización. Lo epistemológico y lo estético nos refiere a formas concretas de construir los relatos culturales, de desarrollar las narrativas, de negociar los conocimientos, y de sancionar las historias (cf. Hobart y Kapferer, 2005; Araiza, 2010, Gell, 1998, Ginsburg, 1994, Molesky-Poz, 2006). Como expresión de la creatividad de un grupo social concreto, las artes (y en especial, la canción y otros géneros de tradición oral) contribuyen a la creación, reproducción y re-creación de la lengua y la cultura misma. Se trata de vehículos privilegiados para la transmisión de la lengua como elementos constitutivos de su gramática cultural y su estética, así como de estrategias de apropiación, re-apropiación y actualización de realidades sociales complejas (por ejemplo, en los géneros musicales que aquí llamamos “emergentes”, que corresponden a formatos de consumo global como el rock, el hip hop y el reggae, por mencionar algunos).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (170)

170 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

Foto 2. Re creación de “Consejas de un boxito” en hip hop

Lejos de ser únicamente expresiones artísticas aisladas, la canción y la música indígenas, devienen en formas de resistencia, de identidad, de revaloración de tradiciones, de reflexión sobre la lengua, la cultura y el entorno (cf. Atalli, 1995; Híjar, 2009; López Moya et.al., 2014). Un ejemplo elocuente del poder de la música en el mantenimiento de las lenguas y culturas amenazadas se encuentra entre las comunidades aborígenes australianas, en las que algunas expresiones musicales son lo único que prevalece de ciertas lenguas, que se niegan así a desaparecer y desde donde se puede plantear su revitalización (cf. Marett y Barwick, 2003), algo muy similar a los que sucede con los cantos yumanos en la península de Baja California, en México.

El potencial de la música también ha sido explorado en nuestro trabajo con el son jarocho en el nahuat y el popoluca del sur de Veracruz, el que se encuentra reflejado en la producción del documental, DVD y CD titulados “Así es amigo aquí” (http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=baTASVepapU), el cual ha tenido una importante repercusión y demanda en el ámbito regional, con un importante efecto revitalizador de las lenguas y culturas indígenas aludidas. Estos efectos han estado basados en el acompañamiento de las iniciativas de músicos locales que han emprendido la aventura emocional de componer y tocar en sus lenguas, en un principio concebido como una actividad no remunerada, ahora conviertiéndose en un modus vivendi también, un punto crítico en la reivindicación de cualquier lengua. Así, los integrantes de La Mar Ehegat, o Brisa del Mar han convertido su “afición” en parte importante de su sustento económico, representando además un modelo a seguir para las nuevas generaciones, demostrando que cantar en sus lenguas no es solo digno sino un camino a seguir en la supervivencia y el bienestar económico9.

9 https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100005732505468

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (171)

171JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

En este sentido, el trabajo del ADLI también ha demostrado que los diversos esfuerzos por documentar y revitalizar las lenguas mexicanas, a través de textos y publicaciones impresos no deben limitarse ni mucho menos a la parte escrita, sino que se requiere un enfoque ecológico (cf. Mühlhäusler, 1996; Córdova, 2014, Flores Farfán, 2013), holístico, en el que las artes indígenas – sobre todo las de interpretación o performáticas, como la canción, el teatro y el cine – sean incorporadas como coadyuvantes y dinamizadoras, aspectos clave en el desarrollo de una serie de habilidades concurrentes, entre otras pero no exclusivamente la expresión oral y la creación escrita. Las artes performáticas se sostienen también en la ejecución de actos corporales a través de los cuales se instauran y restauran, se ponen en escena cosmovisiones, historias y aspiraciones de los pueblos mismos, recreándolos. La antropología del performance (Taylor, 2003) permite entender cómo la interpretación de canciones en lengua indígena logra tener repercusiones también en el campo del conocimiento “formal” (el aprendizaje de la lecto escruitura), como ha ocurrido en el Concurso de la Canción de Día de Muertos en la Sierra Mazateca. Sobre éste, Faudree (2013) encontró que la composición e interpretación de canciones en mazateco ha favorecido, después de varios años, la adquisición de habilidades de lectoescritura en dicho idioma, además de haber impactado favorablemente en su revitalización. Esto nos acerca a las formas en que en nuestro proyecto hemos buscado suscitar los procesos de revitalización, desarrolando una metodología propia, como veremos a continuación.

Metodologías revitalizadoras

El proyecto se ha apoyado y acompañado en un enfoque de investigación colaborativa con promotores culturales, creadores comunitarios, investigadores y artistas de comunidades indígenas de diversos estados de la República Mexicana; por mencionar algunos: Yucatán, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Sonora y Baja California. A través de la documentación activa – con y acompañando a los propios actores (Flores Farfán y Ramallo, 2010) –se registran distintos géneros propios en lengua indígena, reivindicando la estética de sus estructuras e innovaciones socioculturales y lingüísticas, propiciándolas. Entre otros de estos elementos se encuentran la variedad de los formatos musicales vigentes (e.g. rap, rock, ska, etc.), las motivaciones y reglas que intervienen en la composición lírica y el performance (e.g. canciones monolingües o bilingües), las estéticas verbales mismas (e.g. el tipo de lengua, sus géneros), las estructuras e ideologías lingüísticas presentes (e.g. el purismo), así como el uso de neologismos y otras modificaciones de los idiomas como el desarrollo de estilos verbales propios vinculados a la creación lírica.

En los talleres se presentan insumos para la interacción con la comunidad, incluidos niños y padres de familia, con contenidos basados en las epistemologías propias de las comunidades, que buscan desatar dinámicas revitalizadoras con un enfoque lúdico, de disfrute estético, en que las estructuras de participación son prerrogativa de la audiencia – de ahí la idea de una metodología de revitalización indirecta – con detonadores

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (172)

172 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

como el audio y el video, favoreciendo un consumo cultural propio vinculado sobre todo al ámbito familiar y comunitario. Junto con el registro etnográfico, fonográfico y audiovisual de estas expresiones y otras manifestaciones artísticas “espontáneas”, el trabajo se ubica en relación con sus espacios socioculturales propios, y el rol que las propias comunidades de hablantes le atribuyen en relación con la identidad y la tradición. La originalidad de esta metodología y proyecto de investigación reside en que se trata no solo de etnografiar y analizar colaborativamente las estéticas lingüísticas en su contexto sociocultural, sino de promoverlas. Inscrito en nuestra propuesta de innovación está un modelo pionero de producción y diseminación de material de alta calidad basado en la experiencia del ADLI. Éste retoma elementos de la didáctica de las lenguas que enfatizan la efectividad de las interacciones de aprendizaje en que los individuos se desarrollan con base en su expresión lúdica (cf. por ejemplo Cots et. al., 2007) y de disfrute estético, con pertinencia y pertenencia cultural y lingüística. Así, se busca desatar el potencial de las artes y los medios audiovisuales en la revitalización de las lenguas, fortaleciendo y propiciando las recreación de epistemologías propias (Flores Farfán, 2013), como poderosos medios tanto para su recuperación, como para su desarrollo lingüístico y cultural. Esto permite tanto abordar e incluso expandir la insuficiente producción y disponibilidad de materiales educativos que afectan a las lenguas indígenas en muchas de las regiones (e.g. huave, yaqui, pai pai, cucapá), así como ir consolidando un corpus revitalizador multimodal que redunde en un mejor y mayor conocimiento de las ecologías sociolingüísticas de la retención, orientado al mantenimiento y el desarrollo lingüístico, contribuyendo a la reversión del desplazamiento lingüístico y cultural.

Proponer la reactivación de la lengua a través de su uso en la expresión creativa multimodal da soporte a procesos de recuperación de saberes culturales locales, impulsando procesos de auto-identificación positiva y cohesión comunitaria, desarrollando materiales educativos útiles no solo ni mucho menos exclusivamente para las escuelas sino para las comunidades en su conjunto, con incluso procesos de comunicación y entendimiento interculturales. En este último campo, en su relativamente larga experiencia, el ADLI también ha propiciado ya algunos experimentos musicales para la sociedad mayor (véase, por ejemplo, la obra sinfónica K’ay Nikte’, http://www.lenguasindigenas.mx/blog-de-noticias/item/175-poema.html10 y Flores Farfán 2015).

En suma, los conceptos teórico-metodológicos de esta iniciativa implican una metodología colaborativa entendida como un método de revitalización lingüística indirecta (cf. e.g. Flores Farfán, 2015), en que el estudio y promoción de por ejemplo las formas de creación y composición musical pone especial atención al contexto específico de cada región o comunidad que nos

10 Texto con traducción: https://www.academia.edu/28684691/Kay_Nicté_traducción_.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (173)

173JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

ocupa. Esto nos ha llevado a indagar, por un lado, cómo las artes indígenas se desenvuelven o pueden desenvolverse en relación con proyectos educativos y comunitarios.

Por otro lado, partimos de que la relación de los pueblos indígenas con el Estado mexicano es regional e históricamente específica, por lo que el papel que las artes pueden desempeñar en procesos de revitalización lingüística a través de entidades estatales como la escuela merece un análisis comparativo centrado con todo en cuerpos de datos comunes, los cuales involucran géneros musicales, formatos líricos, composición y construcción de rimas, simbolismos sonoros e identificación de estéticas verbales de las lenguas mismas; junto con el surgimiento de comunidades artísticas, conformación de públicos y gustos musicales populares, así como su recepción mediática, respaldo institucional, entre otros factores a investigar e intervenir. Estas pesquisas permiten entender cómo es que los saberes culturales y los nuevos sentidos identitarios se van recomponiendo como procesos de revitalización y, no pocas veces, de resistencia lingüística y cultural, a su vez acompañándolos y favoreciéndolos.

Producción de materiales educativos y trabajo comunitario

El trabajo en el terreno parte de una lógica ascendente, relacional e informal, co-participativa y emergente, lo que constituye un modelo de revitalización lingüística indirecta y de monolingüismo inverso, con el que se ha trabajado exitosamente en el pasado (véase e.g. Flores Farfán, 2011, 2013). Como hemos sugerido, este método consiste en el desarrollo de dinámicas con los propios actores tanto en la producción de materiales, como en las mismas comunidades de origen a través de talleres, incluyendo el mayor número posible de hablantes diversos, con base en el liderazgo de actores clave como investigadores, artistas o activistas comunitarios.

La participación de los propios hablantes como actores clave de los procesos revitalizadores es un elemento fundamental. La experiencia que hemos desarrollado incluye la conformación de equipos revitalizadores que incluyen hablantes con diversas habilidades complementarias para la producción de materiales no escolares, sino de disfrute, afirmación y consumo comunitario, sobre todo con y para niños y jóvenes. En la conformación de los equipos o grupos de practicantes, se despliegan habilidades como las de investigación y recopilación de la tradición oral, las de ilustradores y artistas de los materiales, bajo las premisas de compromiso con la calidad, la belleza estética y la reproducción de valores positivos como el respeto comunitario y las relaciones horizontales, la gratuidad y generosidad solidarias que acompañan los procesos y el interés por su producción.

Tomemos brevemente como ilustración el equipo maya yucateco, uno de los más exitosos y con mayor impacto en la historia del proyecto desde su inicio. Éste ha sido conformado por un par de lingüistas mayas, Flor Canché Teh y Fidencio Briceño Chel, un pintor y caricaturista maya, Marcelo Jiménez

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (174)

174 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

Santos, más una serie de voluntarios que han participado en distintos momentos del proyecto, incluida una locutora, promotores culturales locales y niños de las comunidades, con el acompañamiento de otros participantes como investigadores, animadores y músicos.

Como un ejemplo del material producido considérese brevemente uno de los primeros materiales producidos por este equipo, el libro de adivinanzas mayas, Na’at le ba’ala’ paalen. Adivina esta cosa ninio.11 Originalmente el libro se hizo a color, luego se produjo una versión para iluminar-colorear con audio.12

Paralelamente se cuenta con una animación de algunas de las adivinanzas, utilizadas para incentivar dinámicas en los talleres de revitalización.13 Más aún, también se cuenta con un sitio en internet, en el que se tienen diferentes lenguas, en el caso de maya yucateco, su página hace asequibles los libros, e incluso presenta algunos juegos basados en ellos.14 El camino para la construcción de lo que ahora son más de 20 títulos base, con diferentes variantes (e.g. libros a color, con versiones para iluminar) se dio de manera relativamente espontánea, emergente. En la primera fase del proyecto, hace alrededor de dos décadas, se publicó este título con las características aludidas. Añado que se elaboró en un papel “tradicional”, parecido al amate15,

tambien hecho de fibras naturales, bautizado como hun, “papel” en maya. Se contactó a Marcelo Jiménez Santos, el talentoso pintor maya aludido, para hacer las ilustraciones de las adivinanzas recopiladas por Briceño Chel, bajo los auspicios de un proyecto CONACYT.16 Interesante mencionar que el propio Marcelo no quería prácticamente cobrar por su trabajo, dado que lo consideró un proyecto en beneficio directo de su comunidad. Llegando al punto de obsequiar el boceto de las ilustraciones de las mismas adivinanzas para iluminar también ya mencionado, tras haber comentado esta posibilidad con el autor de estas líneas. Esto facilitó el libro para iluminar de adivinanzas con audio, lo cual ya se convirtió en un modus operandi.

11Véasehttp://pages.ucsd.edu/~jhaviland/Publications/AdvinianzasMayas.pdf

12 Véase https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxPugwHdfxJXdXR3VHdzN3MtbjFpMEY3d2pwbjYyZGhrWHRz/view

13 Véase https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwmgIaUg0J0&t=3s

14 Véase http://www.lenguasindigenas.mx/index.php/maya.html

15 El “papel” amate está hecho de la corteza de un árbol del mismo nombre, que pintado ha llegado a ser una de las artesanías favoritas producidas por los nahuas del Balsas, que a su vez lo adquieren de los "ñujus oyuhus" (“otomíes”, otro grupo originario, de la Sierra Norte de Puebla), muy exitoso en el mercado turístico de artesanías desde por lo menos los años ochentas. Este material también lo hemos recuperado para elaborar materiales educativos semejantes en náhuatl, la lengua de los nahuas.

16 Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, México.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (175)

175JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

Foto 3. Niños en taller de lengua maya

Como veremos, todos estos materiales son restituidos a través de los talleres aludidos, como parte de los incentivos de la participación espontánea de sobretodo los niños, aunque no exclusivamente, dado que si bien se convoca a éstos, los mismos llegan con hermanos, primos, tíos, e incluso abuelos, lo cual también es afortunado, en la medida en que favorece la relación intergeneracional y la transmisión de la lengua.

El proyecto resultó en varias reediciones de los libros, y de altos tirajes al llegar incluso a ser seleccionado por la Secretaría de Educación Pública como parte de unos de sus programas de bibliotecas públicas, rondando un total de más de 100 mil ejemplares, sumando ambos productos. En el aspecto cuantitativo, baste decir que la producción en su conjunto de éstos, junto con los siguentes materiales que se han ido conformando en la región yucateca a los largo de los años, representan alrededor del 10 por ciento de la población hablante de maya yucateco, una de las lenguas más numerosas en el concierto de las poblaciones originarias en México, con alrededor de un millón de personas. Como parte de las intervenciones en las comunidades, se convocan y desarrollan talleres de distinto tipo y duración, exclusivamente en lengua indígena – lo que llamamos monolingüismo inverso, una estrategia de reposicionamiento de las lenguas minorizadas ante los embates neocoloniales. En el caso del maya yucateco, uno de los casos de mayor éxito del proyecto, se han trabajado géneros no menores desde el punto de vista de la lógica y la relevancia cultural y lingüística – las epistemologias propias. Por ejemplo, las adivinanzas son un género primigenio en la socialización cultural y lingüística primaria, con una historia milenaria, que se utilizaban para medir la destreza mental ya en la época precolombina, en los ritos de inicio de los candidatos a señores de la clase gobernante. Guardando las debidas proporciones, algo similar sucedía y sucede entre los nahuas, en que las adivinanzas, por no hablar de los trabalenguas, un género con el que se traslapan, son un tipo de

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (176)

176 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

discurso a través del cual es posible tasar a los mejores hablantes, conocidos como tentetl17 hoy en día, en la zona del Balsas por lo menos. Estos géneros, por supuesto amenazados por la modernidad chatarrera, se recuperan, recrean y reposicionan en el ámbito comunitario mismo, vía los talleres comunitarios conducidos por los propios coautores y otros voluntarios comunitarios, en los que a través de juegos impulsados con la proyección de las adivinanzas, que se invita a los niños a responder, se retribuye la participación espontánea con libros u otros materiales, como el video de las adivinanzas mismas.18 En el momento actual, trabajamos en la producción de un material que rapea un par de los libros mayas (Consejas de un Boxito y Trabalenguas Mayas) para favorecer aún más los procesos de lecto-escritura a través de un género musical que ha tenido una gran aceptación entre los jóvenes mayas, en esta maravillosa lengua de mis ancestros.

En suma, los procesos de investigación y de reivindicación que tienen un impacto en la acción revitalizadora, apelan a la inmersión total en lengua originaria, favoreciendo su uso y posicionamiento en el ámbito comunitario - lo cual por lo menos indirectamente influye en la revitalización de la lengua. Como queda sugerido, un primer paso ha sido, y sigue siendo, la construcción de materiales con actores clave de los procesos, lo cual produce insumos tangibles que circulan y adquieren vida propia en la voz de una diversidad de actores orignarios (y no), transgeneracionalmente.

Figura 2. Hun “La Sandía”, Marcelo Jiménez Santos

17 Tentetl es literalmente “piedra de labio”. En la época prehispánica, se le conocía como bezote, un piercing de jade, insertado en el labio, símbolo del dominio de la más alta retórica.

18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwmgIaUg0J0&t=170s

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (177)

177JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

Conclusión

El trabajo descrito ha generado conocimiento no desligado de lo “aplicado” en torno a los mecanismos socioculturales, los criterios estético-lingüísticos y las prácticas pedagógicas propias que influyen en el desarrollo, circulación y recepción de las estéticas y artes indígenas. A través de la documentación, sistematización y análisis conjunto con hablantes y artistas, se busca desarrollar y producir materiales como insumos educativos con pertinencia y pertenencia con, entre otros, maestros, niños, niñas y adolescentes indígenas en las regiones y lenguas aludidas. A través de las relaciones ya existentes, se busca que docentes, activistas, estudiantes y las comunidades en general conozcan y experimenten con las formas estéticas que proporcionan diversos géneros indígenas en su relacion con artes afines, practicando la composición literaria y musical en lengua indígena. Estas “nuevas” formas líricas a su vez han sido grabadas y distribuidas por canales diversos asequibles y viables, mostrando el potencial de las artes y los medios audiovisuales en la revitalización de las lenguas, tarea en la que el grupo de trabajo se ha especializado desde hace varios años (Flores Farfán, 2013).

Todos estos materiales y procesos son desde luego también sometidos a un riguroso análisis que permite producir sendas publicaciones académicas, de interés y utilidad para la comunidad científica y el público en general, abriendo líneas de investigación en un campo muy poco trabajado en México.19 Esto permite abordar la insuficiente producción y disponibilidad de materiales educativos que afectan a las lenguas indígenas en las regiones trabajadas (e.g. los casos del huave, el yaqui, el pai pai y el cucapá, lenguas donde casi o llanamente no existe material alguno). En este sentido, el proyecto contribuye a la conformación de un corpus revitalizador multimedia que apunta a visibilizar y propiciar el uso de las lenguas de la manera más profusa posible, así como a entender sus dinámicas desde un punto de vista de generación de conocimientos que permiten crear y recrear el legado originario. Al proponer la comprensión cabal junto con la recuperación y reactivación de la lengua a través de su uso en la expresión creativa performática también se fortalecen espacios de interacción con la sociedad no-indígena, favoreciendo así procesos de comunicación y entendimiento interculturales; por ejemplo, a través de las redes sociales y otros medios como el audio y el video.

Hemos demostrado que por su dinamismo y capacidad de expresión creativa, que participan en la construcción de sentidos de pertenencia social e histórica, procesos de auto-identificación positiva y cohesión social, las artes en general y las indígenas en particular constituyen un filón con enorme potencial para la revitalización lingüística y cultural. Así, las artes verbales indigenas constituyen un poderoso vehículo para la transmisión y desarrollo de las lenguas, como parte constitutiva de su gramática cultural y estética, una estrategia destacada para la apropiación, re-apropiación y actualización

19 Cf. https://ciesasdocencia.academia.edu/JoséAntonioFloresFarfán.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (178)

178 LAS ARTES Y LOS MEDIOS EN LOS PROCESOS DE REVITALIZACIÓN...

de realidades sociales complejas. La producción de materiales en lenguas mexicanas facilita y favorece la adquisición de habilidades de lectoescritura e impacta favorablemente la revitalización lingüística y cultural, potenciando el desarrollo lingüístico y educativo, juntamente a la reafirmación de identidades originarias profundas que se renuevan y así garantizan su continuidad en un mundo siempre amenazante.

Bibliografía

Araiza Hernández, E., et. al.(2010). Las artes del ritual. Nuevas propuestas para la antropología del arte desde el occidente de México. Morelia, México: El Colegio de Michoacán.

Atalli, J. (1995). Ruidos. Ensayo sobre la economía política de la música. México: Siglo XXI.

Córdova Hernández, L. (2014). Esfuerzos de revitalización de la lengua chuj en contextos fronterizos multilingües del estado de Chiapas.

Acercamientos y aportes desde la perspectiva ecológica ascendente. Tesis de doctorado en Antropología Social. México: CIESAS.

Cots, J., Armengol L., Arnó E., Irún M., y Llurda E. (2007). La conciencia lingüística en la enseñanza de lenguas. Barcelona, España: GRAÓ.

Faudree, P. (2013). Singing for the Dead: The Politics of Indigenous Revival in Mexico. Durham: Duke University Press.

Fishman, J. (1991). Reversing language shift. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Flores Farfán, J.A. (2002). The Use of Multimedia and the Arts in Language

Revitalization, Maintenance, and Development: The Case of the Balsas Nahuas of Guerrero, Mexico. En: Burnaby, B.J. y Reyhner, J.A.

Indigenous Languages Across the Community. (pp.225-236). Arizona, USA: Northern Arizona University.Flores Farfán, J.A. (2011). “Keeping the fire alive. A Decade of Language

Revitalization in Mexico”. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 2011 (212), 189–209.

Flores Farfán, J.A. (2013). “El Potencial de las Artes y los Medios Audiovisuales en la Revitalización Lingüística”. Revista de Lingüística Teórica y Aplicada, 51 (1), 33-52.

Flores Farfán, J.A. (2015). Na’at le ba’ala’ paalen, na’at le ba’ala’ paalen. Adivina esta cosa, ninio. La experiencia de revitalización, mantenimiento y desarrollo lingüístico y cultural en México con énfasis en el maya yucateco. Revista Trace, 2015 (67), 92-120.

Flores Farfán, J.A., y Ramallo F. (2010). “Exploring links between documentation, sociolinguistics and language revitalization: an introduction”. En Flores Farfán, J. A. y Ramallo, F. (eds.). New Perspectives on Endangered Languages. (1-11). Ámsterdam: John Benjamins.

Gell, A. (1998). Art and Agency: An Anthropological Theory. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Ginsburg, F. (1994). “Embedded Aesthetics: Creating Discursive Space for Indigenous Media.” Cultural Anthropology, 9 (3), 365-382.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (179)

179JOSÉ ANTONIO FLORES FARFÁN

Híjar Sánchez, F. coord. (2009). Cunas, ramas y encuentros sonoros. Doce ensayos sobre patrimonio musical de México. México: Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes-DGCP.

Hobart, A., y Kapferer B. (2005). Aesthetics in Performance: Formations of Symbolic Construction and Experience. Nueva York y Oxford: Berghahn Books.

Hornberger, N. (2014). “Hasta que me convertí en profesional, no fui, conscientemente, indígena”: la trayectoria de un educador intercultural

bilingüe en la revitalización de la lengua indígena. Revista de lengua, identidad y educación, 13 (4), 283–299.Kroskrity, P. (2013). Narrative discriminations in Central California’s indigenous

narrative traditions. In Bischoff S., Cole D., Fountain A., y Miyash*ta, M. (eds.), The persistence of language: Constructing and confronting the past and present in the voices of Jane H. Hill (pp. 321–338). Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Marett, A., y Barwick L. (2003). “Endangered songs and endangered languages.” In Blythe, J., y McKenna R. Maintaining the Links: Language Identity and the Land (pp.144-51). Foundation for Endangered Languages: Bath, RU.

Molesky-Poz, J. (2006). Contemporary Maya Spirituality: The Ancient Ways Are Not Lost. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Mühlhäusler, P. (1996). Linguistic ecology. Language change and linguistic imperialism in the Pacific region. Routledge: Londres.

López Moya, M., Cedillo, E. A., y Zebadúa Carbonell J.P. coord. (2014). Etnorock. Los rostros de una música global en el sur de México. UNICACH, CESMECA, Juan Pablos Editor: México.

Taylor, D. (2003). The archive and the repertoire: performing cultural memory in the Americas. Durham, Londres: Duke University Press.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (180)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (181)

CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS: CUANDO LOS HABLANTES ASUMEN SU AGENCIA DE

REVITALIZADORES LINGÜISTICOS

Inge Sichra

Resumen: Revertir el efecto de discrimen hacia los hablantes de lenguas indígenas y, por extensión, hacia las lenguas indígenas, podría ir por dos vías: o se cambia el marco social y político origen del discrimen o se cambia el efecto, se interviene en él y se adopta una postura de resistencia a la “tendencia”, a la corriente, al “main stream”. En ambos casos, estamos ante actos políticos propiamente dichos. En el primero, el responsable es el Estado, en el segundo, son las personas, madres y padres quienes recurren al potencial descolonizador del uso y transmisión de las lenguas indígenas, a lo subversivo, al redescubrimiento de la identidad negada o prohibida o invisibilizada, a la audibilidad de sus lenguas maternas. El trabajo brinda una mirada a este ejercicio de ciudadanía intercultural plena que están llevando adelante graduados y estudiantes del Programa de Formación en EIB para los Países Andinos (PROEIB Andes), madres en su mayoría, pero también padres indígenas que crían a sus hijos en lengua indígena en espacios urbanos. Se trata de los anhelos, las vicisitudes y los triunfos de irreverentes acciones contracorriente sustentadas en la determinación de ser coherentes con el discurso de reivindicación y ejercicio de derecho lingüístico y cultural. En el fondo de la discusión está la agencia que le compete a los propietarios de las lenguas y el rol del Estado en la revitalización lingüística.

Palabras claves: Adquisición de lenguas indígenas, transmisión de lenguas indígenas, agencia lingüística, bilingüismo temprano, familias bilingües.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (182)

182 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

BILINGUAL UPBRINGING OF URBAN INDIGENOUS CHILDREN: WHEN SPEAKERS ASSUME THEIR AGENCY AS LINGUISTIC REVITALISERS

Abstract: Reversing discrimination towards speakers of Indigenous languages and by extention towards Indigenous languages could take place either by changing the social and political frame which promotes discrimination (revolution) or by resisting hegemonic mainstream. This article deals with the second political approach excercised by Indigenous profesionals in Bolivia. I present evidences of intercultural citizenship of mothers and fathers who take the decisión of transmitting their language to their children in urban setting, providing them “the first words” in Indigenous languages. I trace hopes, illusions, challenges and setbacks but also succes of the irreverent actions ment to regain control over Indigenous languages a mother tongue and its permanence as first language in the family. Quite contradictory, at the end of the endeavour, language revitalizers are admired and receive approval from family members, friends and strangers. In the last part, I discuss the role of the state in family language revitalization.

Keywords: Indigenous language adquisition, Indigenous language transmission, Language agency, Early bilinguism, Bilingual families.

Puntos de partida

Está en boga y nadie discute, al menos desde una posición políticamente correcta, la promoción de los derechos lingüísticos y culturales, menos en Bolivia, donde podemos dar por sentado que la refundación del Estado contempla el disfrute e institucionalidad lingüística en tanto se trata de un Estado plurinacional. El Art. 5 de la nueva Constitución de 2009 y diversas leyes como la Ley de Educación Avelino Siñani y Elizardo Pérez (2011) establecen oficialmente el plurilingüismo en la nueva Bolivia. Estamos entonces en un momento en el cual no es imperiosa o necesaria la resistencia contra una prohibición explícita o una ideología política negadora de lenguas indígenas –minorizadas. Reina la democracia lingüística en Bolivia, sancionada por las leyes y la sociedad.

No obstante, persiste la vulnerabilidad de las lenguas indígenas, aún de las habladas por millones, como son las lenguas andinas quechua y aimara. De las 36 lenguas oficializadas por la Constitución en el arriba mencionado Art. 5, la mitad está en el grupo “seriamente amenazadas” y extintas si nos atenemos a las cifras del penúltimo censo 2001 (del último censo de 2012 no se han publicado las cifras referidas a conocimiento y uso de lenguas).

El desplazamiento de las lenguas indígenas se debe a que sigue vigente una tácita prohibición social y una ideología lingüística negadora de las lenguas indígenas tras 5 siglos de colonización. Sin condiciones sociales,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (183)

183INGE SICHRA

económicas, políticas, territoriales adversas a los pueblos indígenas, a los individuos indígenas, al ser, conocer, saber y decidir indígena, no habría postura contraria a las lenguas indígenas por parte de los mismos hablantes, no serían vulnerables las lenguas indígenas ni hablaríamos de pérdida o muerte lingüística en Latinoamérica, y en Bolivia, en particular.

El marco de vulnerabilidad y pérdida, entonces, no se explica por causas naturales, deterioro de células, envejecimiento, proceso de oxidación, por así decirlo, de las lenguas indígenas, es producto de una construcción socio-política que los mismos concernidos han asumido como propia y es nutrida por la sociedad hegemónica, el poder social. El deterioro y la pérdida de lenguas se promueven, por así decirlo, “desde adentro” en respuesta a una presión “de afuera”. Una manera de deterioro es vía el “silenciamiento intergeneracional”, como lo llaman algunos (Chi 2011). Silenciamiento, desde esta perspectiva, connota reversibilidad, posibilidad de volver audible la “lengua dormida”.

Revertir el efecto de esta construcción social de discrimen hacia los hablantes de lenguas indígenas y, por extensión, hacia las lenguas indígenas, podría ir por dos vías: o se cambia el marco social y político origen del discrimen (cambio revolucionario, la ilusión o promesa de la refundación del Estado, en el caso de Bolivia) o se cambia el efecto, se interviene en él y se adopta una postura de resistencia a la corriente hegemónica, al main stream. En ambos casos, estamos ante actos políticos propiamente dichos.

En el primer escenario, se trata de reacciones de masas que desencadenan cambios políticos, en el segundo escenario, se trata de individuos, madres y padres afectados por el discrimen lingüístico. Personas que recurren al potencial descolonizador del uso y transmisión de las lenguas indígenas, a lo subversivo, al redescubrimiento de la identidad negada o prohibida o invisibilizada, a la audibilidad de sus lenguas maternas. En términos de Janks & Ivenic (1992) son actos emancipatorios a partir de “recognising the forces which are leading you to fit in with the status quo and resisting them”. Para Giroux (1992), serían actos de resistencia por el rechazo de las reglas básicas y premisas de un marco participando activamente en el cambio de dicho marco. En términos de Bonfil Batalla (1988), son evidencias de control cultural en tanto ejercicio de la capacidad de decisión sobre los elementos culturales.

Tal como lo ha mostrado el movimiento feminista, la agencia de los individuos no es absolutamente desdeñable y puede desencadenar verdaderas revoluciones que los estados no están dispuestos a hacer, aunque la grandilocuencia partidaria así lo pregone, como es el caso de Bolivia actualmente.

Madres y padres revitalizadores

Voy a presentar elementos de este ejercicio de ciudadanía intercultural plena que están llevando adelante un grupo de graduados del PROEIB Andes,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (184)

184 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

madres en su mayoría, pero también padres, que socializan a sus hijos en lengua indígena en el contexto urbano en el que viven.1 Veremos los anhelos, las vicisitudes y los triunfos de una irreverente acción contracorriente que surge en personas cuya formación universitaria provoca una reflexión y postura autoconsciente del rol que pueden asumir y de la acción política que pueden ejercer en una sociedad intercultural. Eriksen (2002) habla de “cultural brokers”, aquellos individuos que dominan los códigos hegemónico y minorizado y quienes, estando alejados de la cultura tradicional (asentados en zonas urbanas, por ejemplo), son los mejor equipados para servir a los intereses de las culturas minorizadas.

Son madres y padres bilingües de cuna o se volvieron bilingües durante su escolarización. Se trata de Charo (Ch), Ruth (R), Epifania (Ep), Edna (E), Roxana (Ro), Valentín (Va), todos de origen quechua, y de Marcia (Ma) de origen guaraní, residentes en áreas urbanas. Ellos perciben críticamente su entorno para resignificarlo: “El contexto urbano se presenta monolingüe castellano aunque solamente por invisibilización del bilingüismo”, expresa Edna sobre su ciudad de origen y residencia, Sucre. El núcleo familiar de varios de los revitalizadores es predominantemente castellano: en algunos casos, son parejas bilingües pero en otros solamente la madre es bilingüe. Han estudiado durante dos años y medio en la maestría de Educación Intercultural Bilingüe del PROEIB Andes, donde experimentaron el capital cultural y económico de las lenguas indígenas al ser el dominio de éstas requisito de ingreso al Programa. Trabajan en universidades, instituciones académicas de formación docente o siguen estudios de doctorado. Expresan que se dejaron impresionar por otros ejemplos de familias bilingües de lenguas de prestigio (francés-castellano, alemán-castellano)2 y por textos del área de lenguaje para motivarse y atreverse a emprender acciones de revitalización lingüística en el área urbana. Es así que se pregunta Marcia en algún momento de su formación: ”será imposible transmitir la lengua indígena en un contexto castellano monolingüe?”.

Los sentidos fundamentales que se consolidan con la lengua están intrínsecamente relacionados con la noción de etnicidad de Fishman (1991), en tanto incluyen la dimensión de paternidad (legado familiar), patrimonio (legado grupal de territorio, lengua, religiosidad, arte, indumentaria, valores, conocimientos, etc.) y fenomenología (experiencias personales). Y ya que de etnicidad se habla, una aproximación operativa a esta noción nos la brinda Eriksen (2002: 58), cuando enfatiza su característica relacional y situacional.

1 Leanne Hinton (2013) compiló Bringing Our Languages Home: Language Revitalization for Families. Berkeley: Heyday Books donde recoge 13 experiencias de socialización en lenguas indígenas de varios continentes.

2 Haber sido docente del área de Lenguaje en el PROEIB Andes me permitió compartir con los estudiantes mi experiencia de transmisión del alemán en el contexto castellano hablante de Cochabamba. Incluyo en este trabajo algunos testimonios (Inge = I).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (185)

185INGE SICHRA

Etnicidad no sería la propiedad de un grupo; por el contrario, existe entre (between) grupos y no en (within) grupos. Desde esta comprensión, etnicidad es la comunicación sistemática de diferencias culturales entre grupos que se consideran distintos. “It appears whenever cultural differencies are made relevant in social interaction, and it should thus be studied at the level of social life, not at the level of symbolic culture” (Eriksen 2002: 58).

¿Qué motiva a estas y estos irreverentes?

La identidad

Si bien las madres y padres revitalizadores cuyos testimonios presento a continuación no conforman un grupo que intercambie experiencias, comparta un proyecto o se proyecte hacia algún objetivo común, las motivaciones para socializar a los hijos en lengua indígena en un entorno urbano castellano- hablante son similares. En el sentido fenomenológico de Fishman (1991), aparecen razones que exhalan afectividad – lo maternal – lo infantil – la vivencia de dar vida, criar, dar lengua de las madres.

Ch: Mi primer deseo fue escuchar a mis hijos pronunciar el quechua, así como yo escuchaba que lo hacían los niños que adquirían el quechua como lengua materna. Unas voces delgadas, dulces, fluidas y naturales, eso era lo que yo más anhelaba.

E: Lo más lindo es cuando Adriana habla el quechua y es bonito escucharla, es un gustito aparte. .. mi hija se ganó el apodo de Jaqayqa por su excelente pronunciación de la postvelar, los parientes ríen y gozan con su quechua.

El mero gusto “estético”, la sensación enternecedora de la lengua nativa que motiva a las madres es una faceta del deseo –hasta instinto- de prolongarse en los hijos con su lengua, la literal “lengua materna”. Mi propia experiencia también lo refleja:

I: Hubo un momento fundacional, desde la barriga, no desde la cabeza. Fue cuando sostenía a Santiago en brazos de vuelta en casa de la clínica. Empezó a llorar. Como madre primeriza a los 33 años estaba aún presa de temores que opacaban los impulsos o instintos. Mi esposo tomó al bebé y le cantó ‘arrurru mi niño’ por unos segundos, luego me lo dio y dijo algo así como “ahora cántale tú en alemán, pues”. Habían pasado muchas décadas desde que escuchara una canción infantil en alemán, no conocía casi ninguna letra, dudé un poco y tararé una. Allí empezó todo. Allí puse el dial afectivo, empecé a amamantar, de criar en esa lengua.

Parte de este vínculo se plasma también en el deseo de generar condiciones para una identificación positiva del infante:

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (186)

186 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Va: Que mi hija sea segura de sí misma, valore lo que tiene en su entorno familiar (me refiero a la lengua quechua, ya que nuestros familiares, tanto paternos como maternos son quechua hablantes).

Escuchar, sentir y expresar el origen de la madre o el padre daría seguridad al niño y genera orgullo:

Cha: Los anhelos que me inquietaron en hablarles en quechua, como el que sintieran orgullo por ser quiénes eran. Es decir, que ahora muchos niños, jóvenes y adultos se avergüenzan de sus raíces, niegan a sus padres, imitan a otros.

La lengua es un vehículo de cohesión familiar a través de la herencia familiar en el sentido de paternidad de Fishman (1991):

Ru:¿Por qué no enseñarle y dejarle esa herencia a mi hija? Es algo que sí conozco –la lengua-y que es propio de la cultura quechua, entonces como madre me siento en la obligación de enseñarle a mi hija algo que sé y que es importante para mi cultura de procedencia.

I: Tenía el deseo de no romper con mi familia de origen y vivir cerca de ella a la distancia.

Intimamente relacionado con la identificación familiar aparece la identificación étnica, incorporar al infante a un “nosotros” más amplio que el de los lazos sanguíneos. La comunidad lingüística a la que se incorpora al nuevo hablante es sobre todo, una “comunidad cultural”:

Ed: Que “sepa (ella) que detrás de todo esfuerzo estuvo la convicción de mantener la cultura viva en alguien de la familia y que saber la lengua le signifique ser natural con nosotros los quechuas en cualquier espacio o situación comunicativa real.

Cha: Que ellos pudieran comunicarse con personas quechuas y por medio de ello ser asumidos como uno de nosotros.

Las expresiones nos remiten al entendimiento de etnicidad como un fenómeno a la vez objetivo -que incluye la lengua-, como también subjetivo - la diferenciación frente a otros (van den Berghe 1975). Es también evidente la propiedad relacional de esta noción (Eriksen 2002).

El legado patrimonial a través de la lengua es un motivo muy fuerte, no solamente tratándose de cultura ancestral indígena:

Ro: Para gozar de la oportunidad de conocer nuestro modo de vida. La idea que subyace a este anhelo es dar continuidad- como de costumbre- a la vigencia de nuestra identidad indígena-originaria quechua como una alternativa de vida.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (187)

187INGE SICHRA

Ep: El anhelo que tuve fue que mis dos hijas se identifiquen con el ‘ser’ quechua. Además, que no se queden monolingües y que comprendan que el ser quechua no sólo es hablar la lengua; sino también comprender la lógica cultural de este pueblo indígena.

I: La primera palabra que Santiago pronunció fue “arbeiten” (trabajar). Creo que desde el principio sentí que la lengua debía estar empapada con lo cultural y lo afectivo, que así iba a poder “seducir” a los hijos con ella, con el sentido completo de la lengua: más allá de ser una manera de comunicarnos, es un manera de sentir, ver, jugar, hacer, pensar, reír, cantar, comer!

Por último, el padre en el grupo expande la noción de patrimonio hasta la identidad nacional plurilingüística:

Va: Que sea capaz de comprender la diversidad lingüística existente en nuestro país sin avergonzarse de ella, y sin menospreciarla, porque una actitud así estaría yendo a incentivar o reproducir sentimientos de inferioridad en ella y en su entorno que habla el quechua u otra lengua indígena.

En sus distintos niveles, la motivación para la socialización lingüística en lengua indígena adquiere una función política de revertir sentimientos de inferioridad, de redimir el sufrimiento que quizás tuvieron los mismos revitalizadores, de promover una identidad en base al sentimiento de cohesión grupal –desde familiar hasta nacional. Los testimonios otorgan a la lengua en cuestión un magnífico valor simbólico de vivencia y pertenencia.

El control cultural y la causa lingüística

Otro tema reflejado en los testimonios es la agencia que asumen los revitalizadores al asumir la lengua como responsabilidad propia despojándose del determinismo que suele escucharse cuando de procesos de desplazamiento lingüístico se habla:

Ma: Comencé a tener conciencia lingüística, entendí que la subsistencia de los idiomas indígenas dependerá de su uso en diferentes situaciones comunicativas, es decir dependerá de la práctica de sus propios hablantes, sobre todo en la familia, los hablantes debemos ser capaces de trasmitir la lengua a nuestros hijos.

Ep: Lograr revitalizar nuestras lenguas indígenas está en nuestras manos, en nuestro corazón, en nuestra voluntad, en nuestra actitud: no tendríamos que esperar leyes para hacerlo, claro que ayuda, pero no es lo esencial.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (188)

188 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Cha: Nosotros los padres somos los primeros culpables al no transmitirles nuestros conocimientos con ese orgullo que deberíamos.

Los revitalizadores cuestionan la fatalidad del desplazamiento de las lenguas minorizadas por la lengua hegemónica en la socialización infantil urbana. Se despojan de la idea de que no es un fenómeno natural, ni la lengua ni tampoco la transmisión de una lengua. Y es que asumieron que no se nace hablando una lengua, no se la “lleva en la sangre”, como se puede escuchar muchas veces con fervor esencialista. El otorgarle valor simbólico, identitario, patrimonial a la lengua presupone un sentido de propiedad que los hablantes tienen y que les faculta poder ‘hacer’ con la lengua y ‘decidir’ sobre ella. De esta forma, del discurso avanzan a la acción asumiendo una postura profundamente política coherente entre el decir y el hacer:

Ma: la mayoría de los profesionales, dirigentes guaraníes que viven en las ciudad de Camiri y en otros pueblos urbanos, siendo defensores de la cultura y la lengua guaraní no le hablan a sus hijos en guaraní y sus hijos ya son monolingües castellano, en algunos casos entienden pero no hablan la lengua.

Ru: Es la primera vez que se me presenta una oportunidad real de ser coherente con mi discurso. … oportunidad de poner en práctica con ella algo que siempre hablamos los académicos que apoyamos la EIB: fortalecer nuestra cultura. La lengua no lo es todo, pero es algo importante. Solo así podremos seguir con nuestro discurso porque fuimos capaces de hacerlo real en nuestras vidas.

Aportar al bienestar de la lengua y de la cultura con la propia acción en vez de demandar de otros lo que una o uno mismo no está dispuesto a dar y hacer se aprende, por ejemplo, en un programa universitario de postgrado que se adscribe a la pedagogía crítica:

Ep: Aprendí que de nada sirve lo que ‘decimos’ si no hay también un ‘hacemos’.

Ed: Mi formación académica en la maestría en el Proeib Andes, y mis lecturas relacionadas con políticas lingüísticas y mi posterior trabajo en la Universidad Pedagógica Mariscal Sucre de esta ciudad, más la experiencia de Rosario Saavedra, me generaron varias interrogantes ¿hasta cuándo seré coherente con mi discurso? ¿Hasta cuándo pediremos al “resto” de la gente que no permita que se muera nuestra lengua y no empezamos por nosotros mismos?

Ru: Pienso que al formar parte de un grupo de personas que apostamos por la EIB me toca la tremenda responsabilidad de mostrar en mi vida aquello que tanto se habla.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (189)

189INGE SICHRA

Ma: Yo quería comprobar si el hecho de que un niño naciera en un contexto monolingüe castellano era imposible que aprenda su lengua, y principalmente poner en práctica lo que a través de ideas discursivas venía pregonando: el fortalecimiento de uso de la lengua guaraní. Quería experimentar desde mi experiencia de madre guaraní, si esto funciona o no encontrándome o viviendo en una ciudad como es la ciudad de Camiri, un contexto castellano.

Es clara la expresión de la responsabilidad del líder, del académico, del profesional EIB de ser coherente con el discurso, de intervenir en la sociedad desde el espacio donde está para modificar las condiciones de dominación. Considero que los revitalizadores aquí presentados se aproximan a la figura de intelectuales orgánicos de Gramsci (1967).3 Y nos hace pensar en el objetivo que el paso por una academia intercultural cuestionadora, crítica y propositiva debería tener NO solamente tratándose del PROEIB Andes.

No es un trabajo fácil, sin embargo. Y si la primera socialización puede ser comúnmente considerada como un proceso predominantemente intuitivo de desarrollo del apego materno-infantil, en el caso de la acción política subyacente implica un arduo y conciente trabajo de resistencia y creación propio de la militancia:

Cha: No dejarse vencer por los obstáculos por muy difíciles que parezcan, porque si uno se lo propone, cree en ello y lucha por hacerlo lo logra.

Cha: Nunca bajar la guardia. Lo que quiere decir que, no debemos sentir que debemos relajarnos y dejar de hablar el quechua. Sino seguir hablando siempre.

Ep: Tengo que persistir en la ardua tarea y dar el ejemplo. Estas acciones pueden ser motivadoras para otras familias, en las que la lengua indígena se morirá con la mamá o con la abuela y tomen acciones para revitalizar su lengua indígena.

Ru: Pero pese a ese desanimo que en ocasiones siento, sigo con la lucha, porque para se ha convertido en eso, una lucha.

3 A diferencia de los intelectuales (tradicionales) portadores de la función hegemónica que ejerce la clase dominante en la sociedad civil, los intelectuales orgánicos se forman desde el grupo social emergente que lucha por conquistar la hegemonía política. Se definen por el lugar y la función que ocupan en el seno de una estructura social. La organicidad de los intelectuales se expresa por la conexión con el grupo social al cual se refieren. Otra característica de los intelectuales orgánicos es que operan tanto en la sociedad civil – el conjunto de los organismos privados en los cuales se debaten y se difunden las ideologías, como en la sociedad política o estado.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (190)

190 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Al leer estas declaraciones, estamos en el lindero de la “religiosidad” y la consiguiente “convicción” de las y los revitalizadores al comulgar con la lengua y luchar por esa “creencia” difundiéndola, dando el ejemplo. Por ella vale la pena luchar, ser inconformes, no instalarse en la tolerancia sino proceder al activismo y a la acción.

Apostar por el bilingüismo

El proceso desencadenado por la formación, investigación y experiencia profesional ha permitido entre los revitalizadores la toma de conciencia sobre la ideología lingüística imperante en situaciones de contacto de lenguas de estatuto asimétrico como es el caso de castellano-lenguas indígenas. Y es así que cuestionan el postulado generalizado y promovido en contextos de migración que hablar dos lenguas resta si una de ellas es indígena. Es central a esta acción revitalizadora la convicción que el bilingüismo tiene un valor positivo por el simple hecho aritmético de que uno más uno son dos y dos es más que uno.

Va: También se sabe que el aprendizaje y manejo de dos o más lenguas contribuye en el desarrollo de su inteligencia en tanto comprensión de visiones de mundo.

Ma: Experimento de volver a un niño bilingüe en un contexto monolingüe. Además, cuando la lengua del contexto marca el ambiente urbano.

Ru: Nuestro desafío es que pueda aprender hablar las dos lenguas (quechua castellano) si se puede otras lenguas más para que sea plurilingüe.

Esta apuesta al bilingüismo es directamente opuesta al propósito generalizado de querer evitar a los hijos el sufrimiento de hablar una lengua indígena que los padres habrían tenido (ocasionado por la discriminación lingüística). Para los revitalizadores, el real sufrimiento es no hablar ni escribir lengua indígena.

Ma: Mi fuerte motivación nació cuando estuve de Directora General en el Instituto Pluriétnico del Oriente y Chaco, actualmente Escuela Superior de Formación de Maestros, donde se forman maestros bilingües, en este espacio pude identificar y compartir con algunos estudiantes guaraníes que tenían muchos problemas para aprender, hablar y escribir su lengua.

Ed:¿mis hijos pasarán este “sufrimiento” o “frustración” cuando sean jóvenes igual que mis estudiantes (del Pedagógico que no dominan el quechua) incluso habiendo tenido madres y/o padres bilingües?

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (191)

191INGE SICHRA

Aún percibiendo el gran desafío de bilingüizar a los hijos con lenguas de estatus asimétrico y en un contexto donde predomina la lengua hegemónica, las madres apuestan a la fluidez de la lengua indígena y no se contentan con un bilingüismo incipiente o receptivo:

Cha: Desde que me propuse enseñar a mis hijos el quechua sabía que quería escucharles hablar y no solo entender o saber unas cuantas palabras en quechua”.

Ed: “Yo deseo con toda el alma que mi Adrianita de 10 años hable fluidamente la lengua quechua.

Planificaciónlingüísticadeyenlafamilia

Se percibe una certeza en cuanto a la pertinencia y centralidad del dominio familia en la política lingüística:

Ed: no hay política lingüística más efectiva que la de transmitir o enseñar la lengua a través de nuestra propia tradición aquí y ahora. Aún cuando agotemos todas las políticas lingüísticas, educativas, los recursos más tecnológicos y modernos más interesantes…(las lenguas) probablemente seguirán decayendo si los propios hablantes no les enseñamos a nuestros propios hijos a hablar nuestra lengua.

Tenemos ante nosotros un verdadero acto de planificación lingüística que busca provocar la modificación del comportamiento lingüístico -propio y del entorno. Tal como lo entiende Cooper (1997:60) “la planificación lingüística comprende los esfuerzos deliberados por influir en el comportamiento de otras personas respecto de la adquisición, la estructura o la asignación funcional de sus códigos lingüísticos”. Desde esta perspectiva, la primera y más importante medida de planificación es la adquisición, no la planificación de corpus ni de estatus. Claro que estos dos últimos niveles se vuelven importantes en la ejecución y en estrategias, por ejemplo, en el uso de términos propios o préstamos, uso en espacios públicos, espacios institucionales, etc. Pero el esfuerzo está en propiciar tiempos, herramientas, estrategias, medios, espacios aliados de la adquisición y el aprendizaje de lenguas indígenas.

Apoyándonos en Christian (1992: 237) es necesario mencionar los elementos clave para entender la definición de la planificación lingüística, los cuáles son: La planificación como una intervención: Cuando se habla sobre la planificación, se actúa sobre el curso normal de los acontecimientos para influir en el futuro de la lengua (proactiva antes que reactiva). Es explícita: Consiste en intentos conscientes de manipular el uso lingüístico. Esta característica se presenta cuando se habla de una planificación para la revitalización o mantenimiento de una lengua. Se orienta hacia un objetivo: La motivación que alienta los proyectos de planificación permanece vigente durante todo

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (192)

192 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

el proceso. Este elemento debe estar bien definido con base en la realidad lingüística. Es sistemática: Diseñar y coordinar una serie de actividades con las que afrontar estos problemas requiere un análisis cuidadoso de la situación y de cuáles son los resultados que se persiguen. Consiste en una elección entre las alternativas posibles: La planificación sólo es posible si existen distintas alternativas entre las que es posible elegir. Como ya hemos podido percibir en los testimonios anteriores y veremos en los siguientes, madres y padres revitalizadores son, de acuerdo al catálogo de Christian, perfectos planificadores lingüísticos.

Marcodeplanificaciónlingüísticadelasmadresypadres

Cada paso que asumen los revitalizadores puede ser comprendido como un andamiaje para alcanzar la meta trazada:

Ep: Que a pesar de muchas cosas, se puede hacer una planificación lingüística en la familia, si antes hay una conciencia de lealtad lingüística y de conciencia de herencia lingüística.Ruth: El enseñar la lengua a nuestros hijos requiere de una decisión fuerte, dura y de ser constantes, pues implica cambiar la lengua de comunicación habitual, y enfrentarse al entorno.

Ma: Así fue como comencé a prepararme desde el momento que estuve embarazada, comencé a hacer acuerdos, a su padre le dije que él le hable en castellano y que mi familia y yo le hablaríamos en guaraní, además que le pondría un nombre guaraní; aunque al principio lo tomaron como algo pasajero o ideas del momento”. Lo primero que hice desde los primeros días de nacimiento del Añemoti, fue acordar y consensuar con mi madre, mis hermanos y todos mis parientes de que nadie de los miembros de la familia debe hablarle en castellano a mi hijo, ya sea en diferentes espacios.

Ed: Tengo a la compañera de Adriana (mi hija), Belén, quien vive solo con la abuela: al ser esta última quechua hablante, ambas interactúan solo en esta lengua, aspecto de lo que se enteró mi hija y se vio motivada. Por tal situación, le pedí a Belén que a Adriana le hablara solo en quechua, demanda con la que Belén cumple firmemente, motivada al parecer por la misma situación que vio en mi familia.

“Intervencionista”, explícita, orientada a un objetivo, sistemática, con elección de alternativas, así es la planificación de los revitalizadores. El esfuerzo deliberado por influir en el comportamiento lingüístico de otras personas, como reza la definición de planificación lingüística antes mencionada requiere ingenio, creatividad, búsqueda de personas aliadas como ser las abuelas, vecinos, pero también mucha paciencia antes de lograr que se convenza la familia reacia a innovaciones lingüísticas, mucha capacidad de organización familiar.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (193)

193INGE SICHRA

Ma: El apoyo decidido de mi madre y mis hermanas fue determinante para que el Añemoti fortalezca día a día el aprendizaje y el uso del guaraní, ya que ellas están más tiempo con él, porque yo por motivo de trabajo estoy menos tiempo con él. Otra condición importante que ayudó es el contexto, mi comunidad, donde los primos (as) de su edad solamente hablan en guaraní, puesto que cada vez que hay posibilidad, principalmente en sus vacaciones lo llevamos a la comunidad, y es ahí donde fortalece su aprendizaje.

También es necesaria suficiente previsión a tiempo en un proceso único e irrepetible:

Ep: Debí haber hecho esto desde que mis hijas ya estaban en mi vientre; qué sencillo habría sido desde entonces.

La inmersión

La estrategia por excelencia es la inmersión, la condición básica de ello: la temporalidad y los interlocutores o cuidadores.

Ed: Hablarle, hablarle y hablarle... me acuerdo de mi formación en la maestria “input”.

Ma: Inmersión total, solo dirigirse en la lengua. Esto requería convencer a la familia y ganármela como aliada.

Cha: Exponerlos a la lengua usándola con ellos en todo tiempo y en todo lugar. El tiempo con el niño es crucial.

Ru: Atenderla 24 horas a la hija y utilizar todo el tiempo disponible de la crianza el quechua.

I: Si bien trabajaba, tenía siempre muy cerca de los niños porque creé una guardería en el mismo Instituto Alemán donde era directora. El tiempo libre que tenía lo pasaba ineludiblemente con ellos, los llevaba a conciertos, cine, . Como no tenemos familia en Cochabamba, no había a quién “encargarlos” únicamente por unas horas a la empleada en la casa. Es decir, fue una relación hijos-madre muy muy estrecha y permanente.

Ma: Al principio no fue fácil, principalmente mi madre no estaba de acuerdo que le hablemos solo en guaraní, argumentando que nació en la ciudad donde solamente se habla castellano y que cuando creciera y si asistía a uno de los colegios de Camiri sus compañeros se le burlarían. Tal vez fui muy dura con mi familia, para convencerle le tuve que decir que no quería que mi hijo aprendiera el castellano con interferencia y que tal vez se corra el riesgo de que no aprenda

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (194)

194 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

ni hable bien ninguna de las lenguas tanto el guaraní como el castellano. Entonces le pedí que mejor le hablen en una lengua que ellos manejan, hablan bien y esa lengua es el guaraní, y que de todas formas aprendería con facilidad el castellano porque vivimos en la ciudad, tendrá amigos del barrio y compañeros del colegio, en las calles y la televisión y otros medios de aprendizaje. Estos acuerdos tuvo buenos resultados, ya que desde los primeros días de nacimiento hasta en la actualidad, que el Añemoti ya cumplió 8 años, la familia guaraní solamente le hablamos en guaraní.

Más importante que los espacios de uso, para los revitalizadores es primordial el tiempo de uso en un ambiente de disfrute, lúdico, de canciones. No obstante, también es importante romper con la noción de encierro de la lengua al ambiente íntimo. El uso de la lengua indígena en la socialización en la ciudad es en todo lugar, ante cualquier público y dominio, o más bien dejando claro que la diada niño-madre es en sí el supradominio que no permite concesiones.

Restituir funciones afectivas, expresivas

¿Qué buscan los revitalizadores en primera instancia? ¡Establecer la función primaria de la lengua, dejarla instalada como natural, lengua default sin rastros de la noción de “normalización”! No se excluye el bilingüismo en el hogar como situación natural.

Algunos de los motores en este cometido:

Ed: Lo lúdico de la cultura y lengua meta. Afectividad en la competencia lingüística, gusto por la buena pronunciación.

Ch: “Lo afectivo, “dulce”, lo infantil del quechua”.

Ep: Volver funcional la lengua en la familia. Volverle a dar el valor comunicativo. Comencé a saludarlas y decirles cariñitos en quechua. Luego, empecé a lanzarles imperativos, pidiendo cosas o favores. Eso me resultó mucho, porque además acompañaba esos pedidos con gestos muecas y constantemente usaba las manos: lenguaje de manos. También me ayudó enseñarles canciones en quechua, y cantarlas con mis hijas. Estrategia gradual porque hijas ya no están en primera socialización.

I: A naturalizar el alemán en mi hogar sabiendo lo restringidas que eran las posibilidades de tener un entorno lingüísticamente favorable. A que los hijos se sintieran perfectamente cómodos con el alemán aunque el castellano estaba en cada resquicio, tanto fuera como también dentro de la casa. Tenía ya algunas alertas de otras señoras alemanas que se lamentaban que sus hijos no querían que ellas usaran su lengua de origen porque nadie a su alrededor lo hacía.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (195)

195INGE SICHRA

Ed: Al principio tenía la dificultad de olvidarme de hablarle en quechua a mi hija, una y otra vez debí recordar que todo debe ser en quechua. Es duro ser consecuente a veces, el peso o la “tasa” del castellano es más fuerte pero no más que la propia convicción.

¿Qué buscan los revitalizadores en primera instancia? Establecer la función primaria de la lengua, dejarla instalada como natural, lengua default sin rastros de la noción de “normalización”! No se excluye el bilingüismo en el hogar como situación natural.

Recursos y estrategias

Haber asumido la transmisión generacional de la lengua como un objetivo implicó, como ya lo dijimos antes, despojar el fantástico fenómeno de la adquisición lingüística de su condición de ‘proceso natural’. Todo lo contrario, en este caso es un proceso dirigido y planificado, para el cual los revitalizadores despliegan ingenio y creatividad:

Ed: Es interesante también “acercar” a Adriana aunque solo de manera receptiva y pasiva a los propios hablantes. Siempre que hay oportunidades involucro a mi hija en la circunstancia que se vive en ese momento.

Ch: Me las ingeniaba de una y mil maneras, como generar diálogos en quechua con otras personas, ya sea en la calle o en mi casa con mis familiares; darle tareas prácticas a Ricardo usando el quechua. Esto era, por ejemplo, cuando yo hacía algo, no dejaba que Ricardo estuviera sin hacer nada, le indicaba que hiciera algunas cosas porque sentía que mientras más participaba de la lengua Ricardo más rápido aprendería.

Ep: “Exposición en lugares públicos, demostrarlo ante la gente”.

I: La abuela, aunque lejana, fue una aliada ya que “recomponía” la lengua algo deteriorada de los niños cuando los recibía una vez al año por unas semanas. Ella enviaba paquetitos en los cumpleaños, fiestas y navidad con galletas, dulces, libritos y juguetitos “de Austria”, así siempre se renovaban la emociones con los orígenes.

Ru: Es necesario aprovechar los pocos espacios y oportunidades que aún persisten, aunque el tiempo es nuestro peor enemigo, pues habría que ir a los lugares donde se practica el quechua y hablar allá lo malo que esos espacios no siempre están cerca de nuestras casas o de nuestros trabajos.

Los revitalizadores estaban dispuestos a utilizar los recursos necesarios para sacar a la lengua de su estatus de minorización. Por otra parte, buscaron las oportunidades para hacerla audible y visible.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (196)

196 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Ch: Enfatizar el uso como estimulación temprana aún en lugares públicos. Hablarles de todo en quechua, por ejemplo, en el trufi explicarles lo que veían al pasar, traducirles los stickers de los trufis, generar diálogos de cualquier tema. Es decir no iba y no voy de callado en el trufi. Ni cuando andamos a pie, siempre hablamos. Y creo que por eso mi hijo menor, Santiago, habla bastante, casi nunca se queda callado.

I: Me junté periódicamente con un grupo de madres alemanas con hijos pequeños sabiendo que eso propiciaría una inmersión lingüística aunque sea por algunas horas.

Esta planificación de estatus necesariamente va acompañada de estrategias a nivel de corpus:

Ed: Usar una forma cercana a los usos y los objetivos que rodean al niño. No usar quechua puro, valerse de los castellanismos “arraigados” en el uso natural del quechua como “televisiontachu qhawachkanki?” ‘¿estas viendo tele?’ “Radiota apanpuway wawáy” ‘Hijita, anda y trae mi radio” funciona porque parte del enunciado le permite entender el todo.

I: Los rodeaba de música, videos, audio, juegos y material impreso infantil en alemán para que se familiarizaran con otras variedades, vocabularios, acentos. Quería que los niños se monitorearan y mejoraran la pronunciación y el nivel gramatical, ya que pensaba que corregirlos y marcar los errores iba a ser contraproducente y generar fastidio.

Ed: Es importante hacer querer la cultura, Adrianita es “querendona” de Luzmila Carpio y sus canciones, esta estrategia sirve para mejorar la pronunciación y simplemente sepa lo que esta cantando.

Satisfacción y reconocimiento en el camino

Alcanzar el objetivo de transmitir la lengua a los hijos y escuchar o verificar la adquisición exitosa en los mismos “sujetos” llena de alegría y disfrute a las madres revitalizadoras. Un motivo de satisfacción es constatar el grado de conciencia lingüística en los jóvenes hablantes, su competencia comunicativa y la actitud positiva hacia la lengua:

Ma: Lo más importante es que el Añemoti habla el guaraní en diferentes espacios con mucha seguridad, y de igual forma el castellano con las personas castellano hablantes, es decir que ya identifica con quienes debe hablar el guaraní y el castellano, cambia de código de comunicación sin mayor dificultad. Incluso él me controla y me cuestiona, por ejemplo, a veces le digo cierra la puerta, no me hace caso y se va, y le pregunto por qué no haces lo

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (197)

197INGE SICHRA

que te pido, me responde, ‘no hago porque estabas enojada’ o sea que cuando yo le hablo en castellano inmediatamente lo asocia con mi enojo o que estoy jugando.

Ch: Pienso que un gran logro es el hecho de que ellos dos ya hablan la lengua muy bien. Y como seguimos hablando en quechua, en todo lugar y en todo momento, la gente trata de acercarse a ellos y les hace hablar. Entonces, ellos hablan también con otras personas.

I: “Cuando Santiago a los 5 años me increpó en una conversación por teléfono (él en la casa, yo en Sucre) por qué le hablaba en castellano. Sentí una satisfacción enorme y alivio porque me dije: ya está, ya instalamos la lengua entre nosotros, y él hasta la reclama”.

Ep: Hablo en quechua delante de sus compañeras de cole. Las compañeras de mis hijas ya saben que hablo quechua y que mis hijas están en proceso de aprender. Cuando estamos en lugares públicos, a mis hijas les hablo en quechua y ellas, aunque en voz baja, ya me responde en quechua. Sin embargo, todavía nos falta trascender esa –no sé si es miedo- barrera. Después de todo, el tiempo que pasamos aprendiendo el quechua lo disfrutamos mucho.

Sorprendentemente, el entorno aplaude y admira a los niños urbanos hablantes de lengua indígena:

Ed: La mayor parte de la gente suele felicitarme incluso suelen reír los propios hablantes. En una ocasión en una librería nos ganamos un premio porque la dueña sintió emoción al escucharnos mientras buscábamos láminas de ciencias naturales.

Ch: Felizmente, no estamos solos tampoco en esta tarea, porque hay mucha gente que habla el quechua y se alegra mucho al escuchar que algunos niños hablen en esta lengua y lo aplauden y motivan a seguir haciéndolo.

Contrariando el prejuicio generalizado de que la lengua indígena dificulta el desempeño en la escuela, las madres hablan con orgullo de los beneficios del bilingüismo:

Ma: En la oralidad y la escritura le va muy bien en castellano. Confieso que me pasó algo muy curioso cuando su profesora de inglés (que no es la misma profesora de grado) me convoca a una reunión para informarme de su calificación me dice lo siguiente: ‘su hijito está muy bien en inglés, no tiene problema, tiene buena, a pesar de que habla guaraní’. Ese momento me contuve en responderle, pero sentí satisfacción personal que mi objetivo se estaba logrando.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (198)

198 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Ep: mi hija mayor, Valkiria, que desde inicio de año está llevando la materia de quechua en su colegio y le va muy bien, por cierto.

El reconocimiento de lo alcanzado se plasma también en adhesión del entorno y la disposición a seguir el ejemplo:

Ma: A sus compañeros comenzó a llamarles la atención y reclamar a sus padres que querían aprender guaraní igual que el Añemoti. Así, cuando asisto a la reunión de los padres de familia en el colegio, me preguntaban en qué instituto había aprendido el guaraní, y al explicarle que aprendió en casa, me pedían si el Añemoti podía recibir en casa a sus compañeros para jugar y enseñarles guaraní.

Ed: Deseo mostrar y reproducir esta experiencia con mis estudiantes de la Universidad Pedagógica, muchos de ellos padres y madres jóvenes que son bilingües o se encuentran en pleno proceso de aprendizaje del quechua como segunda lengua.

Ma: Esta experiencia personal y familiar me da una gran satisfacción, mayores elementos, fortaleza para seguir promoviendo el uso de la lengua guaraní y compartir con otras familias que están con este objetivo de mantenimiento y desarrollo de las lenguas indígenas.

Dificultadesydesafíos

Las dificultades, en primera instancia, se refieren a la propia exigencia de ser consecuente con el uso de la lengua:

Ru: En algunos momentos siento que el castellano me gana, pues cuando le hablo en quechua me contesta en castellano, y en esas ocasiones digo, ojalá por lo menos se le quede comprender el quechua.

Ed: “el uso de manera autónoma conforme crecen”.

Ch: Siempre el uso acostumbrado del castellano me perseguía. Es decir, que a pesar de proponerme hablar en quechua con mi primer hijo no pude hacerlo plenamente, porque una y otra vez me autosorprendía hablándole en castellano.

El desafío, en principio, no son los hijos, sino uno misma, el sometimiento al castellano de la familia y aún de los aliados. Además de mantener la comunicación con Ios hijos, también hay la dificultad de involucrar –o no- al cónyuge en la vida familiar:

Ep: Uuuuuuy, los obstáculos que tuve fueron varios. Primero, el padre de mis hijas no quería saber de que yo hable en quechua con mis hijas. Me cuestionaba del porqué enseñarles quechua a

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (199)

199INGE SICHRA

mis hijas; que era mejor que les enseñe inglés; que dónde les iba a servir el quechua; que desde que había entrado al PROEIB Andes me estaba volviendo ‘campesina’; que enseñar quechua era solamente para mi trabajo en la universidad; y otras ideas más groseras, también me dijo. Esa era mi primera lucha en mi casa. Luego, mi familia política, también me reclamaba cosas similares; incluso, hubo situaciones en las que hicieron llorar a mis hijas.

Ch: El segundo obstáculo fue mi esposo. Porque no quería escuchar el quechua en nuestro hogar y menos imaginarse a su hijo hablándolo frente a sus amigos”. Me queda el desafío, y creo el más difícil, que mi esposo hable en quechua con mis hijos.

I: Dudas del entorno familiar de mi esposo sobre la conveniencia de lo que hacía solamente me animaban más. Por lo demás, un hogar intercultural será muy rico pero no es nada fácil en la práctica. Se suscitan demasiadas veces barreras y situaciones de un ‘nosotros excluyente’ contrarias a la comunicación y cohesión familiar.

Un problema de las revitalizadoras es la débil o ausente comunidad de habla:

Ep: Lamentablemente, no tuve aliados porque no existe más gente a mi alrededor que hable quechua. Mi madre, que habla quechua, está en España desde hace diez años y es difícil que ella me apoye. A pesar de eso, cuando nos llama por teléfono, procuro que mis hijas hablen con ella en quechua.

En cuanto a la competencia comunicativa en los nuevos hablantes, no todo está en las manos de las madres, ya que la lengua establecida como propia en la diada madre-hijos pierde fuerza conforme crecen y se bilingüizan los hijos:

Ep: Que mis hijas sean las que inicien la conversación en quechua conmigo y no siempre yo, como hasta ahora lo he hecho.

I: Buscaba cómo defender la ‘lengua del hogar’ a partir del segundo hijo, porque entre hermanos hablan la lengua del entorno, de sus pares. Conforme pasan los años, la exposición a la lengua debería ser más regular para asegurar una competencia académica, pero las oportunidades de estar con ellos disminuyen, claro, el tiempo que pasamos juntos es cada vez menos, “interfiere” más la TV, los amigos, su tiempo libre. Es muy importante poder acompañar a cierta edad la estimulación con pares expertos. Y con educación formal.

Después de la etapa de adquisición, algunas madres revitalizadoras asumen el rol de alfabetizadoras debido a la ausencia de lengua indígena como primera lengua en el sistema educativo en contexto urbano.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (200)

200 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

Ed: La falta de contexto es una de las principales dificultades cuando el entorno es totalmente castellano hablante sobretodo en espacios de escolaridad en las ciudades, aunque exista predominancia de bilingüismo en el aula situación que es totalmente invisibilizada por todos los actores educativos.

Ma: Ahora nos encontramos en fase de lectura y escritura del guaraní, estoy aprendiendo a enseñar a leer y escribir, a través de materiales educativos producido en el PEIB y la Reforma Educativa, le va muy bien en la lectura, aunque la escritura le cuesta más a veces tiene confusión, porque confunde las letras del guaraní con el castellano y el inglés, pero avanza muy bien, pero en la oralidad y la escritura le va muy bien castellano.

Ch: Entre los desafíos que todavía me quedan son hacer que ellos también sean bilingües a nivel escrito en quechua. Es decir, que aún tengo el reto de enseñarles a leer y escribir a la par del castellano. Tarea que no termino de planificar y empezar plenamente.

La mayor dificultad, a todas luces, se presenta en la etapa de escolarización. La segunda socialización significa el límite de la construcción de un mundo hecho a medida de las convicciones y posibilidades de las madres y padres como planificadores lingüísticos en la familia. Se inicia el periplo de la educación formal, en el cual los padres buscan la comprensión y el apoyo de los docentes para el caso (inaudito) de los “niños urbanos monolingües en lengua indígena”, temiendo, además, el discrimen por parte de los compañeros. Los casos referidos dejan ver cuán lejos están las escuelas fiscales, sus directores y docentes, sobre todo, de estar preparadas o dispuestas a aceptar la condición intercultural y plurilingüe de los alumnos. Son las escuelas privadas las más receptivas:

Ma: Lo más interesante es el hecho de que en su colegio conocen que él es guaraní y habla guaraní. Eso está incidiendo en el interés o motivación de sus compañeros de colegio para aprender guaraní, inclusive algunos profesores tienen interés de aprender el guaraní para atender a niños como el Añemoti.

Y al Estado, ¿qué le compete hacer?

El Estado, más aún el boliviano actual, es masculino, autoritario, jerárquico, hom*ogeneizador, prescriptivo, es el debe, regulador, burocrático por excelencia. No estamos frente a un Estado protector. Por contraposición, una revitalización en el hogar apela a la función afectiva, la raíz, lo maternal o paternal crianza, cuidador, el disfrute, formar la personalidad y autestima, continuidad. Es una expresión de libertad, de autonomía, del nosotros.

El Estado no debe entrar al hogar, ni revitalizar. Pero como el Estado está llamado a intervenir…Una tarea que le compete es promover el

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (201)

201INGE SICHRA

bilingüismo. Hacer del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia un estado plurilingüe. La vulnerabilidad de las lenguas se da porque los hablantes sienten que su lengua los discrimina. Porque ya no “tiene función o sentido en estos tiempos”. Quieren borrar el rastro de la lengua en el afán de borrar rastros de identidad cultural que perjudique a los niños en su avance social en general y en el aprendizaje de castellano en particular. Si la escuela garantizara el castellano a todos quienes ingresan a la escuela, no habría la aprehensión de los padres y no asumirían ellos la castellanización a costa de desplazar su lengua del hogar y la comunidad. Es una huida o negación pública que se vuelve más y más en huida y negación en el hogar por apostar al castellano como única herramienta.

Quienes son bilingües tienen la opción de escoger qué lengua utilizar en la socialización primaria. Es la opción, la posibilidad de escoger que empodera y vuelve creativo. De allí viene el reconocimiento del bilingüismo como enriquecimiento, no como empobrecimiento y marca de pobreza. Por eso las madres del proyecto, bilingües, optan por la lengua indígena, no se ven obligadas. En este sentido, los migrantes son la población bilingüe por excelencia en área urbana que valdría la pena estimular. Migrantes que se vuelven agentes de revitalización. ¿Cómo? ¿Qué les provoca? Hemos visto respuestas que tienen que ver con el nosotros, con la resistencia, con la conciencia y reflexividad, con la opción, con el poder de la agencia- intelectuales orgánicos que se afirman en una ciudadanía intercultural.

El Estado se puede ocupar de que los niños que llegan con lengua indígena a la escuela –en área rural o en área urbana, y en este caso, con énfasis en área urbana, sean bienvenidos y no menospreciados, el ámbito del estado es la segunda socialización, la escuela. Formar docentes, tener currículo en respuesta a la plurinacionalidad, multiculturalidad, multilingüismo. El estado debe ocuparse de institucionalizar el bilingüismo en sus entidades, en la administración, en la gestión. El presidente audiblemente bilingüe, el Vicepresidente ---no solamente porque lo dice la Constitución, o ¿quizás justamente por eso no se bilingüizan públicamente? Empezar con el ejemplo. Fomentar la escuela bilingüe y no la escuela castellanizante. Esto va de la mano con la formación docente.

Urge un fuerte apoyo del Estado, no solo económico sino sobre todo político. Recuperando el hecho que lengua es cultura, el Estado debe “definir una política de fomento, promoción y protección de las lenguas”, con lo cual estaría fomentando, promocionando y protegiendo su identidad plurinacional. La diversidad es la clave del desarrollo y lo indígena no es una garantía de la pluralidad, la garantía está en la apertura de oportunidades, sin discriminar a ninguna de las diversas maneras y formas de expresiones lingüísticas, sean éstas de tipo generacional, regional, cultural.

Parafraseando a quienes están proponiendo el proyecto de Ley del Cine y Audiovisual (2013), la pluralidad cultural es la mayor riqueza de Bolivia. Sin embargo, las lenguas (los propulsores del proyecto de ley hablan de ‘pantallas de cine’) están secuestradas por la pereza, el conformismo, el facilismo, la

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (202)

202 CRIANZA BILINGÜE DE NIÑOS INDIGENAS URBANOS...

copia y traducción, el formalismo, y así, en una espiral de situaciones, donde prima la desidia o la economía cuando se trata de cultura. Hace falta que se anteponga el interés público, que ése sea de prioridad estatal.

El arte (y la cultura) requiere de una cosa trascendental para desarrollarse: libertad. Y puede tratarse de un tema trascendental o no, la misión del Estado en todas sus reparticiones es permitir la libre y total expresión de todos y cada uno de sus ciudadanos. (Calasich 2013:s.n)

Bibliografía

Bonfil Batalla, G. (1988). La teoría del control cultural en el estudio de los procesos étnicos. Anuario Antropológico 86, Universidades de Braslia/

Tempo Brasilero, 13-53.Calasich, R. (2013) “Sobre el Proyecto de Ley del Cine y Audiovisual”, Diario

Los Tiempos 26.1.13.Chi, H. (2011) La vitalidad del Maaya T’aan: Estudio etnográfico de la

comunicación intergeneracional de los mayas de Naranjal Poniente. La Paz: UMSS, FUNPROEIB Andes, Plural.

Christian, D. (1992). La planificación de las lenguas desde el punto de vista de la lingüística en F. Newmeyer (comp.) Panorama de lingüística

moderna de la Universidad de Cambridge. Vol VI. (pp. 233-252). Madrid: Visor.

Cooper, R. (1997). La planificación lingüística y el cambio social. Madrid: Cambridge University Press.

Eriksen, T.H. (1991). Languages at the margins of modernity. Linguistic minorities and the nation-state. Oslo: PRIO.

Eriksen, T.H. (2002). Ethnicity and Nationalism. Sterling, VA: Pluto Press.Fishman, J. (1991). Language and Ethnicity. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: J.

Benjamins. Giroux, H. (1992). Teoría y resistencia en educación. México D.F.: Siglo XXI

Editores. Gramsci, A. (1967). La formación de los intelectuales. México: Grijalbo.Janks, H. y R. Ivenic. (1992). CLA and emancipatory discourse en N. Fairclough

(ed.) Critical Language Awareness (pp. 305-331). New York: Longman Publishing.

Van den Berghe, P. (1975) Ethnicity and Class in Highland Peru en L.A. Després (org.) Ethnicity and Resource Competition in Plural Societies (pp.71- 85). La Haya: Mouton.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (203)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (204)

CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED?THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE REVITALIZATION

OF AN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE

Yamina EL Kirat El Allame & Yassine Boussagui

Summary: Amazigh, the indigenous language of Morocco hitherto marginalized, has been subject to the vagaries of policies in an attempt to revitalize it, starting with its introduction in education in 2003 and culminating in its recognition as an official language in 2011. The challenge for Amazigh, however, remains not to compete successfully with the major dominant languages existing in the country (Arabic and French) but to find spaces where it could steep through into the consciousness of Moroccans and be accepted not as a dialect but rather as a language that can fulfil the new functions bestowed upon it in the domains of education, training, media and modern cultural production. The aim of this paper/chapter is to describe and explore the changes in the status and corpus planning of Amazigh and examine the major hindrances that stand in the way of a real revitalization of Amazigh in Morocco. Further, the chapter explores the role the Amazigh language and culture can play in the sustainable development of Amazigh regions mostly affected by economic fragility and poverty.

Keywords: Amazigh, Indigenous language, Language revitalization, Sustainable development.

¿PUEDE SALVARSE EL AMAZIGH? LAS IMPLICACIONES DE LA REVITALIZACIÓN DE UNA LENGUA INDÍGENA

Resumen: El amazigh, lengua indígena de Marruecos y hasta el momento, lengua minorizada, ha sido objeto de caprichos políticos en un intento de revitalizarlo, empezando por su introducción en

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (205)

205YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

la educación en 2003 y terminando por su reconocimiento como lengua oficial en 2011.

El desafío para el amazigh, sin embargo, no consiste en competir con éxito con las grandes lenguas dominantes que existen en el país (árabe y francés) sino en encontrar los espacios en donde pueda encaramarse/abrir camino dentro de las conciencias de los marroquíes y ser aceptada no como un dialecto sino como una lengua que puede satisfacer las nuevas funciones que se le otorgan en los ámbitos de la educación, la formación, los medios de comunicación y la producción cultural moderna.

El objetivo de este capítulo consiste en describir y explorar los cambios de estatus y de planificación de corpus del amazigh y analizar los obstáculos mayores a los que se enfrenta en el camino de la revitalización real del amazigh en Marruecos. Además, en este capítulo se explora el rol que la lengua y cultura amazigh puede jugar en el desarrollo de las regiones amazigh, fundamentalmente afectadas de fragilidad económica y pobreza.

Palabras clave: Amazigh, lengua indígena, revitalización lingüística, desarrollo sostenible.

Introduction

Amazigh1 or Berber , the indigenous language of North Africa in general and Morocco in particular (Ayache, 1964; Laroui, 1977; Chafik, 1982), has for long been confined to the private space. It has “suffered the fate of so many minority languages around the world, despised as the language of backward peasants and marginalized in modern society” (Marley, 2004, p.27). Recently, however, the Amazigh language has acquired some legitimacy, especially since its official recognition by the state as one of the main components of the Moroccan identity, its partial introduction at school and in the Media and its establishment as the second official language of the country in the new Moroccan Constitution since 2011. Although this upsurge interest in Amazigh language and culture is often argued to be symbolic (Errihani, 2007; Buckner, El Kirat & Boussagui, 2018) and subject to the ‘economics of the linguistic market’ (Hornberger, 2008), one cannot underrate the undeniable positive measures that have been taken in order to maintain the Amazigh language in Morocco and the ensuing positive changes in the status and corpus of Amazigh.

1 See Boukous (1995, p.18) for more on the justification for adopting Amazigh rather than Berber to refer to the varieties spoken by the first inhabitants of North Africa.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (206)

206 CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED? THE IMPLICATIONS...

Amazigh is a Hamito-Semitic language (Cohen, 1947; Basset, 1952). It spreads from the Oasis of Siwa in Egypt through Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria, and through the Sahara Desert into Mali and Niger. It is, however, in Morocco and Algeria that the Amazigh speaking population is most important. Estimating the number of Amazigh speakers in Morocco is like treading on thin ice as it is a highly contested political issue rather than a linguistic one. The exact figures are impossible to come by given that the censuses do not take the linguistic dimension into consideration. In the absence of exact figures, some linguists claim that almost half of the Moroccan population speak Amazigh (Boukous, 1995; Ennaji, 1997; Sadiqi, 1997). Yet, currently the numbers of monolingual Amazigh speakers are decreasing due to Amazighs’ migration to the city and the policies of cultural and linguistic assimilation propagated over the years through the Arabization policy (Ennaji, 2005; El Kirat 2008). The 2014 census, for example, estimates the speakers of Amazigh to be 26.7%.2

Amazigh in Morocco is divided into three main varieties, which are classified into three main language areas: Tashelhit, Tarifit, and Tamazight. Tashelhit is the variety used in the High Atlas, Anti-Atlas Mountains in Southern Morocco. Tarifit is spoken in the Rif Mountains in the North; as for Tamazight, it is used in the middle Atlas and the Eastern half of the High Atlas Mountains. This division has been questioned by some Moroccan scholars as it is geographically based and does not include some varieties which do not fall in any of these language areas (El Kirat, 1997, 2001, 2004). The geographical distance and the lack of contact between the different groups over the centuries have contributed to a decrease in mutual intelligibility between the speakers of these varieties, a fact that has further complicated the revitalization processes and cultivated the ‘dialectalization’ discourse around Amazigh which has in turn engendered negative attitudes towards the language. The rhetoric has always been that Amazigh is only a dialect and that a dialect has no place in the official domains. Furthermore, the implementation of the Arabization policy coupled with institutional marginalisation, urbanisation, and competition with stronger, more prestigious languages such as Standard Arabic and French have reduced Amazigh to the peripheries and have resulted in a situation of attrition and precariousness (EL Kirat, 2004, 2008a/b, 2009, 2010a/b/c; Boukous, 2011) and an overall lower status in the Moroccan linguistic market.

Changes to Amazigh status:

The 20 August 1994 official speech by late Hassan II stands as the turning point in the history of the language as it put an end to the decades of the State’s marginalization and exclusion of the language. Later, Amazigh was recognized as a national language on July 30, 2001, and IRCAM was established in October of the same year with the aim to protect the Amazigh

2 These figures can be questioned, for the question used does not refer to the mother tongue but to the dialect (lahja) which speakers use in their everyday life.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (207)

207YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

language and culture and work its maintenance and revitalization. This has, indeed, marked the dawn of the Amazigh language revival and heralded the beginning of the end of the years of neglect and disregard to the language and culture in the official discourse. The King Mohammed VI’s speech of July 30, 2001 announced a change in the status of Amazigh in Morocco qualifying the Amazigh language and culture as a “principal component of the Moroccan identity” and which should be preserved and promoted for its being a “national heritage of all Moroccans”. Another important instance in the change in the official attitudes towards Amazigh at the institutional level is the creation by a Royal decree of 17 October, 2001 of the Royal Institute of the Amazigh Culture (IRCAM) with an official mandate “to propose appropriate measures and policies to safeguard and promote the Amazigh culture in all its expressions” (Royal Decree n° 1–01–299, 2001). The speech and the Dahir (decree) are the founding texts that legitimize Amazigh demands as they grant legitimacy to the linguistic and cultural Amazigh components in Morocco. The King seemed to have changed the general tendency towards the Amazigh language and culture; he has “single-handedly altered the nation’s language policies [by] expressing sentiment counter to the country’s official policy of Arabisation” (Buckner, 2006). The introduction of Amazigh at school in September 2003 contributed to the valorization of the language and helped it acquire some legitimacy. The break up with the old apathetic policies, through the creation of IRCAM, the teaching of the language and the recognition of Amazigh as a national language, paved the way for its incorporation in public schools and culminated in its recognition as an official language on March 9, 2011. The officialization of Amazigh as is declared in article 5 of the 2011 constitution: “Amazigh [language] constitutes an official language of the State, being common patrimony of all Moroccans without exception” (Moroccan Const. art 5, 2011), is hoped to represent the institutionalisation mechanism through which the revalorisation of the language, culture, and Amazigh identity is proliferated. The new de jure policy status of Amazigh is also hoped to contribute to the change in the negative attitudes accompanying the incorporation of Amazigh in the education system.

Changes to Amazigh corpus:

The Safeguarding, promotion and strengthening of the position and status of Amazigh in education, society and the media were the major priority tasks entrusted to IRCAM in order to enable the Amazigh language to serve the new functions assigned to it. To do this, IRCAM had first needed to change the status of the language from an oral medium to a written one, adopt a writing system and work on the standardization of the existing varieties and the development of a standard Amazigh language.

Script normalization:

Amazigh has always been an oral language and has always been used in oral communication given the absence of a standard script and orthography.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (208)

208 CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED? THE IMPLICATIONS...

It is not until 1960s that the Amazigh Cultural Movement started to make use of the Tifinagh script as a symbol of Amazigh cultural and linguistic identity. The Tifinagh script is an old phonogrammatic writing system found in North Africa; it is thought to have descended from the Libyco-Berber alphabet which was produced from at least the fourth century BC (Brett & Fentress, 1996). The ‘Academie Berbère’ in Paris revived the script and propagated the ‘neo-Tifinagh’ script throughout North Africa where magazines such as Amazigh and Tifinagh made use of it (Bounfour, 2003; Ennaji, 2005). It is, however, the institution of Tifinagh alphabet as a script for Amazigh and its codification by IRCAM in 2003 that heralded the shift from the orality tradition to a standard form of writing at least in the Moroccan context. The decision was not without controversy since the debate that preceded the adoption of Tifinagh was ideological and politically driven. Three orientations were contested: the Arabic orientation that sought the imposition of the Arabic script as the medium of writing the Amazigh language; the Latin script orientation and finally the Tifinagh orientation which prevailed in the end after a Royal intervention.

Although the Royal decision was considered ‘a good political solution to the dilemma concerning which script to use’ by both Amazighohones and Arabophones (Ennaji, 2003), it did not make unanimity among the scientific community and the activists alike. Salem Chaker criticised the swift political decision to adopt Tifinagh without any solid and rigorous scientific debate. He considers the decision to be

“…a hasty and badly founded decision, and certainly a dangerous one for the future and development of Tamazight in Morocco. It also shows very clearly the confusion among those who are in charge of the Amazigh language in the North African countries. While no serious scientific debate on the question of the alphabet to use ever took place in Morocco or Algeria, the political leaders decided on an option that is totally disconnected from the current practice, both in Morocco and in the rest of the Amazigh world. Currently, as you know, the most functional Amazigh writing system is Latin character based. In Morocco, it is seconded by the Arabic character based alphabet. (Salem Chaker, 2004)

Be it as it may, Tifinagh came to be adopted as the official script for the writing of the Amazigh language. The task of standardizing the spelling was carried by IRCAM with a view to incorporate it in education, the media and public life. The development of a unified Tifinagh script called ‘Tifinaghe-Ircam’ followed four principles: historicity, univocity, simplicity and economy. Historicity pertains to the authenticity of graphemes; therefore, the oldest alphabets are preferred to new ones. As for univocity, it requires that each grapheme corresponds to one sound. Simpler graphemes are preferred to those comprising more than one element; finally, the economy principle stipulates that the graphemes with satisfying gain/cost ratio in terms of design and efficiency are adopted. The standard Tifinagh-ircam alphabet has

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (209)

209YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

33 graphemes; 27 of which are consonants, 2 are semi-consonants and 4 are vowels (See Boukous, 2011 on the codification of the alphabet).

Standardization:

The standardization process has as its main objective to turn Amazigh into a uniform language common to all Amazigh regions, that is functional and accessible and that meets the needs of its users in communication situations imposed by modern life (Boukous, 2011). The dialectalisation nature of Amazigh, however, proved to be a challenge, especially since dialectal diversity has always been seen as an obstacle to the elaboration of an Amazigh uniform norm. Yet, of the many alternatives proposed to solve the issue of standardization, all Amazighs agree that the imposition of one variety over the others is not democratic and exposes to the risks of engendering internal conflicts among the Amazigh community (Ameur, 2009; El Kirat & Bennis, 2010). Furthermore, a standardized norm which epitomises the sum of all the local varieties was also rejected as it can alienate the speakers by creating ‘un mélange hybride’ (ibid.), which could further sow dissension over the whole project. On that account Galand (1989) attests that ‘il serait encore plus utopic de vouloir créer – ou recréer – un berbère commun à partir de l’ensemble des parlers: le jeu pourrait amuser un linguiste, mais n’irait pas au-delà’ (p. 350, quoted in Ameur, 2009).

The alternative, argues Ameur (2009), should take into account the unity of the Amazigh language but also its diversity and should proceed progressively and convergently to a standardisation from the geolects, which would lead, in the long run, to a common uniform language. This view makes use of the theory of ‘polynomic languages’ originally developed by Marcellesi (1983) with regard to Corsican language, but was later extended to other minority language varieties. Within the polynomic view, dialectal differences raise no barrier to a language’s unity as it highlights a once concealed ‘regular dialectal continuum’ (Thiers, 1993) that guarantees a degree of inter-comprehension between the different varieties. The standardization of Amazigh therefore entails a pluralistic model whereby ‘les usages pluriels’ and the dialectal regional specificities are integrated without excluding ‘la conformité au système de la langue (Ameur, 2009, p.80).

The standardisation is to be achieved in two stages; the first one corresponds to the intrageolectal – normalisation – standardization of the linguistic situation in each of the main language areas. An approach which is hoped will maintain and reinforce the continuity of the regional varieties in order to ensure “les conditions de la sécurité linguistique et culturelle des communautés regionales” (Boukous, 2004, p.18). The second stage involves intergeolectal standardization whereby the process serves to create a Pan-Amazigh (Ibid.) standardized norm where phonological, morphological and lexical differences are allowed to coexist temporarily. The task should, however, lead in the long run, as Boukous notes, to a management of divergences which would eliminate the linguistic discrepancies either by integrating them

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (210)

210 CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED? THE IMPLICATIONS...

into the standard language as competing structures whose survival depends on competition or by deciding drastically to retain certain forms and reject others.

At the operational level, a polynomic conception of Amazigh makes educating young people in their mother tongue with its regional specificities possible. Ameur (2009) argues that depending on the region where the pupil is found, care will be taken to ensure the continuity, or at least a smooth flexible transition between the language of his environment and the language in which he will be taught in the classroom. Accordingly, the course books at the level of the first classes (grades 1 and 2) are in the regional mother tongue of the pupil, but progressively aspects from other varieties are integrates so as to build awareness around the plurality of Amazigh and eventually, little by little introduce the standardized form in an approach known as ‘une didactique plurinormaliste’ (Marcellesi and Treignier 1990, in Ameur, 2009).

The challenges:

Among the many challenges the Amazigh language revitalization process/policy is facing, the constitutional ambiguity continues to be the one with the ever lasting effects on the future of Amazigh (See El Kirat & Boussagui, 2018). A national constitution is the highest example of a public official text where language policies are outlined. A national constitution regulates language use, mandates functional allocations of a language and/or provides guidelines that define the national and official languages. As with the previous constitutions (1962 and 1996), the 2011 has outlined the proclamations delineating the language policy of the country. Article 5 of the new constitution names Arabic and Amazigh as the two official languages of Morocco

“Arabic remains [demeure] the official language of the State. The State works for the protection and for the development of the Arabic language, as well as the promotion of its use. Likewise, Tamazight [Berber/amazighe] constitutes an official language of the State, being a common patrimony of all Moroccans without exception. An organic law defines the process of implementation of the official character of this language, as well as the modalities of its integration into teaching and into the priority domains of public life, so that it may be permitted in time to fulfill its function as an official language.”

A textual analysis, however, of the Article remains crucial to cogently delineate the status and functions allocated to Amazigh in the new constitution. The first thing that appears when investigating the wording of Article 5 is the preamble “Arabic is ‘demeure / remains / ىقبت ’ the official language of the state’’. The use of the word ‘demeure’ could be interpreted in a way that it signifies the continuity of the privileged status conferred to Arabic since the independence. The preamble clearly sets out not to redefine the status of

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (211)

211YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

the existing languages in Morocco, but to consolidate the status of Arabic as the official language of the state. Something that can easily be seen in the use of the definite determiner ‘the’ to modify the official status of Arabic and the use ‘an’ – the indefinite article – to modify Amazigh which according to Boukous can be interpreted as meaning a language among others “peut être interprété comme signifiant une langue parmi d’autre” (2013, p. 17). It cannot be ignored, therefore, that article 5 confers a notion of a singularity to Arabic and sustains a hierarchical status of the languages of Morocco where Arabic is the primary official language and Amazigh is secondary.

Another important aspect of the article, which strengthens our interpretation is the State responsibility toward these languages. Concerning Arabic, the state “works for its protection and for its development, as well as the promotion of its use”. This prescription of the State’s responsibilities towards Arabic contrasts sharply with its orientations towards the protection of Amazigh as it ties the fate and future of the Amazigh language to organic laws that have not yet seen light seven years after the officialization of the language.

Also important is the absence of any specification as to what variety the term ‘Arabic’ refers. It is not clear whether the generic term refers to MSA or CA and whether or not it encompasses MA, known as Darija, as well. This confusion, which was created after the independence and which is still sustained by the current constitution posits Amazigh in competition not only with CA and MSA but also with MA. The perpetuation of this ambiguity in the formulation of article 5 legitimizes, to some extent, the use of MA in domains that should have been reserved for the two official languages. We can even go further and argue that the formulation deliberately favours Arabic and operates in a way to safeguard the alleged superiority of Arabic and its varieties and protect them at the expense of Amazigh. This ambiguity is furthered by the continuous delay in passing the organic law relative to the implementation of officialization of the Amazigh language. The constitution promised the promulgation of an organic law that ‘defines the process of implementation of the official character of Amazigh, as well as the modalities of its integration into teaching and the priority domains of public life, so that it may be permitted in time to fulfill its function as an official language’ (Article 5, 2011 Constitution). Indeed, the delay could not have been without implications on multiple sectors, the most important of which are education and the sustainable development of Amazigh regions.

Sustainable development and Amazigh

One of the most important but neglected aspect in the revitalization process of the Amazigh language remains its potential economic benefits for the local communities. Since the early 2000, there has never been any consideration of the impact the revitalization of Amazigh can have on the day to day lives of its speakers. The state has for years dissociated the Amazigh language and culture from regional development projects and strategies

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (212)

212 CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED? THE IMPLICATIONS...

and have sidelined and ignored the linguistic and cultural resources as most African states (Noah, 1999; 2003) contrary to the recommendations of the United Nations. In fact, these resources have often been regarded as an obstacle to regional and state development. Research, however, has demonstrated that economic and sustainable development can be achieved when the human capital is taken into account (Djité, 2008; Stroud, 2002). Djité argues that “no matter how one defines development it cannot be achieved without reference to language as an important factor, and real development is not possible in Africa without the integration of all her human capital’ (quoted in Okafor & Noah, 2014, p. 275). Accordingly, creating sustainable opportunities for Amazigh regional development can only be achieved if the indigenous communities take an active role in defining and interacting with those strategies. Yet, active participation of local communities in regional development can be attained when communication is effective. That is, local mobilization cannot happen using an alien language indigenous communities do not speak or do not fully understand. Experiences from the field reveal that Amazigh regions suffer from high rates of illiteracy and ignorance.

Research reveals that education of minority groups can contribute in many ways to sustainable development. It can help them improve their agricultural productivity, the status of women, and motivate family planning so as to decrease population growth rates, encourage the environmental protection, and ameliorate the standard of living.

Involvement in sustainable development should start with the discussion of the issue in the minority group language, and within the community’s own cultural and social structures.

Given the vital role of education in sustainable development, minority groups should have access to it. Adults literacy and lifelong education programmes, for instance, in mother tongues can also develop awareness and motivate involvement in the action. Sustainable Development in local languages allows stakeholders to learn about the community issues and take action on sustainability issues.

Language documentation is also a key step for the reinforcement of local communities and their engagement in development issues. Through language documentation, local communities, often working with researchers, discover and record endangered cultural, environmental and other forms of their local knowledge. This process strengthens the self-esteem of the people in marginalized groups, enhances their awareness of their shared historical knowledge systems, and its valorisation.

The way forward, then, is an Amazigh-based multilingual education where multilingual communicative competences are strengthened. Something that could allow local community residents to access information and harness technological knowledge that could alleviate the socio-economic realities of their communities. In so doing, indigenous Amazigh communities would not only be given the necessary tools to maintain and transmit their traditional knowledge and know-how but would also be well equipped to fight and reduce

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (213)

213YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

the disastrous impact of climate change that most often affect indigenous peoples and have negative effects on the social, economic and cultural aspects of their lives (Magni, 2017).

Conclusion

It our conviction that schools alone are not enough to ensure a successful revitalization of a threatened language as Amazigh especially in light of the decrease in the number of schools where Amazigh is being taught and the failure of the state to draft the organic laws promised in the constitution. The survival of Amazigh in the new millennium can only be achieved if the situation of attrition and precariousness Amazigh has experienced for decades (EL Kirat, 2004; Boukous, 2011) is addressed in a holistic approach subsuming the linguistic, the political and especially the economic benefits of the revitalization on the Amazigh communities. The revitalization of Amazigh has to be tied to the economic and sustainable development of Amazigh regions and has to be employed as the main medium for that development. Amazigh revitalization should absolutely take into consideration the pragmatic reasons that have led the Amazigh communities to give up the transmission of their language so as to reverse the tide of shift and motivate people to learn and protect the language. Revitalization should also include the economic and social conditions the Amazigh communities are living in. The revitalization of Amazigh should go hand in hand with the sustainable development of the Amazigh regions. Language is a means of communication. When a minority community’s language is excluded from official communication, the whole community is excluded and the development process is hindered in the whole society.

References

Ameur, M. (2009). Aménagement linguistique de l’amazighe: pour une approche polynomique. Asinag, 3, 75-88.

Ayache, A. (1964). Histoire Ancienne de l’Afrique du Nord. Paris: Editions Sociales. Basset, A. (1952). La langue berbère. London: International

African Institute.Boukous, A. (1995). The Berber language: Maintenance and shift. International

Journal of the Sociology of Language, 112, 9–28.Boukous, A. (2011). Revitalizing the Amazigh Language – Stakes, Challenges

and Strategies. Rabat: L’Institut Royal de la Culture Amazigh Publishing. Retrieved from www.ircam.ma/sites/default/files/doc/diversBoukous_droit_ling2016.pdf

Boukous, A. (2012). Revitalisation de l’amazighe: Enjeux et stratégies. Rabat: L’Institut Royal de la Culture Amazigh Publishing.

Boukous, A. (2003). La standarisation de l’amazighe: quelques prémisses. In standardisation de l’amazighe. Actes du séminaire organise par le

centre de l’Amenagement Linguistique Sous la direction de Ameur, M. & Boumalk, A. Rabat: EL Maârif Al Jadida, pp. 11-22.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (214)

214 CAN AMAZIGH BE SAVED? THE IMPLICATIONS...

Boukous, A. (2013). L’officialisation de l’amazighe: enjeux et strategies. Asinag, No. 8, pp.15-34.

Bounfour, A. (2003). La situation Actuelle de l’Amazigh au Maroc. In the Moroccan Francophone daily Le Matin, 25 octobre 2003.

Brett, M. & Fentress, E. (1996). The Berbers. MA, USA: Blackwell Publishing.Buckner, E. (2006). Language drama in Morocco: Another perspective on the problems and prospects of teaching Tamazight. The Journal of North

African Studies, 11(4), 423– 433.Chafik, M. (1982). Pour l’élaboration du berbère ‘Classique’ à partir du berbère

courant. In Actes de la 1ère Rencontre de l’Université d’Eté d’Agadir (pp. 191–197). Agadir: Publications of the Association l’Université d’Eté.

Cohen, D. (1947). Essai comparatif sur le vocabulaire et la phonétique du chamito-sémitique. Paris: Honoré Champion.

Djité, P. G. 2008. The Sociolinguistics of Development in Africa. Clevedon, Buffalo, Toronto: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

El Kirat, Y. (1997). Some Causes of the Beni Iznassen Berber Language Loss in Langues et Stigmatisation Sociale au Maghreb. Peuples

Méditerranéens N° 79, Avril-Juin 1997. pp.35-53.El Kirat, Y. (2001). The Current Status and Future of the Amazigh Language in the Beni Iznassen Community in Languages & Linguistics. N° 8,

2001. pp. 81-95.El Kirat, Y. (2004). The lexical and morphological structure of the Beni Iznassen

Amazigh El language in a context of language loss. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation), University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

El Kirat El Allame Y. (2008a). Bilingualism, Language Teaching, Language Transmission and language Endangerment: The case of Amazigh in Morocco. In Endangered Languages and Language Learning, Fryske Academy, It Aljemint, Ljouwert/Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, 2008, pp.123-130. http://www.ogmios.org/conferences/2008/proceed2008.htm

El Kirat El Allame Y. (2008b). Language Perdition and Revival: The Case of the AmazighLanguage in Morocco. In Belghazi, T. Ezroura, M. R. Judy

(Eds). Who Can Act for the Humans? Eds. Publications of the Faculty of Letters & KonradAdenauer Stiftung. ((2008), pp. 85-108. Page 20 sur 44.

El Kirat, Y. & Salem M. (2009). North Africa and the Middle East. In Christopher Moseley (Editor in chief) Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger – UNESCO. (Online version : 21-02-2009), 3ième Edition, pp. 26-31. http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/endangered-languages/atlas-of-languages- in- danger/editors-and-contributors/

El Kirat El Allame Y. & Kenza T. (2010a). Perceptions de l’Amazighité au Sein de la Famille Marocaine. In El Kirat, Faculté des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines, UM5-Agdal (Editrice). Rabat: Bouregreg, Maroc. 2010, pp.351-368. Serie: Colloque et Séminaire N° 166.

El Kirat El Allame Y. & Said B. (2010b). L’Enseignement de la langue Amazighe entre Dialectologie et Standardization, Déperdition, Maintien et/ou

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (215)

215YAMINA EL KIRAT EL ALLAME & YASSINE BOUSSAGUI

Revitalisation.Revue: Langues et Littératures, 2010, Volume 20, pp. 13-41.

El Kirat, Y. & Boussagui, Y. (2018). Amazigh in Morocco. In Seals, C. A. & Shah, S. (Eds.). Heritage Language Policies around the World (pp. 111-127). New York, NY: Routledge.

Ennaji, M.(2005).Multiculturalism,Cultural Identity and Education in Morocco.Ennaji, M. (2003). Attitudes to Berber and Tifinagh. In Proceedings of the

conference on Amazigh Language and Culture. Ifrane: Al-Akhawayn Univeristy.

Ennaji, M. (1997). The sociology of Berber: Change and continuity. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 123, 23–40.

Errihani, M. (2006). Language policy in Morocco: Problems and prospects of teaching Tamazight. The Journal of North African Studies, 11(2),

143–154.Errihani, M. (2007). Language policy in Morocco: Implications of recognizing and teaching Berber. (Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation), University of

Illinois, Chicago.Hornberger, N. (Ed). (2008). Can Schools save indigenous languages? Policy and Practice on four Continents. New York, N.Y: Palgrave Macmillan.Laroui, A. (1977). Les origines culturelles du nationalisme marocain. Paris: F.

Maspero.Magni, G. (2017). Indigenous Knowledge and implications for the sustainable development agenda. European Journal of Education. 52, pp. 437-

447.Marcellesi, J.-B. (1983). ‘Identité linguistique, exclamatives et subordonnées: un modèle syntaxique spécifique en Corse’, Études Corses 20–21:

399–424. Repr. in Marcellesi et al. (eds.), 209–34Marley, D. (2004). Language attitudes in Morocco following recent changes in language policy. Language Policy, 3, 25–46.Noah, P. (1999). From ethnic marginalization to linguistic cleansing: A

contribution to the national language question. In G.O. Simire (Ed.). Acts of the 9th MLAN Conference. Benin, 87-100.

Noah, P. (2003). Education and minority language: The Nigerian dimension. In Ndimele (Ed.). Four decades in the study of Nigerian languages

and linguistics in Nigeria. Aba: NINLAN, 173-182.Okafor, M. & Noah, P. (2014). The Role of Local Languages in Sustainable

community development projects in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. European Scientific Journal. Vol.10, No. 35, pp. 272-283.Sadiqi, F. (1997). The place of Berber in Morocco. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 123, 7–21.Salem Chaker interviewed by Said Chemack & Masin Ferkal, on January 18th,

2004, for http://www.tamazgha.fr/Professor-Chaker-Speaks-Out-on- the-Tifinagh-Script-Issue, 427.html)Stroud, C. 2002. Towards a Policy for Bilingual Education in Developing

Countries.New Education Division Document No. 10. Stockholm: Sida.Thiers, G. (1993). Language Contact and Corsican Polynomia, in Posner, R.

and J. N. Green (eds) Bilingualism and Linguistic Conflict in Romance, Berlin: Mounton de Gruyter.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (216)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (217)

RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE, DANS UNE PERSPECTIVE DE DEVELOPPEMENT

DURABLE A MADAGASCAR : POURQUOI ET COMMENT ?

Irène Rabenoro

Résumé: Cette contribution vise à montrer pourquoi il faut raviver l’intérêt pour le malgache, langue minorée, dans une perspective de développement durable à Madagascar et comment s’y prendre. Bien qu’étant l’unique langue nationale du pays, le malgache est minoré par rapport au français, ancienne langue coloniale, dans un contexte d’extrême pauvreté et de stabilité politique fragile. Le malgache et le français sont de nouveau, comme dans la Constitution de la première République malgache de 1959, les deux langues officielles du pays depuis fin 2010. Bien que le malgache soit la langue de communication de la grande majorité de la population, on ne peut occulter un phénomène qui semble s’intensifier : l’abandon de cette langue en faveur du français par un certain nombre de familles de la capitale.

Alors qu’un développement durable requiert l’adhésion et la participation de tous, la fracture entre les élites multilingues malgache-langue(s) internationale(s) et la grande majorité monolingue malgachophone tend à s’agrandir. Après un aperçu des raisons pour lesquelles il est nécessaire de raviver l’intérêt des uns et des autres pour la langue nationale dans l’optique d’un développement durable, des propositions dans ce sens sont avancées. Il s’agit notamment de faire constater que les langues malgache et française sont à la fois riches et pauvres l’une par rapport à l’autre.

Mots clés: Malgache, français, langue minorée, développement durable, approche interculturelle.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (218)

218 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

REACTIVAR EL INTERÉS POR EL MALGACHE, LENGUA MINORIZADA, EN UNA PERSPECTIVA DE DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE EN MADAGASCAR: ¿POR QUÉ Y CÓMO?

Resumen: Esta contribución tiene por objetivo mostrar por qué es preciso reactivar el interés por el malgache, lengua minorizada, en una perspectiva de desarrollo sostenible en Madagascar y cómo llevarlo a cabo. Aunque sea la única lengua nacional del país, el malgache está minorizado con respecto al francés, antigua lengua colonial, y se encuentra en un contexto de pobreza extrema y de una estabilidad política frágil. El malgache y el francés son de nuevo, como en la Constitución de la Primera República Malgache de 1959, lenguas oficiales del país desde 2010. Aunque el malgache sea la lengua de comunicación de la gran mayoría de la población, no se puede negar un fenómeno que parece que se está intensificando: el abandono de esta lengua a favor del francés por un cierto/gran número de familias de la capital.

Si bien el desarrollo sostenible requiere la adhesión y la participación de todos, la fractura entre las élites plurilingües malgache-lengua(s) internacional(es) y la gran mayoría monolingüe malgache tiende a aumentar. Tras una visión general de las razones por las cuales es necesario reactivar el interés de unos y de otros hacia la lengua nacional desde una óptica de desarrollo sostenible, se avanzan/plantean propuestas en este sentido. Se trata, fundamentalmente de hacer constatar que las lenguas malgache y francés son igualmente ricas y pobres la una con respecto a la otra

Palabras clave: Malgache, francés, lengua minorizada, desarrollo sostenible, aproximación intercultural.

Introduction

Le contexte actuel d’extrême pauvreté à Madagascar donne lieu à toutes sortes de phénomènes, dont certains sont communs à d’autres pays, en particulier à d’anciennes colonies. Ainsi en est-il de la non transmission par un certain nombre de parents de leur propre langue maternelle à leurs enfants, lui préférant le français, langue de l’ancien colonisateur. D’après Louis-Jean Calvet (2017), le phénomène est loin d’être nouveau : « ( …) depuis des siècles et des siècles, les êtres humains ont régulièrement abandonné leurs langues, changé de moyens de communication. »

De tels parents se rencontrent notamment dans la capitale, Antananarivo. A cet égard, nous rejoignons Baumgardt (2018) pour affirmer que les langues minorées sont « mésestimées parfois par les locuteurs eux-mêmes » et que « les langues africaines sont dans leur ensemble minorées par rapport aux langues des anciens colonisateurs, (…). »

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (219)

219IRÈNE RABENORO

Or, il ne saurait y avoir de développement durable sans une communication suffisamment fluide entre les diverses parties prenantes au processus. Aussi avons-nous décidé de nous pencher sur la question de « Raviver l’intérêt pour le malgache, langue minorée, dans une perspective de développement durable à Madagascar : pourquoi et comment ? ».

Examinons en premier lieu le paradoxe qui prévaut en l’état actuel des choses : d’un côté, le phénomène de minorisation de cette langue nationale unique qu’est le malgache par rapport à l’ancienne langue coloniale qu’est le français et de l’autre, le fait que pour la grande majorité de la population, la langue, leur langue, l’unique, demeure le malgache.

1. Le malgache, une langue nationale unique minorée et forte à la fois

Madagascar, la plus grande île de cette zone du sud-ouest de l’Océan indien, au large de la côte orientale africaine, ne possède qu’une langue nationale, le malgache. Cette langue d’Afrique appartient à la famille des langues austronésiennes et plus particulièrement au groupe des langues malayo-polynésiennes. En dépit des variétés géographiques de la langue malgache, son unicité permet une intercompréhension relativement élevée entre les populations d’origines ethniques différentes. Et pourtant, maintenant peut-être plus que jamais depuis l’indépendance du pays en 1960 après 64 ans de colonisation française, cette langue nationale unique se trouve minorée.

1.1. Un paradoxe : une langue nationale minorée quoique majoritaire

Le paradoxe au niveau des langues en usage à Madagascar n’est pas le premier à faire l’objet d’interrogations. Il est précédé du paradoxe (cf. M. Razafindrakoto, F. Roubaud et J.-M. Wachsberger, 2017) entre la pauvreté grandissante et l’absence de conflits majeurs dans l’histoire du pays, notamment de guerres généralement considérées comme sources de régression économique.

« Pour la grande majorité des Malgaches, il va de soi que leur langue est le malgache », disions-nous récemment (Rabenoro, 2018). Cette affirmation est confortée par la citation faite par Velomihanta Ranaivo (2007) de Z. Ramandazafy (2004), selon laquelle « des recherches récentes soulignent le fait que, pour une très grande majorité de Malgaches, la communication se fait uniquement dans la langue nationale. L’absence de la langue malgache dans l’Atlas des langues en danger dans le monde (Moseley. UNESCO. 2010) vient du reste confirmer un tel état de fait.

Et pourtant, le nombre de gens qui préfèrent le français au malgache ne cesse d’augmenter, parallèlement à la multiplication des écoles dites

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (220)

220 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

d’expression française, et plus rarement anglaise. L’abandon de la langue nationale au profit de l’ancienne langue coloniale semble ainsi aller de pair avec l’état peu reluisant de l’éducation et de l’économie, et une situation sociale marquée par des inégalités criantes, une paupérisation croissante à vue d’œil et un taux de chômage important. D’après le Rapport national sur le développement humain Madagascar 2018, p.21, « Plus de la moitié des malgaches souffrent de pauvreté multidimensionnelle. » Par « pauvreté multidimensionnelle », il est entendu non accès à l’éducation, aux soins de santé et faible niveau de vie.

Le malgache est la langue des pauvres, voire la langue de la pauvreté, c’est ainsi qu’il est perçu actuellement. Pour le moment, pour ce qui est de ces liens entre langues et situation socioéconomique, il ne s’agit que d’un constat car aucune étude ne semble avoir été menée dans ce sens.

Il faut dire que pour tout jeune diplômé, il est quasiment impossible de trouver un emploi sans des compétences en langue française, et plus rarement en anglais ou dans une autre langue étrangère. Même dans le domaine de l’enseignement, les spécialistes de la langue malgache sont moins recherchés que les enseignants de français ou d’anglais. La raison en est sans doute que le malgache n’est langue d’enseignement que dans les deux premières années du primaire, le français prenant ensuite le relais du moins officiellement.

L’on est en droit de se demander si les parents qui ne parlent pas malgache à leurs enfants sont conscients de couper ces derniers de leur monde, de les confiner à un environnement étroit et fermé, et de les empêcher de s’épanouir. Alors qu’ailleurs on se bat contre l’exclusion, pour certains parents malgaches, l’exclusion de leurs enfants de la société malgache est un choix qui n’est peut-être pas bien raisonné.

Dans ce contexte où la fierté d’être malgache bat de l’aile, où bien des gens ne croient plus en l’avenir de leur pays, un regain d’intérêt pour la langue nationale se développe.

1.2. De la vitalité de la langue nationale

L’environnement linguistique et culturel, ainsi que mentionné plus haut, est très largement malgache. Mieux encore, la vitalité du malgache se perçoit à travers les kabary (art oratoire) pour lesquels il y a un véritable engouement. Les kabary, considérés la plupart du temps comme des discours traditionnels, comportent toutes sortes de figures de style, de proverbes… Ils doivent faire l’objet d’un apprentissage et sont prononcés en diverses occasions, notamment lors de l’inauguration de quelque réalisation du gouvernement mais aussi et surtout lors d’évènements heureux (mariages, fêtes traditionnelles) et malheureux (visites de condoléances).

Des cours de kabary sont organisés un peu partout dans le pays mais aussi en France, en Suisse, au Canada... D’après l’association internationale

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (221)

221IRÈNE RABENORO

des rhéteurs malgaches (FIMPIMA ou « Fikambanan’ny Mpikabary Malagasy »), qui a fêté ses 55 ans en 2018, il y a actuellement quelque 160 centres d’enseignement du kabary à Madagascar.

Il serait intéressant d’étudier les types de gens qui pratiquent le kabary ou s’y initient. On aurait ainsi une idée de ce qui les diffèrent des parents qui ne parlent que français à leurs enfants. Les kabary, ancrés dans la culture, consistent en une manipulation artistique de la langue malgache et constituent une activité sociale d’importance. Bon nombre de rhéteurs en ont fait un métier, car il est vrai que bien des familles plus ou moins aisées font appel aux services des rhéteurs notamment quand il y a un décès dans la famille et qu’il faut répondre aux discours de ceux qui viennent présenter leurs condoléances. Un fait plus habituel : une cérémonie de famadihana, fête traditionnelle destinée à honorer les morts devenus des ancêtres, ne peut se faire sans des rhéteurs professionnels.

Il va sans dire que malgré un usage hybride malgacho-français de la langue malgache dans la capitale, le malgache ne cesse de se créer des mots nouveaux parmi les jeunes, mais aussi au sein des cercles académiques. Ainsi par exemple, l’Académie Malgache a lancé le mot « lahadinika » pour « ordre du jour ». Ce mot a été adopté sans hésiter par les médias.

Cette vitalité de la langue, qui ne bénéficie pas d’un soutien institutionnel, ne fait toutefois pas le poids face aux langues de communication internationale, en particulier le français et dans une moindre mesure l’anglais.

2. Pourquoi raviver l’intérêt pour la langue malgache

Bien que l’intérêt pour la langue malgache soit inégal d’un milieu social à l’autre et d’une circonstance à une autre, il n’en reste pas moins qu’il est en train de devenir un sujet de préoccupation. Le développement d’un pays aussi pauvre que Madagascar se passerait bien d’une fracture de plus entre élites et population, cette fois-ci plus centrale que toute autre car liée à l’outil de communication entre les différentes composantes de la population. A cet égard, M. Razafindrakoto, F. Roubaud et J.-M. Wachsberger (2017), proposent p.239 : « (…) créer un espace de dialogue institutionnalisé pour des échanges et débats citoyens avec pour unique objectif de contribuer à réduire la fracture grandissante entre les élites et la population, dans ses multiples dimensions. (…) Il conviendrait donc de choisir une batterie de « mots-concepts » et de les questionner, afin d’en faire évoluer la signification, d’en reconfigurer l’articulation en un système de valeurs malgaches propices au développement partagé et équitable, tout en restant ancré dans l’histoire. » Une telle proposition mérite qu’on y prête attention car le défi de la lutte contre la pauvreté est immense.

Même certains mendiants de la capitale, qui font probablement leur propre « étude de marché » avant de se lancer dans l’activité, se mettent à utiliser des mots français pour remercier ceux qui leur ont donné un peu

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (222)

222 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

d’argent. Au lieu d’une formule de remerciements malgache habituelle, c’est « Merci beaucoup » qu’on entend. A croire que même les groupes marginalisés de la population de la capitale sont conscients de ce phénomène de minorisation, voire d’abandon de la langue malgache.

Ceci étant, qu’y a-t-il dans la langue malgache d’intéressant dans une optique de développement durable pour qu’on ait à raviver l’intérêt pour cette langue nationale ?

2.1. Fandeferana, un exemple de mot utile à un développement durable

Le malgache ou une autre langue, la culture malgache ou une autre culture, chaque langue, chaque culture vaut la peine d’être préservée en ce qu’elle recèle de richesses qui contribuent à renforcer la compréhension mutuelle, à préserver et à améliorer les relations sociales, et à consolider l’harmonie de la société. Le cas de la langue et de la culture malgache n’est pris que comme exemple mais ne saurait servir de point de départ à une généralisation.

Nous sommes d’avis que dans toute culture, il y a des points positifs et des points négatifs et qu’il ne s’agit pas de porter un regard sentimental ou exotique sur les cultures traditionnelles (Rabenoro, 1999, p.73). Ceci dit, il y a véritablement des mots ou des expressions qui véhiculent des pratiques, des façons de vivre ensemble qui mériteraient d’être préservées et promues.

Ainsi, quand l’année 1995 fut déclarée Année des Nations Unies pour la tolérance, les journalistes malgaches ont traduit « tolérance » en malgache par fandeferana (Rabenoro, op.cit., p.72). Ce n’est qu’alors que l’attention fut attirée par l’absence d’un équivalent exact de « tolérance » en malgache et de fandeferana en français. Autant la notion de tolérance devrait être propagée et mise en pratique par les Malgaches, autant fandeferana est une notion qui mérite d’être connue non seulement à Madagascar mais partout ailleurs. En gros, fandeferana est contre la loi du plus fort et se réfère à une volonté d’éviter tout conflit. Pour prendre un exemple simple de la vie de tous les jours, si deux enfants se disputent une banane parce qu’il n’y en a qu’une, on dira à l’aîné de céder la banane au plus jeune ou tout au moins de la partager avec lui. On considère que l’aîné, souvent plus fort physiquement si tant est que les deux enfants devaient se battre, peut mieux comprendre la situation et faire preuve de mansuétude.

Cet exemple du mot fandeferana donne une idée du genre de mots qui renferment une valeur et une pratique en général bénéfiques à l’harmonie sociale, voire à la paix. La mise en pratique de fandeferana peut aussi être mutuelle, dans lequel cas on dirait fifandeferana. Par exemple pour les gens au volant quand il y a des perturbations dans la circulation, on peut promouvoir l’idée de fifandeferana pour que des concessions soient faites de part et d’autre. Bien que cette pratique se perde dans la capitale notamment

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (223)

223IRÈNE RABENORO

dans les transports en commun, elle demeure une valeur et une pratique bien vivantes dans d’autres situations et plus généralement, dans d’autres villes et à la campagne.

La tolérance quant à elle se retrouve un peu partout dans les déclarations et conventions internationales en rapport avec la paix, à commencer par la Déclaration des droits de l’homme de 1948 en son article 26, paragraphe 2 (cf. UNESCO 2013). Aux fins d’un usage national et pour une meilleure intégration de la population malgache dans le monde, le concept de tolérance doit absolument devenir partie intégrante de la langue et la culture malgaches. Pour ne pas avoir à créer un mot nouveau pour exprimer le sens de « tolérance », peut-être peut-on trouver un moyen d’ajouter son sens au mot fandeferana. Il faudrait alors le faire savoir publiquement pour éviter toute confusion entre tolérance et fandeferana.

2.2. Prévenir l’exclusion en favorisant l’inclusion par le multilinguisme

Il est du ressort de l’Etat de prendre en main l’avenir du pays, de prévenir et d’anticiper une possible scission, de possibles fragmentations de la société. Si certains parents préfèrent l’exclusion certaine de leurs enfants de la société malgache, c’est non seulement par méconnaissance des enjeux d’un tel choix mais aussi à cause de la défaillance de l’Etat qui n’a pas jusqu’ici adopté une politique linguistique quelconque.

A défaut d’une véritable politique linguistique explicite qui définirait clairement les fonctions à faire assumer par chaque langue, l’Etat peut tout au moins envisager le développement d’un bi-/multilinguisme et programmer sa mise en œuvre. Il s’agit là d’une aspiration que partagent bien des Malgaches, ainsi que l’atteste l’enquête menée par Raymond Elia Ranaivoson (2004, p.96) il y a 15 ans, et qui lui a fait dire à propos des élèves de l’école primaire publique auprès de laquelle il a mené son enquête « (qu’ils) n’ont fait nullement preuve d’hostilité envers la langue de l’ancien colonisateur qu’est le français » et qu’ils « (…) semblent tout à fait disposés à bénéficier d’une éducation bilingue. »

Une dizaine d’années après, la phrase de Henri Rahaingoson (de son pseudonyme Di), qui traduit ce désir de bi-/multilinguisme, prend tout son sens : « Andrianiko ny teniko, ny an’ny hafa koa feheziko (Di… 1993) » (« Ma langue, je la fais souveraine, quant à celles d›autrui, je les maîtrise et les fais miennes aussi » (Di… 1997). ») (M. Rahaingoson, 2016, p.34). Henri Rahaingoson ne se doutait peut-être pas que sa phrase allait devenir en quelque sorte une devise pour bien des gens, et est même promise à un bel avenir car en bonne voie de devenir une devise nationale. Sa mise en œuvre est une toute autre histoire.

Si le français fut et est de nouveau la principale langue d’enseignement, c’est surtout nous semble-t-il parce qu’il est le plus approprié pour assumer

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (224)

224 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

cette fonction, le malgache étant insuffisamment adapté à cela. Et pour cause : le système éducatif en vigueur dans beaucoup de pays dans le monde, dont les anciennes colonies de certains pays européens, est essentiellement fondé sur la pensée, la culture et les connaissances occidentales. On ne fait guère allusion à un tel fait, comme s’il n’était pas politiquement correct d’en parler ouvertement. Ainsi, à moins que le développement du malgache pour en faire une langue d’enseignement ne soit poursuivi et renforcé, que les enseignants ne soient formés dans ce sens et que des matériels didactiques ne soient mis à disposition, il est périlleux d’en faire à nouveau l’unique langue d’enseignement. Le malgache fut l’unique langue d’enseignement dans le primaire et le secondaire environ entre 1973 et 1992.

3. Comment raviver l’intérêt pour la langue nationale

De même que Rodolphine Sylvia WAMBA conclut que la pédagogie et la didactique de l’interculturel restent finalement à inventer dans la salle de classe, de même les actions destinées à préserver et à promouvoir les langues minorées là où, paradoxalement, elles sont majoritaires, restent à inventer. Il faut préciser qu’il s’agit de langues minorées non européennes face aux langues de communication internationale qui elles, sont européennes. La précision est utile car les différences au plan linguistique et culturel ont des chances d’être plus grandes entre langues non apparentées.

3.1. De la rareté des jeux de langage

Pour tenter de répondre à la question de savoir comment préserver et promouvoir une langue minorée, nous avons pensé à un jeu de langage pour grand public, même s’il y a peu de chances qu’il atteigne les zones rurales faute d’accès aux supports médiatiques. D’emblée, précisons que le jeu proposé concerne les variétés standard du malgache et du français, l’objectif étant entre autres de stimuler l’apprentissage des deux langues.

Des jeux de langage existent mais ils ne concernent que l’une ou l’autre langue. Par exemple, les « ankamantatra » (devinettes) pour le malgache, ou les mots croisés et autres Scrabble pour le français. En général, dans le cadre scolaire, les jeux de langage ne sont pas inclus dans les activités d’apprentissage des langues.

Du moins à notre connaissance, les jeux de langage qui mettent en jeu le français et le malgache se limitent à « Sokerambolana - échiquier verbal ». D’après son auteur, Mathilde Deverchin-Rakotozafy (2015), « ce jeu éducatif est axé sur le bilinguisme franco-malgache » et s’adresse aux enfants lettrés de 8 ans et plus. Ce jeu qui s’inspire du scrabble, dont l’objectif est de développer les compétences lexicales en malgache et en français, n’a pas été conçu dans une perspective interculturelle.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (225)

225IRÈNE RABENORO

3.2. Un aperçu du jeu proposé

Quant au jeu proposé ici, il est destiné à deux types de public : d’abord, à des jeunes et à des adultes d’un niveau d’éducation assez élevé pour qui c’est un défi de faire usage de leurs compétences essentiellement lexicales mais aussi grammaticales en malgache et en français et de développer leurs compétences interlinguistiques et interculturelles. Etant donné qu’un autre volet du jeu ne concerne que le malgache, il pourrait s’adresser tout aussi bien à des gens qui n’ont reçu qu’une éducation formelle limitée.

Dans le but de faire apprécier par les Malgaches leur propre langue en la mettant en parallèle avec la langue française que beaucoup souhaitent connaître, le jeu en question serait oral et radio-télévisé. La raison du choix de l’oral est dû au fait que ce serait l’occasion de s’exprimer oralement dans les deux langues, et d’entendre les variétés standard du malgache et du français.

En effet, que ce soit dans le cadre de leurs études ou dans la vie sociale, les enfants et les jeunes n’ont pas suffisamment d’opportunités pour s’exprimer. La parole demeure souvent le monopole des personnes âgées, parfois des hommes et dans le contexte scolaire, des enseignants. A l’école aussi bien qu’à l’université, l’approche participative est encore loin d’être effective, l’enseignant monopolisant la parole la plupart du temps. Dans le primaire et le secondaire, ne possédant pas les compétences suffisantes pour enseigner en français, bon nombre d’enseignants se contentent de faire recopier ce qu’ils écrivent au tableau – ce qui laisse les apprenants tout à fait passifs et muets.

De type interactif, ce jeu permettrait au public de réagir, d’interagir, de (se) corriger et d’améliorer ses connaissances du malgache et du français. Il s’agit là d’un défi majeur qui ne semble pouvoir être mis en œuvre qu’avec un appui institutionnel, en ressources humaines et logistiques.

Une approche interlinguistique et interculturelle est préconisée, qui consiste à :

• faire appel aux connaissances essentiellement lexicales et culturelles mais aussi grammaticales des participants en malgache et en français, et à

• inciter les participants à faire usage de leurs capacités à comparer, à interpréter et à réexprimer des sens dans l’une ou l’autre langue.

Une démarche entièrement empirique a été adoptée dans l’élaboration du jeu. Elle consiste notamment à collecter les mots et expressions malgaches dont les équivalents français sont inexistants ou approximatifs et inversem*nt, en prenant le français comme langue de départ. La collecte s’est faite sur

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (226)

226 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

trois ans et continue à se faire dans le cadre d’un cours intitulé « Problèmes de traduction liées aux spécificités culturelles » dispensé dans le cadre du Master « Etudes plurilingues et interculturelles »1 de la Faculté des Lettres et Sciences humaines, Université d’Antananarivo (Madagascar).

Un inventaire de ce qui peut faire l’objet du jeu a été établi. Cet inventaire est loin d’être exhaustif car grandes sont les différences entre le malgache, langue austronésienne, et le français, langue européenne. Par ailleurs, leurs différences sont accentuées par le fait le malgache est en usage dans un pays en développement tandis que le français est utilisé dans un pays industrialisé.

Comme toute langue, le malgache et le français véhiculent et reflètent à la fois des objets, des concepts, des valeurs et des usages qu’ils partagent parfois ou qui leur sont propres. Venons-en à leur examen.

4. Du contenu du jeu proposé

Comme indiqué précédemment, les éléments du jeu résultent d’une collecte de mots et énoncés ressentis ou constatés comme spécifiques à la langue malgache par rapport au français lors des exercices de traduction d’une langue à l’autre.

4.1 Des éléments constitutifs du jeu

Un tri des éléments collectés a été opéré pour ne retenir ici que ceux qui semble-t-il sont non seulement d’emploi fréquent mais qui constituent également un obstacle à l’apprentissage du français par des apprenants malgachophones. L’inexistence de liens de parenté entre le français et le malgache paraît être la principale raison de l’ampleur de leurs différences, tant au plan lexical que grammatical. Leurs similitudes sont rares et ne se perçoivent qu’au niveau du lexique. Commençons par les différences qui prévalent entre les deux langues du point de vue grammatical.

4.1.1Lesdifférencesd’ordregrammaticalentrelefrançaisetle malgache

Pour que cette partie ne soit pas trop longue, ce n’est qu’après la présentation d’au moins deux types de différence que des exemples les illustrant seront donnés. Ainsi, chaque exemple contiendra les points évoqués.

1 Ce cours est dispensé à l’intention des étudiants en allemand, anglais, espagnol et russe dans les langues que partagent les étudiants et nous-même, l’enseignante : le malgache et le français.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (227)

227IRÈNE RABENORO

La différence la plus notable concerne le genre : alors que le genre n’est pas marqué en malgache, il est fortement marqué en français avec l’existence du masculin et du féminin et de tout ce que cela entraîne en termes d’accord avec les divers éléments d’un énoncé (déterminants, verbes, adjectifs...).

Pour ce qui est des temps grammaticaux, ils sont relativement simples et peu nombreux en malgache tandis qu’en français, ils sont nombreux et complexes.

EXEMPLE 1 : LE GENRE ET LES TEMPS GRAMMATICAUX

Il s’agit de traduire des énoncés ou des mots malgaches en français. Les abréviations suivantes seront utilisées : « MG » pour « malgache » et « FR » pour « français ». Afin d’en faciliter la lecture, les mots devant attirer l’attention ont été mis en italique.

MG Oviana izy no tonga ?FR Quand est-ce qu’il ou elle est arrivé(e) ?

Un contexte plus large est nécessaire pour savoir si « izy » renvoie à un homme (« il ») ou à une femme (« elle »).

Pour ce qui concerne le temps, le verbe malgache « tonga » n’est porteur d’aucun marqueur du passé alors qu’en français, on a un passé composé. Le temps passé est ici exprimé par « oviana » (quand). Pour le futur, on aurait « rahoviana ».

EXEMPLE 2 : FORME DE COMPENSATION DE L’INEXISTENCE DE MARQUEURS DU GENRE

MG Misakafo ny anadahiko no tonga aho.

FR Mon frère (« anadahiko ») mangeait (« misakafo ») quand je suis arrivée.

Etant donné que « anadahiko », qui veut dire « mon frère », ne peut être utilisé que par une femme, en l’occurrence une sœur ou une cousine de l’intéressé, la personne qui parle est forcément une femme. Ici, l’absence d’un marqueur du genre est donc compensée par l’emploi du substantif « anadahiko ».(mon frère).

A noter que le verbe « misakafo », bien que traduit par un temps passé en français, ne porte pas le marqueur du passé « -n » (« nisakafo ») car il renvoie ici à une action qui est en train de se faire.

De même que pour le genre, le nombre n’est pas marqué en malgache. Le français par contre possède des marqueurs dont le plus courant, mais pas le seul, est le -s à la fin des noms, des adjectifs…

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (228)

228 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

Quant aux déictiques, ils sont nombreux en malgache et expriment des nuances de sens telles que souhaitées par l’énonciateur par rapport à l’objet dont il est question.

L’emploi fréquent des formes impersonnelles est aussi une des caractéristiques de la langue malgache, comme si l’énonciateur ne voulait pas prendre en charge son énoncé, comme s’il ne tenait pas à s’engager.

EXEMPLE 3 : ABSENCE DE MARQUEURS DU NOMBRE, DÉICTIQUES ET FORMES IMPERSONNELLES.

MG Iretsy olona iretsy no lazaina fa tompon’ity tany ity.

Cet énoncé contient deux déictiques : “iretsy” (qui indique une courte distance par rapport à l’énonciateur) et “ity” (qui renvoie au lieu où se trouve l’énonciateur).

“Olona”, qui peut être un singulier (une personne, quelqu’un) ou un pluriel (les gens) est ici un pluriel car le déictique « iretsy » indique le pluriel. Le singulier est « itsy ».

« Lazaina » : forme impersonnelle. Littéralement, « sont dits être ».

A noter que le verbe « être » n’existe pas en malgache, ce qui est fâcheux pour ceux qui travaillent dans le domaine de la philosophie occidentale.

« Ity tany ity » : littéralement, ce terrain-ci sur lequel nous nous trouvons.

FR Ce sont ces gens là-bas qui paraît-il sont (qu’on dit être) les propriétaires de ce terrain.

Sous-entendu : ces gens qu’on voit pas loin là-bas.

Nul doute qu’il y a d’autres différences entre le malgache et le français au plan grammatical qui n’ont pas été répertoriées ici. Cependant, on peut raisonnablement espérer que celles qui servent au mieux notre objet l’ont été.

Abordons à présent les similitudes du point de vue lexico-sémantique ainsi que les mots et expressions perçus comme spécifiques au malgache.

4.1.2 Similitudes entre le malgache et le français

Les similitudes entre les deux langues qui ont été relevées se limitent aux emprunts du malgache au français d’une part et d’autre part, aux expressions liées à des parties du corps humain.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (229)

229IRÈNE RABENORO

Concernant les emprunts, des mots français ont été adaptés à la langue malgache et y sont si bien intégrés qu’il y a des chances pour que beaucoup de malgachophones ne soient pas conscients de leurs origines étrangères.

EXEMPLES

Latabatra (table), seza (chaise), dibera (beurre), lakolosy (cloche).

Des similitudes entre le français et le malgache qui se perçoivent au niveau d’expressions formées de mots renvoyant à des parties du corps humain ont été également répertoriées.

EXEMPLES

Manongilan-tsofina : qui tend l’oreille. « Sofina » signifie « oreille(s) ».

Ento aho tongotro : prendre les jambes à son cou. « Tongotra » signifie « jambe(s) ».

Traitons à présent des mots et expressions spécifiques au malgache en ce qu’ils sont liés à la culture malgache.

4.1.3 Spécificités du malgache du point de vue lexico-sémantique

Il sera procédé à un survol de la question des spécificités d’ordre lexico-sémantique par rapport au français car il n’est pas possible d’en faire le tour tant elles sont nombreuses. Ici aussi, on évitera de présenter des spécificités de faible fréquence d’emploi. On commencera par les métaphores et expressions métaphoriques.

MÉTAPHORES ET EXPRESSIONS MÉTAPHORIQUES

MG Efa herintaona izy no misotro ronono.FR Cela fait un an qu’il ou elle est retraité(e).

« Misotro ronono » : littéralement, qui boit du lait. On pense donc des personnes âgées qui ne travaillent plus qu’elles boivent du lait.

MG Mamy hoditra amin’ny olona amin’ity faritra ity ilay solombavambahoaka lany farany teo.

FR Les gens de cette région aiment bien ce député qui a été élu dernièrement.

« Mamy hoditra » signifie littéralement « dont la peau douce/sucrée est appréciée (ny olona = des gens) ».

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (230)

230 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

L’expression métaphorique « mamy hoditra » peut être remplacée par le verbe « tiana » (aimer), mais ce dernier est plus neutre et moins significatif.

Solombavambahoaka : littéralement, veut dire “qui est le porte-parole du peuple”. Cette métaphore est l’équivalent de « député ».

EMPLOI DU NÉGATIF « TSY » + ADJECTIF» AU LIEU D’UN MOT POSITIF

En malgache, on a tendance à ne pas utiliser des mots trop directs, pour ne pas heurter l’interlocuteur ou l’auditoire. Ainsi, on dira plus « naturellement » : « vaovao tsy marina izany » (ce sont des nouvelles qui ne sont pas vraies) au lieu de « vaovao diso izany » (ce sont de fausses nouvelles).

Par ailleurs, il n’y a semble-t-il pas de mot pour « non ». C’est peut-être pour cela qu’on dit des Malgaches qu’ils ne disent jamais « non ».

« Oui » se dit « eny » dans la variété standard mais ce mot n’est utilisé que lors des référendums ou dans des situations très formelles.

Pour dire « non », le mot est « tsia », qui pourrait – simple hypothèse - être « tsy ya », c’est-à-dire « pas oui ». Ya” est le mot pour “oui” dans une variété géographique de la langue malgache, le betsimisaraka.

Tout comme « eny » (oui), « tsia » n’est guère utilisé dans la vie de tous les jours. Ce sont des sons difficiles à transcrire qu’on émet pour dire « oui » et « non ».

MOTS CARACTÉRISTIQUES DU MALGACHE

On parlera d’abord des innombrables mots et expressions composés avec « fo » (cœur). Stéréotype ou non, on dit des Malgaches qu’ils sont des « olon’ny fo » (des gens de cœur). D’après les recherches effectuées par Rabekoto Vazoly Razainirina dans le cadre de son mémoire de Master, il y a une multitude de mots et expressions contenant le mot « fo » (cœur) en malgache – environ 250.

EXEMPLES DE MOTS COMPOSÉS OU D’EXPRESSIONS CONTENANT LE MOT « FO » (CŒUR)

Certains ont quelque rapport avec le cœur, d’autres n’en ont pas du moins à première vue.

Mafana fo : littéralement, qui a le cœur chaud. Signifie « enthousiaste ».

Mpiray tampo : littéralement, qui sont unis par un même cœur. Désigne les membres d’une même fratrie : frère(s) et/ou sœur(s).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (231)

231IRÈNE RABENORO

Afa-po : littéralement, avoir le cœur léger/libéré. Signifie « être satisfait(e) ».

MOTS ET EXPRESSIONS MALGACHES EXPRIMANT DES COULEURS porteurs de sens et de valeurs spécifiques

MG Maitso voloFR Littéralement, aux cheveux verts = Jeune(s)

Maitso volo : cheveux verts car en malgache, le vert, le bleu et le noir ne sont pas clairement délimités et il arrive même qu’ils se confondent. Ce qui est qualifié de bleu ou de vert peut être du noir et inversem*nt aux yeux des gens habitués à la culture occidentale.

MG Analamanga (ancien nom de la capitale, Antananarivo. Nom actuel de la région où se trouve Antananarivo.)

FR Littéralement, forêt bleue. Etant donné que « manga » (bleu) a une connotation positive, la couleur de cette forêt serait donc d’un beau vert (ou bleu)

On se demande si la Forêt Noire qui se trouve en Allemagne ne fait pas l’objet d’un traitement similaire, c’est-à-dire si elle est appelée ainsi à cause d’une délimitation assez floue entre le vert, couleur des feuilles, et le noir.

MG Fotsy feoFR Littéralement, qui a une voix blanche = Qui n’a pas une belle voix.

Traditionnellement, le blanc n’était pas une belle couleur mais elle l’est devenu avec la colonisation et l’esclavage où il valait mieux avoir un teint clair, aussi proche des Blancs que possible.

MOTS ET EXPRESSIONS MALGACHES CONTENANT DES POINTS CARDINAUX porteurs de sens spécifiques

En malgache, on s’oriente suivant les points cardinaux. On dit qu’on va à l’Est ou au Nord…, au lieu de dire à droite ou à gauche. Ainsi, il est très difficile de traduire en français des phrases contenant un point cardinal, du genre :

MG Milalao ao atsimon-trano ao ny ankizy.FR Littéralement, les enfants jouent côté Sud de la maison. A moins

d’aller voir la maison sur place, on ne sait de quel côté de la maison il s’agit.

Le Nord (MG « avaratra ») en particulier a une connotation méliorative, ainsi qu’on le constate dans l’exemple suivant :

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (232)

232 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

MG Avara-pianaranaFR Littéralement, qui a fait des études dans le Nord. Signifie qui a fait

des études de haut niveau.

MOTS RÉDUPLIQUÉS FORTEMENT POLYSÉMIQUES

La réduplication ou redoublement est un procédé qui consiste en un redoublement du mot lui-même, est un mode de création de mots à sens multiples.

EXEMPLE

MG Matimaty (du mot “maty”)FR Sens possibles : avoir un faible pour quelqu’un, tiède s’il s’agit d’eau,

lumière faible ou clignotante…

FORMES D’EXPRESSION DES RELATIONS SOCIALES ET DES LIENS DE PARENTÉ

MG Un homme demande à un autre homme : “Manao ahoana ny ankizy ?”FR Littéralement, « Comment vont les enfants ? ».

En fait, si c’est un homme qui parle, il voudra dire « Comment va la famille, ta femme et tes enfants ? ».

Apparemment, l’emploi par un homme de la forme « ankizy » témoigne de la persistance de rapports inégalitaires, voire féodaux, entre homme et femme.

MG Mianadahy

Mianaka…FR Mianadahy : premier sens « frère et sœur », ou « cousin et cousine » et par

extension « deux personnes de sexes différents et ayant à peu près le même âge».

Mianaka : premier sens « père ou mère avec un enfant ». Par extension, deux personnes de sexe indifférent mais avec une différence d’âge importante comme s’ils avaient des relations de parents-enfants.

NÉOLOGISMES MALGACHES CRÉÉS À PARTIR DE MOTS FRANÇAIS OU ANGLAIS

Il s’agit de mots traduisant des concepts qu’on qualifiera de globaux. Deux d’entre eux ont été retenus pour être présentés ici :

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (233)

233IRÈNE RABENORO

• Développement durable : fampandrosoana lovain-jafy (littéralement, développement dont les petit*-enfants héritent/bénéficient)

• Empowerment : en français, autonomisation ou responsabilisation selon le contexte. A remarquer que ce ne sont pas exactement les sens de « empowerment » tout comme « autonomisation » et « responsabilisation » n’ont pas d’équivalents anglais. A noter que parfois, « responsabilisation » est donné pour équivalent de l’anglais « accountability » qui, par ailleurs, se traduit par « redevabilité ».

En malgache, « fampahefana » nous semble très bien traduire la forme anglaise « empowerment ».

4.1.4 Mots n’ayant pas d’équivalents dans l’autre langue

Il est des mots malgaches tout autant que français pour lesquels l’une ou l’autre langue n’a pas d’équivalent. Ci-après quelques exemples de ce phénomène.

MOTS FRANÇAIS N’AYANT PAS D’ÉQUIVALENTS MALGACHESEXEMPLES

Initiative, réflexe, admirer, paysage, précis, exact, tolérance, complexité, ambiance, etc.

MOTS MALGACHES N’AYANT PAS D’ÉQUIVALENTS FRANÇAISEXEMPLES

Mampitondra (confier un objet à quelqu’un pour que ce dernier le remette à quelqu’un d’autre), mitsinjo et ses dérivés, fihavanana et ses dérivés (à l’exception de son dérivé fampihavanana qui signifie « réconciliation »), fandeferana, fitsimbinana, fifampitsimbinana, etc.

4.2 De l’utilisation des éléments pour le jeu

L’objectif premier qu’on s’est assigné est de susciter un regain d’intérêt pour la langue malgache qui se trouve minorée chez elle tout en étant majoritaire. A cet effet, la proposition d’élaborer un jeu de langage bilingue malgache-français repose sur l’idée selon laquelle les langues sont égales en dehors du contexte social. C’est en se rappelant que j’avais dit lors d’une interview par TV5 (2016) que « Les langues sont à la fois riches et pauvres les unes par rapport aux autres » que j’ai pensé à ce jeu de langage. La question était de savoir comment prouver que cette assertion pouvait se vérifier. Ce qui nous semble être la meilleure voie possible est le recours à la

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (234)

234 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

comparaison, à une approche interlinguistique et interculturelle.

Ainsi, on entend souvent dire pour justifier l’emploi du français qu’il vaut mieux utiliser le français quand on est pressé parce que le malgache est trop long, pas assez économique. Ceci est peut-être vrai dans des situations professionnelles où le malgache est insuffisamment doté des formes utilisées dans tel ou tel domaine. Mais dans la vie de tous les jours, la langue malgache peut être plus économique que le français, voire que la langue mondiale réputée brève en termes de formulation – l’anglais.

Prenons l’exemple d’un des mots que j’ai juste mentionnés plus haut comme n’ayant pas d’équivalents français : le verbe « mampitondra ». Si on devait l’inclure dans un énoncé qui peut être produit à tout moment dans la vie de tous les jours, on aurait par exemple :

Mba hampitondrao an’i Koto ange ny bokiko adinoko tany aminao e !

Traduction : Pourrais-tu/pourriez-vous confier à Koto le livre (qui m’appartient) que j’ai oublié chez toi/vous (pour qu’il me le donne) ?

Le but de la production de cet énoncé qui comporte hampitondrao n’est pas explicite, il est sous-entendu : « pour qu’il me le donne ».

L’énoncé est clair pour qui connaît le sens du verbe mampitondra (infinitif de hampitondrao) mais il n’est pas évident du fait du sous-entendu.

S’agissant de l’inverse, d’un cas montrant la richesse du français par rapport au malgache, on prendra l’exemple d’un énoncé qui contient un mot sans équivalent malgache qui a été mentionné plus haut : l’adjectif « précis ».

EXEMPLE

« Tu ne pourrais pas être plus précis ? «

Il est quasiment impossible de rendre cette phrase en malgache, à cause de l’adjectif « précis » qui est absent du lexique malgache. On se contenterait de « Tu ne pourrais pas être plus clair(e) ? ».

Pour ce qui concerne les formes de questions à poser aux participants au jeu, deux grands types seront proposés. D’abord, les questions à choix multiples et ensuite, la traduction ou la réexpression.

EXEMPLE DE QUESTION À CHOIX MULTIPLES

Comment dit-on en français « Mora ity pataloa ity » ?

a.) Ce pantalon est bon marché b.) Ce pantalon ne coûte pas cher c.) Ce pantalon a un prix bas.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (235)

235IRÈNE RABENORO

La réponse est le b). En français, il n’y a pas un mot pour le malgache « mora ».

EXEMPLE DE QUESTION DEMANDANT DE TRADUCTION

• J’admire cette dame. Elle marche encore à 95 ans.

Traduction malgache : Miaiky an’ity ramatoa ity aho. Mbola mandeha izy nefa efa 95 taona. (Littéralement, elle marche encore et pourtant elle a déjà 95 ans).

On constate ici une certaine faiblesse du malgache par rapport au français : la traduction malgache de la deuxième phrase est plus longue que l’original français.

Ces quelques idées tendant à susciter l’intérêt des gens qui possèdent une certaine compétence en français et en malgache pourraient être développées. Le jeu aura à faire l’objet d’un test auprès de divers publics potentiels mais il nous semble assez réaliste de penser qu’il peut atteindre son objectif : faire aimer de nouveau sa langue première par le biais de sa mise en parallèle avec la langue internationale jugée plus intéressante.

Conclusion

« Raviver l’intérêt pour le malgache, langue minorée, dans une perspective de développement durable… », tel est l’objet de cette contribution. Finalement, l’objectif était assez modeste compte tenu du contexte général : un pays qui recule plus qu’il n’avance.

Toutefois, la mise en parallèle des langues en jeu – ici le français et le malgache mais plus généralement une langue minorée et une langue dominante – mériterait une étude plus systématique, fondée sur un corpus beaucoup plus large. Ainsi pourrait-on poser les jalons de ce qui semble être la vraie solution à la question des langues mais aussi et surtout à une éducation de qualité : la mise en place d’une éducation multilingue fondée sur la langue maternelle.

Seul un tel projet nous paraît pouvoir répondre non seulement aux aspirations des gens au multilinguisme mais aussi à l’Objectif de Développement Durable n°4 : « Assurer l›accès de tous à une éducation de qualité, sur un pied d›égalité, et promouvoir les possibilités d›apprentissage tout au long de la vie ».

Rappelons toutefois qu’une langue véhicule et reflète à la fois une certaine culture. Or, il n’est pas de culture qui soit entièrement porteuse de valeurs bénéfiques aux populations ni entièrement nuisibles. C’est pour cela qu’il convient de militer en faveur de la diversité culturelle et du multilinguisme. En effet, et nous donnons ici une traduction de l’original anglais : rien que

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (236)

236 RAVIVER L’INTERET POUR LE MALGACHE, LANGUE MINOREE...

l’existence de plusieurs langues offre un superbe répertoire de solutions différentes à ce qui sont souvent les mêmes problèmes, des vocabulaires différents pour des expériences similaires (ou différentes), des expressions différentes d’idées et de valeurs et de croyances. (UNESCO 2013, p.13)

Références bibliographiques

Baumgardt U. (3 sept. 2018). Langues minorées. http://ellaf.huma-num.fr/langues-minorees/ consulté le 8 décembre 2018.

Calvet, L.-.J. (2017). Les langues : quel avenir ? Les effets linguistiques de la mondialisation, Paris : CNRS éditions.Deverchin-Rakotozafy, M. (2015). Jeu éducatif Sokerambolana – Echiquier

verbal, éditions Hachette Livre international / Ed icef, Organisation in ternationale de la Francophonie.Moseley, C. (ed.). (2010). Atlas des langues en danger dans le monde, 3e éd. Paris. Editions UNESCO. Version en ligne : http://www.unesco.org/

culture/en/ endangeredlanguages/atlas consulté le 8 octobre 2018.Rabenoro I. (2018). Le malgache : de la langue des ancêtres à la langue de

la mondialisation. Communication présentée devant l’Académie des sciences d’outre-mer. 27 septembre 2018. A paraître dans Mondes et

Cultures, revue de l’Académie des sciences d’outre-mer, Paris.Rabenoro, I., (2016). Interview par Denise Epoté dans son émission « Et si

vous disiez toute la vérité », TV5 Monde, Antananarivo, 19 novembre 2016. https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=WQwtVSWX-Q0Rabenoro, I. (1999). Multilingual developing countries facing globalization,

Language and development in Africa, Social Dynamics, Vol.25, No.1, p.73.

Rahaingoson, M. (2016). Rary teny an-tsary sy Rakibolana malagasy-frantsay, N°1, Antananarivo : Vohitsera.

Ramandazafy, Z. (2004). Le malgache, langue d’enseignement. Faire taire le coeur pour laisser parler la raison, Revue de l’Océan Indien, juillet-août 2004, p. 62-64, cité par Velomihanta Ranaivo, Le système éducatif de

Madagascar, Revue internationale d’éducation de Sèvres [En ligne], 46 | décembre 2007, mis en ligne le 30 juin 2011, consulté le 12 octobre 2018. URL : http://journals.openedition.org/ries/778 ; DOI : 10.4000/ries.778

Ranaivoson, R. E. T. (2004). Diversité linguistique et développement durable: le malgache et le français du point de vue des bénéficiaires de l’éducation de base à Madagascar, Actes du colloque «Développement durable. Leçons et perspectives», Ouagadougou : Agence universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF) / Agence intergouvernementale de la Francophonie (AIF) / Université de Ouagadougou, 1er au 4 juin 2004. Rapport national sur le développement humain Madagascar 2018, p.21, http://www.mg.undp.org/content/dam/madagascar/docs/rndh-2018/Rapport%20National%20sur%20le%20D%C3%A9veloppement%20Humain%20(RNDH)%20-%20Madagascar%20 2018.pdf, consulté le 6 février 2019.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (237)

237IRÈNE RABENORO

Razafindrakoto, M., Roubaud, F. & Wachsberger, J.-M. (2017), L’énigme et le paradoxe. Economie politique de Madagascar, Marseille (France) : IRD Editions/Agence française de développement (AFD), collections Synthèses. UNESCO, Année internationale de la tolérance 1995 http://www.unesco.org/new/fr/social-and-human-sciences/themes/fight-against-discrimination/promoting-tolerance/1995-united-nations-year-for-tolerance/ consulté le 2 février 2019.

Razainirina, R. V. (2019). Heart-based phrases in Malagasy : a cultural specificity as compared to heart-based related phrases in English ?. Master’s dissertation. University of Antananarivo, Madagascar.

UNESCO, (2013). Intercultural competences. Conceptual and operational framework.

Wamba, R. S. (2010). L’intercompréhension : une conscience métacommunicative pour une plus grande valorisation de l’interculturel, P. Blanchet et P. Martinez dir., Pratiques innovantes du plurilinguisme. Emergence et prise en compte en situations francophones, éditions des archives contemporaines/Agence universitaire de la Francophonie, 2010.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (238)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (239)

EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA Y DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE

Patxi Baztarrika

Resumen: La ONU adoptó en 2015 la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible, integrada por 17 objetivos con una base económica, social y medioambiental. Este artículo viene a considerar que también la preservación de la diversidad lingüística constituye un factor de desarrollo sostenible en nuestras sociedades y en el mundo global. Para fundamentarlo, tiene en cuenta el caso de la pro- funda transformación socio-económica de Euskadi a partir de la década de los 80 y la evolución social del euskera en el mismo periodo, así como la relación entre ambos procesos de cambio.

En este período, Euskadi ha protagonizado una profunda transformación social y económica, que responde a una determinada estrategia de desarrollo multifactorial de la que ha formado parte la revitalización del euskera. Este proceso ha evidenciado también el valor económico de la lengua minorizada y su contribución a la empleabilidad. Ciertamente, en un contexto de diversidad lingüística difícilmente cabe hablar de un desarrollo (humano) sostenible ignorando la cuestión lingüística.

Existen diversas maneras de abordar la diversidad lingüística. Con la mirada puesta en la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi, cabe hablar de un “modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística”: un modelo de sociedad establecido sobre criterios de igualdad de derechos y oportunidades para toda la ciudadanía, basado en un Pacto Social referido a la cuestión lingüística y que responde a un elevado consenso social y político. En el artículo se explican las

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (240)

240 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

características principales de dicho modelo de convivencia lingüística y su contribución a un mayor desarrollo (humano) sostenible.

Palabras clave: Euskera, modelo vasco, revitalización lingüística, diversidad lingüística, desarrollo sostenible, desarrollo humano, consenso, pacto social, Euskadi

THE BASQUE MODEL OF LANGUAGE REVIVAL AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Abstract: In 2015, the UN adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which set out seventeen global goals in eco- nomic, social and environmental areas. This article argues that effective preservation of linguistic diversity is also a factor of sustainable development in our societies and in a globalised world. This contention is grounded on an examination of the profound socio-economic transformation of the Basque Country since the 1980s and the social development of the Basque language over the same period, together with an analysis of the relationship between the two processes.

In the first ten years of this century, the Basque Country succeeded in raising income per capita, life expectancy, access to education and social services, among others to the level of the most advanced countries. However, this was not always the case. Since the 1980s, the Basque country has seen a profound social and economic transformation, based on a determined strategy of multifactorial development. The process of reviving the Basque language (which had been in decline until the 1980s) has formed part of this transformative strategy. The process has also demonstrated the economic value of the minoritised language and its contribution to employability. In a context of linguistic diversity, one cannot address the issue of sustainable (human) development while ignoring the issue of language.

There are different approaches to linguistic diversity throughout the world and indeed, within the territory of Spain itself. Turning to the case of the Autonomous Community of the Basque Country, one can see a distinct “Basque model of language revival”, whose two fundamental legislative pillars are the Statute of Autonomy and the Basque Language Act. This model of society is built on criteria of equal rights and opportunities for all citizens, founded on a social pact on the linguistic issue that enjoys a large degree of social and political consensus. The article explains the main features of this model of linguistic coexistence and its contribution to greater sustainable (human) development.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (241)

241PATXI BAZTARRIKA

Keywords: The Basque language, Linguistic diversity, Basque model, Language revival, Sustainable development, Human development, Consensus, Social pact, Basque Country.

1. Introducción

Como se sabe, para encontrar el origen del concepto y definición de “desarrollo sostenible” hay que remontarse al año 1987, en concreto al informe titulado “Nuestro Futuro Común” (“Our Common Future”)1. Aquella definición subraya la dimensión medioambiental del desarrollo económico: “hacer que el desarrollo sea sostenible, duradero, o sea, asegurar que satisfa*ga las necesidades del presente sin comprometer la capacidad de las futuras genera- ciones para satisfacer las propias”.

A los pocos años, la ONU dio el paso de acentuar la dimensión “humana y social” del desarrollo. En concreto, en 1990, el PNUD (Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo) dio comienzo a la publicación anual de informes sobre desarrollo humano a partir de mediciones del IDH (Índice de Desarrollo Humano)2. El nuevo enfoque prolonga su mirada más allá del crecimiento económico y el PIB de los países a la hora de medir el desarrollo de estos. Así, el Informe de Desarrollo Humano de 19903, primer informe de esa naturaleza, contiene la siguiente definición:

“El desarrollo humano es un proceso mediante el cual se amplían las oportunidades del ser humano. (...) Las tres más esenciales son disfrutar de una vida prolongada y saludable, adquirir conocimientos y tener acceso a los recursos necesarios para lograr un nivel de vida decente. (...) El objetivo central (del desarrollo) debe ser el ser humano”.

El nuevo enfoque se interesa, pues, por la vinculación entre crecimiento económico y desarrollo humano. Entre los ejemplos más recientes de dicho enfoque destaca la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible, aprobada por la Asamblea General de Naciones Unidas en el año 2015. Se trata de una Agenda integrada por 17 objetivos que descansan en una triple base económica, social y medioambiental. La adaptación de la Agenda 2030 para

1 Organización de Naciones Unidas - Comisión Mundial sobre Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo (1987). Nuestro futuro común. 2 Informes de Desarrollo Humano de Naciones Unidas: www.hdr.undp.org

3 Organización de Naciones Unidas (PNUD): Informe de Desarrollo Humano 1990. Edición en español realizada por Tercer Mundo Editores para el PNUD, Colombia, 1990.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (242)

242 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

el Desarrollo Sostenible a los diferentes ámbitos territoriales y administrativos es, asimismo, una tarea que incumbe al conjunto de las administraciones públicas4. Cabe pensar que una parte del éxito de la Agenda mundial dependerá precisamente de su territorialización, es decir, de la adaptación de sus Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible a las diferentes realidades socioeconómicas, ambientales, culturales y lingüísticas que coexisten en el mundo.

2. La Agenda 2030 de Desarrollo Sostenible de Naciones Unidas y la diversidad lingüística

La Agenda 2030 de Desarrollo Sostenible no ha reservado de manera explícita un lugar específico y propio para la diversidad lingüística. Cabría entender que la cuestión lingüística encuentra cierto acomodo indirecto en la Agenda 2030 entre las metas de algunos ODS (Objetivos de Desarrollo sostenible), en concreto en algunas metas correspondientes a los objetivos 4 (educación), 10 (reducción de desigualdades) y 11 (inclusividad y sostenibilidad de los espacios urbanos). No obstante, en mi opinión, habría sido conveniente otorgar a la cuestión de la diversidad lingüística un tratamiento específico y explícito en la Agenda 2030, en línea con la relevancia que la UNESCO concede a la vinculación de diver- sidad lingüística y sostenibilidad, bien incorporándolo como un ODS más, o bien previendo un tratamiento transversal que afectara a diferentes ODS.

Como es sabido, en el mundo la norma es el multilingüismo y el monolingüismo es la excepción. No se puede entender el mundo ignorando la diversidad lingüística, ni tampoco se pueden construir las diferentes sociedades sobre bases igualitarias, democráticas y equitativas desde la negación de dicha diversidad, porque ignorar o negar la diversidad lingüística implicaría ignorar o negar la pluralidad social y la libertad de las personas. Al respecto, en un texto publicado en el año 20105, sostenía que “en la medida en que la diversidad lingüística es un elemento constitutivo de las sociedades modernas, la gestión de dicha diversidad ha devenido uno de los indicadores fundamentales del grado de salud de las sociedades democráticas. Hoy, de la misma manera que las identidades excluyentes no resultan aceptables, tampoco lo son los sistemas democráticos que vuelvan la espalda al equilibrio

4 El Gobierno Vasco aprobó en abril de 2018 (véase www.irekia.euskadi.eus) la Agenda Euskadi Basque Country 2020, alineada con los objetivos y metas de la Agenda de Desarrollo Sostenible 2030 de la ONU. La Agenda vasca fue presentada por el lehendakari, Iñigo Urkullu, como la contribución vasca al desarrollo sostenible universal. Entre los planes del Gobierno Vasco incluidos en la Agenda se encuentra, entre otros, la Agenda Estratégica del Euskera 2017-2020, que da continuidad a la Agenda Estratégica del Euskera 2013-2016.

5 Véase Baztarrika, Patxi (2010). I Diversidad lingüística y política lingüística en el contexto de la globalización. En P. Baztarrika, Babel o barbarie (pp. 27-72). Alberdania, Irun.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (243)

243PATXI BAZTARRIKA

armónico entre las diversas lenguas e identidades”.

Si se puede realizar esta consideración con relación a las sociedades democráticas, qué decir sobre los países en vías de desarrollo o, en general, sobre aquellas sociedades en las que el respeto efectivo a las libertades y los derechos fundamentales sigue siendo asignatura pendiente. De ahí, pues, que juzguemos conveniente y necesario que la Agenda 2030 asuma entre sus acciones, objetivos y metas aquellas que persigan la preservación de la diversidad lingüística, tal y como, desde tiempo atrás, viene demandando la Cátedra UNESCO de Patrimonio Lingüístico Mundial de la UPV/EHU, en favor de que los ODS sean 17+1. Al fin y al cabo, los ODS deben concebirse como la fotografía de un modelo de sociedad al que debe aspirar la humanidad en el horizonte del año 2030, un modelo que no debe olvidar ni relegar algo tan relevante y constitutivo de la sociedad como lo es la diversidad lingüística.

3. Desarrollo sostenible y diversidad lingüística

Digámoslo claramente: al contrario de quienes consideran la diversidad lingüística un obstáculo para el desarrollo, o consideran la preservación de dicha diversidad y sus consiguientes políticas lingüísticas un lujo que solo se pueden permitir las sociedades desarrolladas, y estas especialmente en momentos de bonanza económica, nosotros afirmamos la estrecha vinculación y relación de indivisibilidad que existe entre el desarrollo humano sostenible y la preservación de la diversidad lingüística en las sociedades plurilingües, que son la mayoría en el mundo.

Asimismo, al contrario de quienes, desde la ortodoxia de los manuales de historia, prefieren interpretar el mito de Babel como una maldición en lugar de una bendición, a la luz de los diversos modelos de salvaguardia de la diversidad lingüística que existen en Europa y otros lugares del mundo, y a la vista de experiencias de revitalización de lenguas minorizadas -como es el caso del euskera en Euskadi, al que nos referiremos más adelante- es obligado concluir que el sostenimiento y desarrollo del plurilingüismo es un factor de progreso, cohesión social y fortalecimiento de la comunidad. La equidad, la igualdad y la libertad, que son condición necesaria para el desarrollo sostenible, ni retroceden ni se ven mermadas a causa del plurilingüismo. Al contrario. A más plurilingüismo sostenible e igualitario, más equidad, igualdad y libertad, precisamente porque cuando se preserva -o se erosiona- la diversidad lingüística, lo que se preserva -o se erosiona- son los derechos, la libertad y la identidad de las personas hablantes de las diferentes lenguas. Conviene recordar que, cuando hablamos de salvaguardia de la diversidad lingüística, hablamos de personas, de hablantes. El sujeto son las personas, no lo son las lenguas.

Merece recordar que, tal y como señaló la anterior directora general de la UNESCO, Irina Bokova, “la Declaración Universal sobre la Diversidad Cultural, aprobada por la UNESCO en 2001, elevó la diversidad cultural al

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (244)

244 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

rango de “patrimonio común de la humanidad”, “tan necesaria para el género humano como la diversidad biológica para los organismos vivos”.6

Al hablar de diversidad cultural es obligado referirse de manera inseparable a la diversidad lingüística, porque, como dijera Amin Maalouf, “La lengua tiene la maravillosa particularidad de que es a un tiempo factor de identidad e instrumento de comunicación. Es vocación de la lengua seguir siendo el eje de la identidad cultural, y la diversidad lingüística el eje de toda diversidad”.7 Es, asimismo, procedente recordar la referencia a la lengua en el artículo 2. a) de la Convención para la Salvaguardia del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial.8

Entre los posicionamientos más recientes es especialmente inequívoco el mensaje de la actual directora general de la UNESCO, Audrey Azoulay, con motivo del Día Internacional de la Lengua Materna el 21 de febrero de 2018.9 Según Azoulay:

“Una lengua es mucho más que un medio de comunicación: es la condición misma de nuestra humanidad (...) La UNESCO apoya las políticas lingüísticas que ponen de relieve las lenguas maternas y autóctonas, especialmente en los países plurilingües. La Organización recomienda el uso de estas lenguas desde los primeros años de escolarización (...) alienta su uso en los espacios públicos y especialmente en Internet, donde el multilingüismo debe convertirse en la norma. (…) Este es uno de los mayores retos actuales para el desarrollo sostenible, en el marco de la Agenda 2030 de las Na- ciones Unidas”.

Por último, en la comunicación de Naciones Unidas titulada “La riqueza del plurilingüismo”10, se insiste en la misma idea al señalar que “El plurilingüismo es esencial para el logro de la Agenda 2030 en su conjunto”.

6 Irina Bokova (2010), en Prólogo de Textos fundamentales de la Convención para la Salvaguardia del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de 2003 (UNESCO, 2010). www.unesco.org/culture/ich

7 Maalouf, Amin (1999). Identidades asesinas. Alianza Editorial, Madrid.

8 UNESCO (2010): Textos fundamentales de la Convención para la Salvaguar-dia del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de 2003. www.unesco.org/culture/ich 9 Audrey Azoulay. Mensaje de la directora general de la UNESCO, con motivo del Día Internacional de la Lengua Materna 2018. http://unesdoc.unesco.org 10 http://www.un.org/es/events/motherlanguageday/

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (245)

245PATXI BAZTARRIKA

4. El caso de Euskadi: tres décadas de profunda transformación socioeconómica y cambio sociolingüístico11

Hay una enorme diferencia entre la Euskadi de la década de los 80 del siglo XX (los primeros años de democracia y autogobierno) y la Euskadi de la segunda década del siglo XXI. En el periodo que las separa se ha producido una profunda transformación, tanto en los diferentes aspectos socioeconómicos como lingüísticos. El caso de Euskadi, a la vista del tránsito de la década de los 80 hasta la década actual, es claramente un caso de desarrollo humano sostenible, cuya articulación ha pivotado sobre bases sociales, económicas, ambientales y culturales, de las que ha formado parte también el proceso de revitalización de la lengua propia, el euskera.

Juan José Ibarretxe12, en el marco de una investigación llevada a cabo sobre la transformación producida en Euskadi desde el inicio del autogobierno, específicamente entre los años 1998-2008, tras subrayar que el “caso vasco” es un modelo aplicado de Desarrollo Humano Sostenible, señala lo siguiente:

“La defensa de la identidad, de la cultura, de la lengua vasca no está relacionada únicamente con un hecho político legítimo como es reivindicar una personalidad en el mundo globalizado actual; además está en relación directa con el logro de Desarrollo Humano Sostenible. (…) Profundizar en nuestra identidad como Pueblo está ligado hoy, ayer, y lo estará aún más mañana a la consecución, mediante el ejercicio del autogobierno, del desarrollo humano sostenible”.13

11 A efectos de este artículo, con el término Euskadi nos referimos a la actual Comunidad Autónoma del País Vasco (CAPV), integrada de los territorios históricos de Álava, Bizkaia y Gipuzkoa. Asimismo, el análisis sociolingüístico y los datos de la evolución social del euskera utilizados en el artículo se refieren a la CAPV. La CAPV es uno de los tres territorios del euskera (CA de Euskadi, CF de Navarra y País Vasco Norte en Francia), y es el ámbito jurídico-administrativo donde se concentra el 85% del total de la población vascohablante distribuida en el conjunto del territorio del euskera, Euskal Herria, y el 74 % de sus habitantes. 12 Juan José Ibarretxe ha sido vicelehendakari y consejero de Hacienda y Administración Pública del Gobierno Vasco entre 1995-1998, y, desde 1999 hasta abril de 2009, fue lehendakari de Euskadi. En octubre de 2010 defendió en la UPV/ EHU la tesis doctoral titulada “Principio Ético, Principio Democrático y Desarrollo Humano Sostenible: fundamentos para un modelo democrático”, una investigación de la transformación vivida en Euskadi en ejercicio de su autogobierno, y explicada en clave de Desarrollo Humano Sostenible.

13 Ibarretxe, Juan José (2012). El Caso Vasco: el Desarrollo Humano Sostenible. Bogotá, Ed. La Oveja Negra.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (246)

246 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

En efecto, el proceso de cambio, iniciado en la década de los 80 valiéndose del autogobierno recuperado a partir del Estatuto de Autonomía de 1979, ha evidenciado, por ejemplo, que el proceso de revitalización del euskera es un factor de mejor convivencia y mayor cohesión social, en la medida que conduce hacia un bilingüismo más equilibrado e igualitario y hacia una mayor igualdad de oportunidades de usos lingüísticos, y, por tanto, hacia una mayor libertad efectiva de opción lingüística. La cuestión lingüística y el desarrollo de la identidad también han formado parte de la estrategia multidimensional que ha hecho posible el cambio, de modo que el proceso de revitalización vivido por el euskera en las pasadas tres décadas también ha contribuido al fortalecimiento de Euskadi como comunidad, como una condición más del desarrollo mismo. Se ha evidenciado, asimismo, que el euskera también es un factor de relevante valor económico, porque contribuye al empleo y al PIB de Euskadi.

4. 1. La transformación socioeconómica

En la década de 1980, Euskadi era un país en evidente declive económico, castigado por la crisis económica incluso de manera más acusada que otras zonas del Estado español. El tejido industrial vasco había terminado siendo absolutamente obsoleto, lo cual trajo consigo una alta desindustrialización y consiguiente desempleo. La construcción naval, la siderurgia integral, los bienes de equipo, la industria papelera, la industria auxiliar del automóvil, entre otras, habían tocado fondo. Eran años en los que el cierre de empresas y la destrucción del empleo formaban parte del paisaje cotidiano de Euskadi.

Según datos del INE, la tasa de desempleo con relación a la población activa fue incrementándose desde el año 1977 (tasa del 4,89 %) hasta 1994, año en cuyos primeros meses llegó a superar en algunas décimas la barrera del 25 %. Prácticamente desde 1982, año de aprobación de la Ley de normalización del uso del euskera, hasta el año 1997, la tasa de paro no descendió del 20 %.

En sentido contrario, sin embargo, a partir de la década del 2.000 se fue ensanchando la brecha en las tasas del paro de Euskadi y la media de España, con un diferencial favorable a Euskadi. Euskadi llegó a la puerta de la última crisis financiera mundial, año 2007, con una tasa de paro del 5,7 %, según INE (EPA - Encuesta de Población Activa), o del 3,3 %, según EUSTAT (PRA - Población en Relación con la Actividad).14

14 Fuentes de los datos de este apartado: “2018 Presentación País Vasco. pdf”, de la Dirección de Economía y Planificación del Gobierno Vaco, sobre datos de Eustat, Eurostat y del INE. Ver www.euskadi.eus; www.irekia.euskadi.eus;http:// www.euskadi.eus/contenidos/informacion/7071/es_2333/adjuntos/2018%20 Presentación%20Pais%20Vasco.pdf;www.expansion.com/economia;http:/hdi. globaldata.org; Informe sobre Desarrollo Humano 2016 del PNUD (Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo);https://datosmacro.expansion.com/ccaa/pais- vasco; www.eldiario.es

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (247)

247PATXI BAZTARRIKA

En claro contraste con lo que acabamos de describir, Euskadi es hoy un modelo de desarrollo sostenible. Es un pequeño país que, en desarrollo económico y cohesión social, ocupa posiciones punteras, no solo en el Estado español, sino también con relación a la media del continente europeo.

En cifras de 2017, el PIB per cápita de Euskadi (33.088 €) se sitúa en el 132,4 % del PIB per cápita de España (25.000 euros), es decir, supera en 32,4 puntos la media española. Asimismo, está por encima de la media de la UE-28 y de la zona euro. Según el informe anual correspondiente al año 2017 hecho público por el Departamento de Hacienda y Economía del Gobierno Vasco (ver irekia.eus), el PIB per cápita en PPA está 23 puntos por encima de la media de la UE-28, y superó en un 14 % la media de la UE-15, la Europa de los 15 países más avanzados en términos económicos.

Por otra parte, para conocer el nivel de igualdad y distribución de la riqueza, resultan muy útiles, entre otros, la tasa de pobreza económica y el índice de desarrollo humano. Veámoslos.

La tasa de pobreza económica indica el porcentaje de población con ingresos por debajo del 60 % de la media. La referencia considerada es la del índice Arope de Eurostat. Esta tasa representa en la actualidad el 9 % en Euskadi, siendo inferior a las tasas de todos los países de la UE (la tasa de España asciende al 22,3 %), e inferior, asimismo, junto con la de Navarra, a la tasa del resto de las comunidades autónomas del Estado.

En cuanto al Índice de Desarrollo Humano, Euskadi se sitúa entre las primeras economías del mundo. Así, según datos de Eustat y Naciones Unidas, en el año 2015, el IDH de Euskadi era 0,916 (véase el Informe sobre Desarrollo Humano 2016 del PNUD, elaborado sobre datos de 2015 y publicado en 2017). Si efectuamos una comparativa con los estados, el citado índice de 0,916 sitúa a Euskadi en la posición 13 del ránking mundial, por delante de Suecia, Reino Unido, Japón, Luxemburgo, Francia, Bélgica, Finlandia, Italia, Portugal o España (cuyo índice es el 0,884).

Otro índice representativo de la calidad de vida es el denominado Índice de Bienestar creado por la OCDE con el objetivo de medir la calidad de vida de las regiones autónomas que integran los países de la OCDE (34 países), que, como se sabe, son los que tienen el más alto desarrollo en el mundo. Según los datos publicados en febrero de 2016 (véase www.expansion.com/ economia), Euskadi, con 7,1 puntos sobre 10, encabeza el ránking del estado español.

Si fijamos la atención en los indicadores relativos a la educación, observamos que, en 2016, la tasa de abandono escolar prematuro era del 7,2%, una de las más bajas de la UE (en el mismo año, en la UE era del 11,1% y en España del 21,9 %). Asimismo, también en 2016, en la población de 30-34 años, el 48,9 % había finalizado estudios de nivel superior, muy por encima de las medias europea y española.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (248)

248 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

En lo que al empleo se refiere, la tasa de paro se mantiene por debajo de la media española, y el diferencial con relación a la media de la UE-28 se va reduciendo progresivamente. Así, en 2017, según datos de Eurostat e INE, el desempleo en Euskadi era del 11,3 %, es decir, inferior en seis puntos al de España. Según datos publicados por Lanbide (Servicio Vasco de Empleo), en los primeros meses de 2018 en el 73 % del total de municipios de Euskadi (184 municipios) la tasa de desempleo se situaba por debajo del 10%.

En lo que a las ayudas sociales se refiere, según datos de 2015, analizados por eldiario.es (ver www.eldiario.es de 12-03-2015), “el 40 % de todo el dinero que se destina en España a ayudas sociales se da en Euskadi (...) En el País Vasco, las prestaciones sociales cubren al 100 % de los hogares en riesgo de pobreza, mientras que en el resto de España la media de las comunidades está en torno al 20 %”. Se trata, sin duda, de un dato extraordinariamente indicativo del modelo de sociedad construido en Euskadi en las últimas décadas, un modelo que busca la cohesión social y la reducción de las desigualdades, es decir, un modelo de desarrollo humano sostenible. De otro modo difícilmente cabe entender que el 40 % del gasto total de ayudas sociales del Estado español se ejecutara precisamente en Euskadi, cuando la población de Euskadi representa tan solo el 4,65 % de la población total del Estado. La razón principal que explica este nivel destacadamente alto de prestaciones sociales hay que encontrarla en el modelo de garantía de ingresos del País Vasco. La RGI es en Euskadi un derecho garantizado por ley, y según el SIIS, en el año 2013, el gasto ejecutado por Euskadi en garantía de ingresos representó el 42,24 % del total de las diecisiete comunidades autó- nomas.15

Estos datos dibujan, sin duda, un país avanzado, si bien indefectiblemente debe abordar sin demora importantes retos como, por ejemplo, los movimientos migratorios, la profundización en una convivencia respetuosa con la pluralidad, la mejora de la calidad en el empleo, la violencia contra las mujeres, la reducción de las desigualdades, la convivencia lingüística –en claves de equidad y de una mayor igualdad efectiva de las dos lenguas oficiales– o la apuesta por la innovación. Euskadi, además, tiene que enfrentarse a problemas estructurales como, por ejemplo, el problema demográfico, probablemente el más importante y de mayores efectos para el devenir de este país.

El interés de esta fotografía socioeconómica en el contexto de este artículo no es otro que el de intentar mostrar, por una parte, un país que ha avanzado de manera clara, con mucho esfuerzo, en la senda de un desarrollo humano sostenible, y por otra, el importante lugar que ha ocupado la cuestión lingüística en dicho proceso.

15 Centro de Documentación y Estudios Sociales SIIS (2017). Cuantía y gasto social de las prestaciones de garantía de ingresos en las Comunidades Autónomas. Estudio comparativo. San Sebastián. https://www.siis.net/documentos/ficha/498236. pdf

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (249)

249PATXI BAZTARRIKA

4.2. El cambio sociolingüístico

También la lengua propia inauguró la década de los 80 en situación de claro declive, como la economía. Téngase en cuenta que, tras un largo proceso de décadas de minorización y retroceso continuado, se había convertido en lengua minoritaria. Según datos de EUSTAT, obtenidos a partir del Censo de Población, en el año 1981, tan solo el 21,9 % de la CAPV se consideraba bilingüe. Este porcentaje quedaba drásticamente reducido al 4,0 % en Álava, y al 15,2 % en Bizkaia. Por su parte, dos de cada tres personas (65,9%) desconocían completamente el euskera: eran erdaldunes monolingües (castellanohablantes que desconocen el euskera).

En el siglo XIX, sin embargo, según Ladislao Velasco y Juan Madariaga, los vascohablantes eran mayoría en el territorio que hoy día constituye la CAPV.16 Según Madariaga, en el año 1800 los euskaldunes (vascohablantes) representaban el 76,8 % de la población y, según Velasco, en 1868 el 69 % de la población era euskaldun. El espectacular declive que se produce a partir del siglo XIX, pasando del entorno del citado 70 % al 21,9 % de vascohablantes de 1981, se explica por una pluralidad de factores, entre los que cabe destacar la falta de prestigio de la lengua en las élites culturales y políticas, la imposición del castellano como lengua exclusiva de enseñanza, y el brutal cambio demográfico que, con motivo de la revolución industrial, se produce a partir de la segunda mitad del siglo, cambio que se inició en Bizkaia, continuó en Gipuzkoa y llegó más tarde a Álava. Entre los años 1857 y 1970 se cuadruplicó la población (se multiplicó por 4,5) al haberse instalado en el territorio de la actual CAPV miles de personas inmigrantes, procedentes del Estado español, que desconocían el euskera y a las que tampoco se les dio la opor- tunidad de aprenderlo. El gran retroceso del euskera se refleja en la enorme pérdida del porcentaje de vascohablantes, no tanto en la pérdida absoluta de hablantes. La dictadura franquista, que se prolongó 40 años, contribuyó eficazmente al retroceso del euskera mediante métodos expeditivos propios de cualquier dictadura: prohibición y virulentas proscripciones sistemáticas del euskera.

Un dato indicativo del futuro que, de no mediar un cambio de rumbo, le esperaba al euskera en 1981 nos viene dado por su grado de penetración en los diferentes grupos de edad. Así, en la población menor de 15 años, los euskaldunes sumaban tan solo el 19,7 %, es decir, 2 puntos menos que la media del conjunto de la población. Los porcentajes más altos de conocimiento de euskera se registraban en la población de 60 o más años. Solo en la población mayor de 44 años las personas vascohablantes superaban la barrera del 20%. Era, sin duda, una lengua en claro declive en su uso en la sociedad.

En 1981, en el 26 % de los municipios (65 municipios) los vascohablantes no alcanzaban el 5 % de la población. Según el Censo de 1986, el 20,5% de

16 Madariaga Orbea, Juan (2014). Sociedad y lengua vasca en los siglos XVII y XVIII. Ed. Euskaltzaindia, Bilbo. / Velasco, Ladislao (1879). Los euskaros en Álava, Guipúzcoa y Vizcaya, Imprenta de Oliveres, Barcelona.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (250)

250 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

la población tenía el euskera como lengua primera (materna), y otro 3,8% el euskera y el castellano. Es decir, solo el 24,3% de la población tenía el euskera, bien solo o bien junto con el castellano, como lengua primera o inicial (materna). En resumen: la del euskera era una comunidad lingüística minoritaria, con un número de hablantes comparativamente muy inferior al de las lenguas propias cooficiales en Cataluña, Galicia, Baleares o Valencia17. En la década de los 80, junto con la profunda transformación socioeconómica que acabamos de describir de manera resumida, se inició el gran cambio sociolingüístico, que ha sido un proceso exitoso, un camino de luces y sombras donde han prevaleci- do claramente las luces, un proceso aún inacabado y que debe enfrentarse a nuevos desafíos. En los 34 años transcurridos desde la aprobación de la Ley 10/1982, de 24 de noviembre, básica de normalización y uso del euskera, se ha puesto freno al pasado de declive y se ha situado al euskera en la senda de un triple crecimiento: demográfico (aumento continuado de hablantes), geográfico (crecimiento en los tres territorios históricos) y funcional (el euskera se estrena como lengua de uso en algunas funciones y aumenta su uso especialmente en los ámbitos no formales). Según Miquel Gros i Lladós:

“Estamos ante uno de los mejores ejemplos de recuperación lingüística conocidos, uno de los que concita mayor unanimidad social, más alta rapidez en la recuperación porcentual del idioma, más profunda bilingüización en su primera edad”.18

A continuación, vamos a recordar algunos de los principales rasgos que evidencian dicho cambio.

La crónica del euskera en la CAPV a partir de los primeros años de la década de los 80 es la crónica de un crecimiento, tal y como queda reflejado en diferentes investigaciones, por ejemplo, en las sucesivas Encuestas Sociolingüísticas (la última de 2016) y Mapas Sociolingüísticos (el último de 2011) quinquenales elaborados por el Gobierno Vasco, y en los Censos de Población y Viviendas aportados por EUSTAT. Según los últimos datos publicados por EUSTAT (www.eustat.eus), actualmente en la población de 2 o más años, el 41 % es vascohablante (recuérdese que en 1981 lo era el 21,9 %), otro 15 % es vascohablante pasivo, y el 44 % desconoce completamente el

17 Según los datos de los correspondientes Censos de Población de 1986, en Cataluña sabía hablar catalán el 65 % de la población, y lo entendía el 92 %; en Galicia el porcentaje de quienes sabían hablar gallego alcanzaba el 90 % de la población, y el 94 % lo entendía. En Valencia el 49,48% conocía la lengua propia. Mientras, en la CA de Euskadi, el porcentaje de los que sabían hablar euskera era el 23 %, y el de quienes lo entendía el 38 %. El punto de partida de los procesos de normalización lingüística de las diferentes lenguas propias reconocidas como oficiales era, pues, radicalmente distinta en lo que al recorrido a realizar y las características del mismo se refiere.

18 Gros i Lladós, Miquel (2009). El euskera en la Comunidad Autónoma Vasca. Euskaltzaindia, Bilbo.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (251)

251PATXI BAZTARRIKA

euskera (recuérdese que en 1981 la población monolingüe erdaldun ascendía al 65,9 %). En el año 2016 se contabilizan 416.000 vascohablantes más que en 1981, y 401.000 monolingües erdaldunes menos.

La pirámide de edad de la población vascohablante se ha invertido, porque, a diferencia de lo que sucedía en 1981, en 2016, en los grupos de edad más jóvenes la mayoría es vascohablante, y cuanto más joven es la población, mayor es la proporción de vascohablantes. Bastante más de la mitad de los jóvenes menores de 30 años son vascohablantes, y en la población menor de 15 años el 86 % es vascohablante (téngase en cuenta que en el año 1981 no llegaba al 20 %). El euskera, desde el punto de vista de su penetración en la población según la edad, de ser una lengua “envejecida” en declive continuado, pasa a ser lengua “rejuvenecida” tras tres décadas de crecimiento.

También ha aumentado el uso del euskera, aunque en menor proporción que el conocimiento, como no podía ser de otra manera. El aumento del uso se ha producido especialmente en los ámbitos no formales y en la población más joven. Por ejemplo, en el grupo de edad de 16-24 años, el 29,5% utiliza el euskera tanto o más que el castellano, cuando 25 años atrás lo hacía tan solo el 12,4 %. En los últimos 25 años, en la población de 16 o más años, ha aumentado 5,2 puntos el porcentaje de quienes usan el euskera tanto o más que el castellano, y otros 3,1 puntos el de quienes lo utilizan en menor proporción que el castellano. Ambas tipologías de uso del euskera totalizan un incremento de 8,3 puntos entre los años 1991 y 2016.

Pero el cambio de mayor alcance se ha producido, sin duda, en el sistema educativo, que es el pilar principal de la transformación sociolingüística de los 35 años. En el curso 1983/1984 se inauguró en toda la enseñanza no universitaria el sistema de modelos lingüísticos, integrado por los modelos A, B y D, que se diferenciaban, y siguen diferenciándose, por su lengua vehicular de enseñanza. Así, en el modelo A el castellano era la lengua vehicular, y el euskera era una asignatura más del currículum. En el modelo B ambas lenguas oficiales, euskera y castellano, eran lenguas vehiculares. En el modelo D el euskera era la lengua vehicular, y el castellano era otra asigna- tura más. El aprendizaje del euskera y castellano era, pues, obligatorio, pero la lengua vehicular quedaba a la libre elección de los padres y madres. Pues bien, en el curso 1983/1984, el 14,2 % cursó sus estudios en el modelo D, y el 8,1 % en el modelo B. El resto lo hizo en el modelo A. Esa distribución ha ido cambiando de manera constante curso a curso, hasta el punto de que en el curso 2016/2017, el 66,89 % optó por el modelo D y el 18,8 % por el modelo B. Esto significa que, en la actualidad, el 85,7 % del alumnado del conjunto de la educación no universitaria cursa sus estudios íntegramente (66,9 %) o parcialmente (18,8 %) en euskera, mientras en el año 1983 lo hacía solo el 22,3 % (14,2 % íntegramente y 8,1 % parcialmente). En la universidad pública, UPV/EHU, en el curso 2018-2019, el 52 % de quienes se matricularon por primera vez optaron por cursar sus estudios de grado en euskera.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (252)

252 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

Como consecuencia de la destacada contribución que la escuela ha realizado al crecimiento social del euskera, junto a la aportación también importante, aunque menor, que ha efectuado el sistema de euskaldunización de adultos, en el año 2016 el 46,2 % de la población vascohablante es euskaldunberri (nuevo vascohablante), es decir, su lengua primera o inicial (materna) no es el euskera, sino el castellano. Sin embargo, 30 años atrás, tan solo el 14,4 % era euskaldunberri. Este cambio es indicativo del crecimiento social del euskera en las tres décadas.

Por razones obvias de espacio no podemos referirnos a otros varios indicadores que reflejan el gran cambio sociolingüístico y la situación sociolingüística actual (medios de comunicación, administración, TIC, etc.). Entendemos, no obstante, que el análisis aportado es una muestra suficiente del cambio que ha conducido al euskera en poco más de tres décadas del declive al crecimiento sostenido. Pero hay un elemento añadido que no podemos obviar aquí y ahora, dado que guarda relación directa con la contribución del euskera al desarrollo económico, y constituye, además, un enfoque nada habitual en el análisis de las lenguas minorizadas. Nos referimos al valor económico del euskera.

Ciertamente, para justificar la importancia de las lenguas es suficiente tener en cuenta su valor como factor de respeto a la diferencia, a la diversidad y a los derechos individuales, y también como factor de cohesión social y convivencia armoniosa. Pero no es ese el único valor que les asiste. Las lenguas poseen, además, valor económico, incluidas las lenguas minorizadas, y en el caso de algunas de ellas ese valor no es menor que el de algunas lenguas oficiales en la UE, que son tales, no por su número de hablantes, no por su mayor dinamismo económico, no por su mejor contribución a la generación del PIB, no por su alta empleabilidad, sino simplemente porque son lenguas de estado.

Lo cierto es que diversas lenguas minorizadas –entre ellas el euskera– generan miles de puestos de trabajo en Europa. El euskera, además, genera una facturación importante, lo cual supone una contribución directa al crecimiento del PIB de Euskadi. Así quedó demostrado en un estudio realizado por decisión y encargo de la Viceconsejería de Política Lingüística del Gobierno Vasco en el año 2015 sobre el valor e impacto económico del euskera en la economía vasca.19 Según dicho estudio, el sector económico del euskera, que desarrolla su actividad productiva en diferentes sectores, tales como, por

19 La Viceconsejería de Política Lingüística del Gobierno Vasco acordó en el año 2015 realizar un estudio sobre el valor económico del euskera, y encargó a la Sociedad de investigaciones socioeconómicas Siadeco la realización del mismo. Fruto de dicho encargo es el estudio “Valor e impacto económico del euskera”. Dicho estudio fue presentado inicialmente en un seminario que, organizado conjuntamente por el Gobierno Vasco y la NPLD, se celebró en octubre de 2015 en San Sebastián, y posteriormente, en febrero de 2016, en el Parlamento Vasco (véase Diario de Sesiones de 29 de febrero de 2016 de la Comisión de Cultura, Euskera, Juventud y Deportes: www.legebiltzarra.eus).

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (253)

253PATXI BAZTARRIKA

ejemplo, educación, universidad, administración pública, industria de la lengua (enseñanza de euskera, traducción, servicios de asesoramiento lingüístico, desarrollo del corpus lingüístico…) e industria de la cultura y los medios de comunicación, en datos correspondientes al año 2015, genera el 6,3 % del empleo de la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi, y su aportación al PIB de la economía vasca asciende al 4,2 %, aportación ciertamente considerable si la comparamos, por ejemplo, con la que realizan importantes sectores como la educación (5,5 %), el turismo (5,8 %) o la I+D+i (2,1 %). El valor económico del euskera es, pues, relevante en la economía de Euskadi. No es una carga a soportar, es un sector que genera economía en un nivel considerable.

El caso del euskera en lo que a su valor económico se refiere constituye, por tanto, una refutación de la idea que considera incompatibles el desarrollo económico y la revitalización de las lenguas minorizadas, y pone de manifiesto que las lenguas minorizadas, como el euskera, forman parte del desarrollo económico sostenible incluso en términos exclusivamente econó- micos. Además, debe tenerse en cuenta que, en las sociedades plurilingües, la oferta plurilingüe se adapta mejor a las necesidades y posibilidades de consumo de los diferentes mercados, por lo que el conocimiento y uso del euskera, o del catalán o del gallego, por ejemplo, es una ventaja competitiva en los mercados catalán, vasco o gallego con respecto a la oferta solo en castellano. Lo mismo cabe decir con relación al uso de la lengua propia en la Comunitat Valenciana. En junio de 2019 se ha publicado un estudio sobre el impacto y valor económico del valenciano, realizado por IVIE, por encargo de la Generalitat Valenciana, de similares características a las del ya mencionado de 2015, realizado por Siadeco por encargo del Gobierno Vasco, sobre el valor económico del euskera.

La preservación del plurilingüismo es, pues, rentable en términos de empleabilidad y generación de riqueza económica, y es además rentable en términos sociales, en la medida en que es factor de convivencia, igualdad de oportunidades y cohesión social. Al fin y al cabo, situar a las personas en el centro y como sujetos del desarrollo implica asumir que el valor del crecimiento económico se justifica y legitima en función de su aportación al Desarrollo Humano Sostenible, porque no hay sociedad que merezca la pena construir si no posee un alto grado de cohesión social. Ese es el enfoque que, con sus luces y sombras, y con muchos ámbitos de mejora, ha guiado el “caso de Euskadi” en las tres décadas.

Si levantamos la mirada desde Euskadi a la Unión Europea, veremos que los objetivos de la Comisión Europea descansan en factores tales como crecimiento económico, competitividad, empleabilidad y movilidad. A nadie se le escapa que la cuestión de las lenguas es fundamental en una estrategia de ese tipo. Sin embargo, las instituciones de gobernanza de la UE solo contemplan en esa estrategia las lenguas de estado oficiales en la UE, como si la diversidad lingüística con implicaciones económicas quedara reducida a las 24 lenguas oficiales de la UE. No es rentable, ni en términos económicos ni sociales, ignorar que, más allá de las 24 lenguas oficiales, hay otras muchas que son oficiales en ámbitos territoriales subestatales europeos y son,

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (254)

254 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

también, lenguas utilizadas en la educación, la universidad, los medios de comunicación, la creación cultural o las TIC, y, en consecuencia, contribuyen directamente al crecimiento de las economías “locales o regionales” y, por tanto, de la economía europea. En otras palabras: la diversidad lingüística que engrosan tantas lenguas no hegemónicas es un factor de desarrollo sostenible.

5. Los pilares del doble cambio: el cambio socioeconómico y el cambio sociolingüístico.

La pregunta parece obvia: ¿cómo se produce la doble transformación descrita en Euskadi? La respuesta es, sin duda, una suma de factores que han operado en una misma dirección.

Los analistas económicos coinciden en señalar que la razón por la que el PIB per cápita de Euskadi supere de manera tan evidente a la media europea hay que encontrarla sobre todo en que la economía vasca es en la actualidad muy competitiva: Euskadi cuenta con altas tasas de formación profesional y universitaria, y mantiene una apuesta continuada por la I+D, cuyas inversiones, cercanas al 2,0 % del PIB (1,82 % del PIB en 2016), se aproximan ya a la media europea (2,03 %).

En todo caso, ha sido fundamental el autogobierno recuperado con la democracia, sobre la base del Estatuto de Autonomía de 1979. Y, en el marco del autogobierno, ha sido especialmente decisivo el Concierto Económico, clave de bóveda del autogobierno vasco, porque ha permitido a Euskadi el desarrollo de políticas económicas, industriales y sociales propias, dirigidas a articular una sociedad avanzada en términos de desarrollo humano y a fortalecer una elevada cohesión social, poniendo en valor elementos constitutivos de la comunidad, como la lengua propia.

El Concierto Económico es fruto de la singularidad del autogobierno vasco, y posibilita disponer en Euskadi de una Hacienda propia y una relación bilateral con el Estado20. El Concierto ha sido, ciertamente, fundamental para el cambio, pero sería un error considerar que el Concierto lo explica todo. Hay también otros factores, entre los que cabe destacar el sistema educativo, la iniciativa y desarrollo de las empresas vascas gracias a los empresarios y los trabajadores, la apuesta por la ciencia, tecnología e innovación, el esfuerzo y liderazgo de las instituciones públicas y la colaboración público-privada. La conjunción de todos estos factores ha hecho posible la implementación de una estrategia de modernización y desarrollo humano sostenible, que ha dado como resultado el gran cambio.

20 El Concierto Económico, lejos de ser un privilegio -como erróneamente sostienen posiciones centralistas y uniformizadoras-, es un sistema de riesgo de anclaje histórico, que nos remonta hasta el siglo XIX, y de reconocimiento constitucional y estatutario, asumido por Euskadi a finales de la década de los 70 a pesar de coincidir con un momento de grave declive económico.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (255)

255PATXI BAZTARRIKA

En definitiva, la clave entre las claves reside en la estrategia, y esa no ha sido solo económica, sino que, además de los objetivos de crecimiento económico y sostenibilidad medioambiental, ha asumido los de la cohesión, i-gualdad e integración sociales. Ha sido una estrategia multidimensional propia de un desarrollo humano sostenible que, como tal, también ha asumido como propio el objetivo de revitalizar el euskera, considerando dicho proceso como parte constitutiva del gran cambio social. La cuestión de la identidad y la lengua han formado, y siguen formando, parte de la columna vertebral del país, y, por consiguiente, de su desarrollo.

6.- El modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística: un modelo de convivencia y equidad

El progresivo cambio sociolingüístico experimentado en 30-35 años a partir de la recuperación del autogobierno configura un “modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística”. Entiéndase que lo que denomino “modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística” en realidad es un modo específico de articular y gestionar la diversidad lingüística en la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi, en dos claves: la clave del desarrollo humano sostenible, porque contribuye a mejorar la convivencia y fortalecer la comunidad, y la clave del desarrollo sostenible de la propia lengua no hegemónica, el euskera.

Como se sabe, existen en el mundo multilingüe diferentes modos de abordar y regular la diversidad lingüística. Nos referiremos, a modo de ejemplo, a algunos de ellos.

Uno es el del unilingüismo, que normalmente se fundamenta en una concepción uninacional y abiertamente centralizadora del Estado, que, a lo sumo, alcanza a reconocer como simple patrimonio cultural las lenguas diferentes a “la (única y auténtica) lengua”. El caso de Francia es sin duda un exponente claro de este modelo.21

Otro modelo es el de los Estados que son plurilingües como resultado de la suma de ámbitos territoriales oficialmente monolingües, es decir, que tienen una única lengua oficial pero distinta de unos a otros.22

Hay también modelos en los que los Estados reconocen estatus de oficialidad a más de una lengua en todo su ámbito territorial, y además fomentan el uso de todas ellas en todo el territorio.23

21 Véanse los artículos 2 y 75-1 de la Constitución francesa, en los que se determina que solo el francés es “la lengua de la República”, mientras “las lenguas regionales pertenecen al patrimonio de Francia”.

22 Esto sucede, por ejemplo, en Bélgica (Flandes y Valonia), en los cantones suizos y en las provincias de Canadá, con algunos matices. 23 Véanse, por ejemplo, Finlandia, Irlanda, Luxemburgo.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (256)

256 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

Otro modelo es aquel que podríamos denominar “bilingüismo territorializado y autonómico”, que combina el reconocimiento de una lengua como lengua del Estado, y, al mismo tiempo, abre la puerta al reconocimiento de la oficialidad de las otras lenguas en sus territorios autonómicos por parte de los poderes públicos de dichos ámbitos, correspondiéndoles a estos la regulación de su uso y el diseño de las políticas lingüísticas. Ejemplo de ello es el modelo derivado de la Constitución española de 1978. Y precisamente como consecuencia de atribuir a las comunidades autónomas concernidas la regulación de la cooficialidad en sus respectivos territorios, también dentro de España existen, a su vez, diferentes modos e intensidades de abordar la diversidad lingüística, incluso en el caso de una misma lengua –el euskera, en dos terri-torios colindantes: Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi y Comunidad Foral de Navarra–.

La Constitución Española de 1978, determina que, por una parte, el castellano es la lengua oficial del Estado (…) y todos los españoles tienen la obligación de conocerlo y el derecho de usarlo y, por otra, abre la puerta al reconocimiento de oficialidad de las “demás” lenguas, las lenguas propias de diferentes comunidades, en sus respectivos ámbitos territoriales y “de acuerdo con sus Estatutos”. Asimismo, toma en consideración también otras lenguas al proclamar que “la riqueza de las distintas modalidades lingüísticas de España es un patrimonio cultural que será objeto de especial respeto y protección” (art. 3. 3). Lo que nos interesa subrayar en el contexto de este artículo es que la remisión del qué y cómo de la oficialidad a los Estatutos de Autonomía, y la posibilidad de un reconocimiento carente de estatus de oficialidad, de otras lenguas, pone de manifiesto que la propia Constitución opta por una diversidad de modos y niveles de gestión de la diversidad lingüística en España, de tal manera que opta por instaurar una jerarquía entre las diferentes lenguas, reservándose la cúspide de dicha jerarquía al castellano, en su condición de lengua oficial única del Estado, cuyo conocimiento es obligatorio para todos los ciudadanos españoles y su uso, al ser un derecho de todos los españoles, debe ser garantizado en todo el territorio de Estado.

Las decisiones adoptadas por las Comunidades Autónomas al traspasar la puerta abierta por la CE (art. 3. 2), tienen elementos en común, pero también diferencias. Así, algunos Estatutos coinciden en reconocer esas “otras” lenguas como lenguas propias, y también como lenguas oficiales como el castellano. Es el caso de seis Estatutos (País Vasco, Cataluña, Islas Baleares, Galicia, Navarra, Valencia). No obstante, hay diferencias entre los Estatutos que optan por el reconocimiento de la oficialidad. Por ejemplo, a diferencia del resto de los Estatutos, en el de Navarra24 la oficialidad queda restringida a una parte del territorio (art. 9. 2), y en el de Valencia se establece que una ley “determinará los territorios en los que predomina el uso de una y otra lengua, así como los que puedan exceptuarse de la enseñanza y del uso de la lengua propia de la Comunidad”. En efecto, las leyes de normalización lingüística

24 Ley Orgánica 13/1982, de 10 de agosto, de Reintegración y Amejoramiento del Régimen Foral de Navarra.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (257)

257PATXI BAZTARRIKA

de Navarra y Valencia concretaron, cada una con sus particularidades, la delimitación territorial de la oficialidad y consiguiente aplicación restringida de las citadas leyes.

Por otra parte, hay que tener en cuenta que no todos optan por la oficialidad, extendida o bien a una parte o bien a la integridad del territorio. Los Estatutos de Aragón, Asturias y Castilla y León (este último tras la reforma de 2007) optaron por el reconocimiento expreso de las lenguas distintas del castellano habladas en sus respectivas Comunidades, pero sin concederles estatus de oficialidad.

Es evidente, pues, la diversidad de los modelos de gestión de la diversidad lingüística, incluso dentro del propio Estado español. A la vista está que Euskadi, sus representantes políticos e institucionales tenían a su elección un abanico de modelos. Optaron por uno: se trata del modelo que descansa en el Estatuto de Autonomía (artículo 6) y en la Ley 10/1982, de 24 de noviembre, básica de normalización y uso del euskera. La elección es sin duda relevante, como puede observarse a la vista de la desigual evolución social del euskera en la Comunidad Autónoma de Euskadi, Navarra y Euskadi Norte (Francia).25

La realidad social del euskera en los años en que se negociaron y aprobaron el Estatuto y la Ley del Euskera era la propia de una lengua minorizada en su funcionalidad -como el resto de las lenguas del Estado diferentes del castellano-, y lengua minoritaria en términos demográficos -con notable diferencia con respecto a las otras lenguas no hegemónicas del Estado-. Quienes protagonizaron la negociación y el acuerdo del Estatuto, la Ley del Euskera y otras normas de desarrollo complementarias en aquella situación de minoría demolingüística, tuvieron varias opciones a elegir, al menos las siguientes.26

Una, considerar a los vascohablantes como una comunidad diferenciada a la que se le reconocerían algunos derechos lingüísticos con relación al uso del euskera, por ejemplo, el de recibir la enseñanza no universitaria en euskera o el de dirigirse en euskera a la administración. Ello hubiera significado tratar el euskera como cuestión exclusiva de los vascohablantes, y habrían declarado minoritaria ad aeternum la comunidad lingüística vascohablante.

Otra opción hubiese consistido en reconocer derechos lingüísticos con arreglo a la penetración social del euskera, limitando su ejercicio a aquellas

25 Según la VI Encuesta Sociolingüística (2016), entre los años 1991-2016, en la población de 16 o más años, el porcentaje de vascohablantes ha aumentado 9,8 puntos en la CA de Euskadi y 2,4 puntos en Navarra, y ha disminuido 12,6 puntos en Euskadi Norte (Francia). El 85 % del total de vascohablantes reside en la CAPV. Véase npp. 11.

26 Véase Baztarrika, P. (2010). La Ley del Euskera o el Acuerdo Político y Social en favor del euskera. En P. Baztarrika, Babel o barbarie (pp. 151-166). Alberdania, Irun.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (258)

258 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

zonas de mayor presencia del euskera, por ejemplo, la práctica totalidad de Gipuzkoa, una parte de Bizkaia y una pequeña porción de Araba, lo cual habría supuesto una desigualdad de derechos lingüísticos entre la ciudadanía vasca.

Sin embargo, optaron por una tercera, que consiste en otorgar al euskera el mismo estatus legal del castellano en Euskadi, extender la oficialidad a todo el territorio, con independencia del peso social del idioma, y reconocer a toda la ciudadanía, sean o no vascohablantes, los mismos derechos lingüísticos (conocer y usar indistintamente el euskera y el castellano, según su voluntad) y atribuir a los poderes públicos la consiguiente obligación de adoptar medidas para garantizar el ejercicio efectivo de los derechos reconocidos a la ciudadanía. Optaron, además, por fomentar activamente el uso del euskera, en aras a revitalizar dicha lengua, que se encontraba en situación de retroceso y franca debilidad. Optaron por construir una sociedad bilingüe de ciudadanas y ciudadanos bilingües, y sentaron las bases para avanzar de manera progresiva, según la realidad sociolingüística de las diferentes zonas, hacia ese objetivo común, para asegurar progresivamente el conocimiento y uso del euskera por la población. Optaron por un bilingüismo igualitario a construir de forma progresiva.

Tras la declaración de oficialidad del Estatuto, fue la Ley del Euskera donde se establecieron las bases del modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística en la línea de lo que acabamos de señalar. La Ley del Euskera fue mucho más que una ley: fue, en mi opinión, un Acuerdo Político y Social que representa, además de un modelo de abordar la diversidad lingüística, un modelo de sociedad que busca la armonía y la convivencia sobre bases de igualdad real, libertad efectiva y equidad, también en la cuestión lingüística. Es un modelo de sociedad que no se conforma con la coexistencia lingüística, sino que busca la convivencia y el respeto efectivo de la diferencia. Es un modelo de convivencia social que busca la complementariedad y el equilibrio de las dos lenguas del país, una complementariedad que aporte al euskera el oxígeno suficiente para que se desarrolle como lengua normalizada. Es un modelo de sociedad antidiscriminatorio que busca el desarrollo de políticas activas para normalizar el uso del euskera, a fin de que sea lengua de uso habitual y general, sin que ello se malinterprete como un rechazo del castellano. Es un modelo que opta inequívocamente por una convivencia lingüística armoniosa e igualita- ria, que cierra la puerta a una sociedad de dos comunidades lingüísticas y a la perpetuación tanto de una minoría lingüística como de una jerarquización de las dos lenguas de Euskadi. Es un modelo que sentó las bases para hacer realmente posible el cambio sociolingüístico en la medida en que esa fuera la voluntad de la sociedad. Es un modelo que pretende construir paso a paso una sociedad en la que la libertad de opción lingüística llegue a ser efectiva, también cuando la opción sea la del euskera. Es, en definitiva, un modelo que busca construir una sociedad en la que el euskera, patrimonio de todos los vascos, alcance el estatus de lengua (de comunicación) del conjunto de la ciudadanía vasca, es decir, una sociedad vasca con dos lenguas comunes.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (259)

259PATXI BAZTARRIKA

La Ley del Euskera, además del modelo que acabamos de caracterizar, representa un amplio consenso social y político en favor de la revitalización del euskera, condición necesaria para el éxito de cualquier política lingüística avanzada y, en general, de cualquier política social igualitaria. Pues bien: el éxito -no exento de sombras y nuevos desafíos a superar, cuyo análisis trasciende a este artículo- del proceso de revitalización lingüística iniciado en la década de los 80 radica en el modelo que representa la Ley del Euskera, el consenso social y político generado en su contexto y la adhesión de la ciudadanía, todo ello acompañado del apoyo activo de los poderes públicos, el dinamismo de la iniciativa social y la colaboración público-privada.

En definitiva, el Acuerdo Político y Social que representa la Ley del Euskera es el punto de encuentro de la pluralidad social y política de la Euskadi de los 80 en la cuestión lingüística, y en lo sustancial ha seguido siéndolo en las siguientes décadas, y como tal punto de encuentro ha constituido el marco que ha hecho posible el cambio sociolingüístico. En virtud del Estatuto de Autonomía y la Ley del Euskera, pudieron conformarse, pero no lo hicieron, solamente con proteger el euskera entonces en claro retroceso, sino que optaron, no solo por su protección, sino también por su crecimiento social, iniciando así un largo y difícil camino hacia una sociedad plural e igualitaria, también en lo lingüístico, pero única y no dividida.

Las palabras pronunciadas por el entonces consejero de Educación del Gobierno Vasco, Pedro Miguel Etxenike, en el Parlamento Vasco en defensa de la Ley del Euskera27, son especialmente esclarecedoras del contenido y espíritu de la Ley y del Acuerdo que la misma supuso. Así, según el consejero, “nuestro Estatuto no desea mirar y proteger al euskara en las bibliotecas y en los mausoleos, sino que desea proteger, cuidar y promover el euskara como lengua oficial en nuestras relaciones sociales”. Tras destacar como “altamente positivo el alto grado de consenso –excepto en algunos matices legítimos de expresar por todos los grupos en esta Cámara– a que se ha llegado, con responsabilidad por parte de todos, en el análisis y en el estudio de esta ley”, subrayó lo “importante que es que todos asumamos, como hemos asumido, una actitud positiva de promoción del euskera, cuyo resurgimiento y florecimiento nunca pondrán en peligro (…) el desarrollo del castellano ni su uso entre nosotros”.

El espíritu y horizonte del Acuerdo político-social que supuso la Ley del Euskera queda condensado en estas palabras del señor Etxenike:

27 Discurso pronunciado por el consejero de Educación del Gobierno Vasco, Pedro Miguel Etxenike, el 24 de noviembre de 1982, en representación del Gobierno Vasco, en la sesión plenaria del Parlamento Vasco, con motivo del debate y aprobación del proyecto de ley del euskera. Excepto Alianza Popular y Herri Batasuna, todos los partidos dieron su apoyo y votaron a favor. Herri Batasuna no participó en el debate parlamentario, ni en el proceso de elaboración y acuerdo de la ley.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (260)

260 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

“El bilingüismo completo al que se quiere llegar, ya que es legítimo, (…) tiene una serie de consecuencias que es necesario admitir. (…) Para lograr este objetivo de bilingüismo real y efectivo hemos de ser firmes en los principios, en el cumplimiento de los deberes que nos impone el Estatuto, con el fin de que la igualdad de las lenguas oficiales sea real, pero hemos de ser, y quiero decirlo también tajantemente, realistas y flexibles en la aplicación de dichos principios. Tardará mucho tiempo, y solo lo lograremos con un esfuerzo solidario, con la ayuda de todos, atrayendo a todos a este objetivo común, en llegar a esta igualdad. En una primera etapa constituye objetivo primordial garantizar a los vascoparlantes y al euskera el espacio vital –y no me refiero al espacio vital territorial– imprescindible para su desarrollo, y progresivamente tender hacia el bilingüismo total”.

Veintiocho años más tarde, en el año 2010, el señor Etxenike, casi a modo de balance, se expresaba en los siguientes términos:28

“A mi entender, la política realizada a lo largo de estos 30 años teniendo en cuenta la vía sustentada por esos pilares fundamentales ha dado unos frutos espectaculares: nuestra sociedad es más bilingüe que entonces; los jóvenes son más bilingües; el euskera cuenta con más hablantes que nunca; ha ganado nuevos ámbitos, y hoy tiene acceso a lugares que nuestros antepasados no hubieran podido imaginar. Por último, y también hay que hacer mención de ello, el euskera es, como lengua, más versátil y rico que hace 30 años. El euskera ha avanzado.

¿Por qué ha ocurrido todo esto? En mi opinión, a pesar de que sea verdad que la política lingüística de los poderes públicos ha sido eficaz, y he tratado de resaltar la importancia de ello, hay otra razón aún más decisiva: la voluntad de la sociedad. Ha sido la propia sociedad quien ha decidido impulsar el euskera. Si consideramos la experiencia de estos años, existen razones para valorar positivamente lo sucedido, al margen de las zonas de sombra que todos podemos detectar. Porque es cierto que quien desea vivir en eus- kera aún encuentra dificultades para ejercer sin trabas su opción lingüística”.

Concluyo señalando que, el modelo vasco de revitalización lingüística, a la vista de sus características y de los resultados obtenidos en las tres décadas aquí referidas, encaja plenamente en un modelo de desarrollo humano sostenible, siendo en el caso de Euskadi un elemento inherente a dicho desarrollo.

28 Etxenike, P. M. (2010). Cerca de treinta años de Ley del Euskera. En P. Baztarrika, Babel o barbarie (pp.13-18). Alberdania, Irun.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (261)

261PATXI BAZTARRIKA

Ahora, el reto del euskera es precisamente hacer que sea sostenible el avance sostenido de estas tres décadas, entre otras cosas porque, parafraseando la definición clásica de desarrollo sostenible, es obligación de las generaciones actuales transmitir a las generaciones futuras en condiciones más saludables y duraderas el legado lingüístico recibido.

Bibliografía

Azoulay, A. Mensaje de la directora general de la UNESCO, con motivo del Día Internacional de la Lengua Materna 2018. http://unesdoc.unesco.org

Baztarrika, P. (2010). Babel o barbarie. Irun: Editorial Alberdania.Bokova, I. (2010). Prólogo de Textos fundamentales de la Convención para la

Salvaguardia del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de 2003 (UNESCO, 2010). www.unesco.org/culture/ich

Centro de Documentación y Estudios Sociales SIIS (2017). Cuantía y gasto social de las prestaciones de garantía de ingresos en las Comunidades Autónomas. Estudio comparativo. San Sebastián. https://www.siis. net/documentos/ficha/498236.pdf

Etxenike, P. M. (1982). Discurso leído el 24-11-1982, en el Parlamento Vasco, en defensa del proyecto de ley básica de normalización y uso del euskera. Rev. int. estud. vascos, nº 43, 2, 1998 (pp. 323-332).

Etxenike, P. M. (2010). Cerca de treinta años de Ley del Euskera. En P. Baztarrika, Babel o barbarie (pp.13-18). Alberdania, Irun.

Eusko Legebiltzarra – Parlamento Vasco (1991). Ley Básica de Normalización del Uso del Euskera. Colección Trabajos Parlamentarios, 6. Eusko Legebiltzarra. Vitoria-Gasteiz.

Eustat. Censos de Población y Viviendas. www.eustat.eusGobierno Vasco (1989). Mapa Sociolingüístico: análisis demolingüístico de la

Comunidad Autónoma Vasca derivado del Padrón de 1986. Servicio Central de Publicaciones. Vitoria- Gasteiz.

Gobierno Vasco, Siadeco (2015). Valor e impacto económico del euskera. Viceconsejería de Política Lingüística. Vitoria-Gasteiz.

Gobierno Vasco (2016). VI Encuesta Sociolingüística. www.euskara. euskadi.eus

Gobierno Vasco (2018). Agenda Estratégica del Euskera (2013-2016 & 2017- 2020). www. euskara.euskadi.eus

Gobierno Vasco, Dirección de Economía y Planificación (2018). 2018 presentación País Vascopdf. www.euskadi.eus

Gros i Lladós, M. (2009). El euskera en la Comunidad Autónoma Vasca. Bilbao: Ed. Euskaltzaindia.

Ibarretxe, J. J. (2012). El Caso Vasco: el Desarrollo Humano Sostenible.Bogotá: Ed. La Oveja Negra.

Maalouf, A. (1999). Identidades asesinas. Madrid: Alianza Editorial, Madariaga Orbea, J. (2014). Sociedad y lengua vasca en los siglos XVII y XVIII. Bilbao: Ed. Euskaltzaindia.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (262)

262 EL MODELO VASCO DE REVITALIZACIÓN LINGÜÍSTICA...

Organización de Naciones Unidas - Comisión Mundial sobre Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo (1987). Nuestro futuro común.

Organización de Naciones Unidas. Informes de Desarrollo Humano de Naciones Unidas. www.hdr.undp.org

Organización de Naciones Unidas – PNUD (1990). Informe de Desarrollo Humano 1990. Edición en español realizada por Tercer Mundo Editores para el PNUD, Colombia.

Parlamento Vasco. Diario de Sesiones de 29 de febrero de 2016 de la Comisión de Cultura, Euskera, Juventud y Deportes: www.legebiltzarra.eus

UNESCO (2010): Textos fundamentales de la Convención para la Salvaguardia del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de 2003. www.unesco.org/culture/ich

Velasco, L. (1879). Los euskaros en Álava, Guipúzcoa y Vizcaya. Barcelona: Imprenta de Oliveres.

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (263)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (264)

LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, LINGUISTIC DIV MINORITY ...Linguistic diversity, minority languages and sustainable development = Diversidad lingüística, lenguas minorizadas y desarrollo sostenible - [PDF Document] (2024)

FAQs

What is an example of linguistic diversity? ›

Some examples of linguistic diversity include bilingualism and multilingualism. Similarly, an employee who speaks different dialects demonstrates the linguistic diversity of a single language. Creole languages, which arise by combining two or more languages, present another good example of language diversity.

What is linguistic diversity pdf? ›

Linguistic diversity refers to the number of languages. spoken by organizational members on a general basis. Hypotheses. Linguistic diversity. Many organizations are becoming increasingly linguistically diverse.

What is the linguistic diversity of the world? ›

There are approximately 7,000 languages believed to be spoken around the world. Despite this diversity, the majority of the world's population speaks only a fraction of these languages. The three largest language groups (Mandarin, Spanish, and English) are spoken by more than 1.5 billion people.

What does it mean to be linguistically diverse? ›

Language diversity, or linguistic diversity, is a broad term used to describe the differences between different languages and the ways that people communicate with each other. Language is one of the features of humanity that sets the species apart from others on Earth, as far as scientists are aware.

Is linguistic diversity a good thing? ›

Language offers new insights into our history, cultural differences, migration, and the way in which our brain processes information. This knowledge can in turn help us understand what it means to be human, as well as opening the way to many practical applications.

What causes linguistic diversity? ›

Historical Influences - India's linguistic diversity can be traced back to its complex history. Over millennia, India has witnessed the influx of different cultures, invasions, migrations, and trade routes, which have all played a significant role in shaping the linguistic landscape.

Who are called linguistic minorities? ›

Who are linguistic minorities? Linguistic Minorities are group or collectivises of individuals residing in the territory of India or any part thereof having a distinct language or script of their own.

How do you teach linguistic diversity? ›

You can do this by using a variety of teaching methods, materials, and assessments that cater to different learning styles, preferences, and goals, by differentiating your instruction and feedback according to the linguistic abilities and needs of your students, and by evaluating your own linguistic assumptions and ...

How do you embrace linguistic diversity? ›

By embracing a descriptive approach to language, rather than a prescriptive one, we open ourselves up to a richer understanding of the world around us and the people in it. So, the next time you find yourself in a conversation at work or with friends, take a moment to consider the words being used.

Which region of the US has the most linguistic diversity? ›

There are 200+ languages spoken in California, there are multiple unique populations of refugees, and people from all over the world here.

What is called the mother tongue? ›

Definition. Mother tongue refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the person at the time the data was collected. If the person no longer understands the first language learned, the mother tongue is the second language learned.

Should linguistic diversity be taught in schools? ›

Acknowledging our students' language backgrounds and experiences can be powerful: Not only does it contribute to fostering a sense of belonging, but also it supports learners in building their self-identity and celebrating each other's differences.

What is the most linguistically diverse continent in the world? ›

The label of Africa as the most linguistically diverse continent is still being debated based on varying definitions of “diverse”, and the answer to why Africa is home to so many languages is still up in the air.

Am I culturally and linguistically diverse? ›

The term 'culturally and linguistically diverse' (CALD), refers to people from a range of countries and ethnic and cultural groups. It includes people of non–English speaking background as well as people born outside Australia but whose first language is English, and encompasses a wide range of experiences and needs.